25 Works

Seasonality and interspecific competition shape individual niche variation in co-occurring tetra fish in Neotropical streams

Mayara Neves, Raul Costa-Pereira, Rosilene Luciana Delariva & Clarice Bernhardt Fialho
The drivers of intraspecific niche variation and its effects on species interactions are still unclear, especially in species-rich Neotropical environments. Here, we investigated how ecological opportunity and interspecific competition affect the degree of individual trophic specialization and the population niche breadth in tetra fish. We studied the four ecologically similar species (Psalidodon aff. gymnodontus, P. aff. paranae, P. bifasciatus, and Bryconamericus ikaa) in subtropical headwater streams (three sites with two co-occurring species and three sites...

Foraging and spatial ecology in a competitive environment: Polydomous carpenter ants (Camponotus leydigi) in a tropical savanna

& Paulo Oliveira
Carpenter ants (genus Camponotus) are considered to be predominantly omnivorous, mixing several feeding habits that include predation, scavenging of animal matter, and plant-derived resources. Nitrogen acquisition is crucial for the nutritional ecology of ant colonies since growing larvae require sustainable protein provisioning. Here, we investigate the foraging ecology and the spatial nesting structure of the carpenter ant Camponotus leydigi in Brazilian cerrado savanna. By marking workers from different nests with distinct colors, we revealed that...

Framing Interaction Anchorage in Mediatized Groups

Fernando Cavalcante & Michael Hanke

Remote Sensing Applications for Abating Aircraft–Bird Strike Risks in Southeast Brazil

Natalia S. Novoselova, Alexey A. Novoselov, Arthur Macarrão, Guilherme Gallo-Ortiz & Wesley Rodrigues Silva
The rising number of aircraft collisions with birds requires the development of appropriate mitigation measures to control their populations in the vicinity of airports. The black vulture (Coragyps atratus; vultures) is considered one of the most dangerous species for aviation in Brazil. To better understand the spatial distribution patterns of flying vultures and the risks they may pose to aviation, we studied natural and anthropogenic superficial factors and then numerically estimated and mapped the risk...

Fruit resource provisioning for avian frugivores: the overlooked side of effectiveness in seed dispersal mutualisms

Pedro Jordano, Elena Quintero & Marco Aurélio Pizo
1. Mutualistic interactions between frugivorous birds and fleshy fruited plants are key processes for both natural plant regeneration and the maintenance of birds relying on fruit resources. However, seed dispersal effectiveness (SDE) has been frequently studied only from the plant’s perspective, i.e. the contribution of animals to plant fitness. 2. Using a sample of Atlantic rainforest avian frugivores, this study presents a first comparative, empirical study of fruit effectiveness as a nutritional food resource for...

Lost and found: frogs in a biodiversity hotspot rediscovered with environmental DNA

Carla Martins Lopes, Délio Baêta, Alice Valentini, Mariana Lúcio Lyra, Ariadne Fares Sabbag, João Luiz Gasparini, Tony Dejean, Célio Fernando Baptista Haddad & Kelly Raquel Zamudio
Declines and extinctions are increasing globally and challenging conservationists to keep pace with biodiversity monitoring. Organisms leave DNA traces in the environment and this free DNA in soil, water, and air is referred to as environmental DNA (eDNA). The analysis of eDNA is a highly sensitive method with the potential to rapidly assess local diversity and the status of threatened species. We searched for DNA traces of 30 target amphibian species of conservation concern, at...

Palms and trees resist extreme drought in Amazon forests with shallow water tables

Thaiane Sousa, Juliana Schietti, Fernanda Coelho De Souza, Adriane Esquivel-Muelbert, Igor Ribeiro, Thaise Emilio, Pedro Pequeno, Oliver Phillips & Flavia Costa
1. The intensity and frequency of severe droughts in the Amazon region has increase in recent decades. These extreme events are associated with changes in forest dynamics, biomass and floristic composition. However, most studies of drought response have focused on upland forests with deep water tables, which may be especially sensitive to drought. Palms, which tend to dominate the less well-drained soils, have also been neglected. The relative neglect of shallow water tables and palms...

Historical biogeography of Vochysiaceae reveals an unexpected perspective of plant evolution in the Neotropics

Deise Josely Pereira Goncalves, Gustavo H. Shimizu, Edgardo M. Ortiz, Robert K. Jansen & Beryl B. Simpson
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Despite the fast pace of exploration of the patterns and processes influencing Neotropical plant hyperdiversity, taxa explored are mostly from large groups that are widely distributed, morphologically diverse or economically important. Vochysiaceae is an example of an undersampled taxon, providing an excellent system for investigating Neotropical biogeography. We present a phylogenomic-based hypothesis of species relationships in Vochysiaceae to investigate its evolutionary history through space and time. METHODS: We inferred a phylogeny...

Foraging and spatial ecology of a polydomous carpenter ant (Camponotus leydigi) in tropical cerrado savanna: A natural history account

& Paulo S. Oliveira
Carpenter ants (genus Camponotus) are considered to be predominantly omnivorous, mixing several feeding habits that include predation, scavenging of animal matter, and plant-derived resources. Nitrogen acquisition is crucial for the nutritional ecology of ant colonies since growing larvae require sustainable protein provisioning. Here, we investigate the foraging ecology and the spatial nesting structure of the carpenter ant Camponotus leydigi in Brazilian cerrado savanna. By marking workers from different nests with distinct colors, we revealed that...

The response of carbon assimilation and storage to long-term drought in tropical trees is dependent on light availability

Lucy Rowland, Antonio Da Costa, Rafael Oliveira, Paulo Bittencourt, André Giles, Ingrid Coughlin, David Bartholomew, Tomas Ferreira Domingues, Raquel Miatto, Leandro Ferreira, Steel Vasconcelos, Joao Junior, Alex Oliveira, Maurizio Mencuccini & Patrick Meir
1) Whether tropical trees acclimate to long-term drought stress remains unclear. This uncertainty is amplified if drought stress is accompanied by changes in other drivers such as the increases in canopy light exposure that might be induced by tree mortality or other disturbances. 2) Photosynthetic capacity, leaf respiration, non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) storage and stomatal conductance were measured on 162 trees at the world’s longest running (15 yr) tropical forest drought experiment. We test whether surviving...

Data from: Inducing seed dispersal by generalist frugivores: A new technique to overcome dispersal limitation in restoration

Wesley Silva, Cristiane Zaniratto, José Ferreira, Eduardo Rigacci, Jasmim Oliveira, Maria Morandi, Jéssica Killing, Larissa Nemes & Laura Abreu
1. Dispersal limitation severely impairs the trajectory of restoration, mainly due to the lack of seed vectors bringing seeds from nearby habitats; a role played by many frugivorous vertebrates that can be absent or reduced in restored or degraded sites. 2. Here we propose a new technique named Induced Seed Dispersal, that amplifies the role that many generalist frugivores have in seed dispersal. It consists in the offering of seeds embedded in the pulp of...

Data from: The diversity of post-fire regeneration strategies in the cerrado ground layer

Natashi Pilon, Mario Cava, William Hoffmann, Rodolfo Abreu, Alessandra Fidelis & Giselda Durigan
1. Disentangling species strategies that confer resilience to natural disturbances is key to conserving and restoring savanna ecosystems. Fire is a recurrent disturbance in savannas, and savanna vegetation is highly adapted to, and often dependent on fire. However, although the woody component of tropical savannas is well studied, we still do not understand how ground-layer plant communities respond to fire, limiting conservation and management actions. 2. We investigated the effects of prescribed fire on community...

Allometric escape from acoustic constraints in frog calls is rare

Joao Filipe Tonini, Diogo Provete, Natan Maciel, Alessandro Morais, Sandra Goutte, Felipe Toledo & R. Alexander Pyron
Allometric constraint is a product of natural selection, particularly with respect to body size and traits constrained by physical properties thereof, such as metabolism, longevity, and vocal frequency. Parameters describing allometric relationships are conserved across most lineages, indicating that physical constraints dictate scaling patterns in deep time, despite substantial genetic and ecological divergence among organisms. Acoustic allometry (sound frequency ~ body size) is conserved across frogs, in defiance of massive variation in both body size...

Ecological mechanisms explaining interactions within plant-hummingbird networks: morphological matching increases towards lower latitudes

Jesper Sonne, Jeferson Vizentin-Bugoni, Pietro K. Maruyama, Andréa C. Araújo, Edgar Chávez-González, Aline G. Coelho, Peter A. Cotton, Oscar H. Marín-Gómez, Carlos Lara, Liliana R. Lasprilla, Caio G. Machado, Maria A. Maglianesi, Tiago S. Malucelli, Ana M. Martín-González, Genilda M. Oliveira, Paulo E. Oliveira, Raul Ortiz-Pulido, Márcia A. Rocca, Licléia C. Rodrigues, Ivan Sazima, Benno I. Simmons, Boris Tinoco, Isabela G. Varassin, Marcelo F. Vasconcelos, Bob O’Hara … & Bo Dalsgaard
Interactions between species are influenced by different ecological mechanisms, such as morphological matching, phenological overlap, and species abundances. How these mechanisms explain interaction frequencies across environmental gradients remains poorly understood. Consequently, we also know little about the mechanisms that drive the geographical patterns in network structure, such as complementary specialization and modularity. Here, we use data on morphologies, phenologies and abundances to explain interaction frequencies between hummingbirds and plants at a large geographic scale. For...

Rearticulação de sentidos em filmes de compilação: uma análise de Yellow Caesar (1941), de Alberto Cavalcanti

Mariana Silva & Danielle Divardin

Tropical riparian forests in danger from large savanna wildfires

Bernardo Flores, Michele Dechoum, Isabel Schmidt, Marina Hirota, Anna Abrahão, Larissa Verona, Luísa Pecoral, Márcio Cure, André Giles, Patrícia Costa, Matheus Pamplona, Guilherme Mazzochini, Peter Groenendijk, Géssica Minski, Gabriel Wolfsdorf, Alexandre Sampaio, Fernanda Piccolo, Lorena Melo, Renato Fiacador & Rafael Oliveira
1. Tropical savannas are known for the fire-prone ecosystems, yet, riparian evergreen forests are another important landscape feature. These forests usually remain safe from wildfires in the wet riparian zones. With global changes, large wildfires are now more frequent in savanna landscapes, exposing riparian forests to unprecedented impact. 2. In 2017, a large wildfire spread across the Chapada dos Veadeiros National Park, an iconic UNESCO site in central Brazil, raising concerns about its impact on...

Doc Online n. 28: Política e ideologia

Marcius Freire

Rindo de quem? Construção e ridicularização do inimigo político no documentário

Paula Gomes

Guidelines for including bamboos in tropical ecosystem monitoring

Belen Fadrique, Joseph Veldman, James Dalling, Lynn Clark, Lia Montti, Eduardo Ruiz-Sanchez, Debora Rother, Francisca Ely, William Farfan-Rios, Paul Gagnon, Juan Carlos Camargo Garcia, Sonali Saha, Thomas Veblen, Ximena Londoño, Kenneth Feeley & Cara Rockwell
Bamboos are a diverse and ecologically important group of plants that have the potential to modulate the structure, composition and function of forests. With the aim of increasing the visibility and representation of bamboo in forest surveys, and to standardize techniques across ecosystems, we present a protocol for bamboo monitoring in permanent research plots. A bamboo protocol is necessary because measurements and sampling schemes that are well-suited to trees are inadequate for monitoring most bamboo...

Data from: Out of sight, out of mind: Widespread nuclear and plastid-nuclear discordance in the flowering plant genus Polemonium (Polemoniaceae) suggests widespread historical gene flow despite limited nuclear signal

Jeffrey Rose, Cassio Toledo, Emily Lemmon, Alan Lemmon & Kenneth Sytsma
Phylogenomic data from a rapidly increasing number of studies provide new evidence for resolving relationships in recently radiated clades, but they also pose new challenges for inferring evolutionary histories. Most existing methods for reconstructing phylogenetic hypotheses rely solely on algorithms that only consider incomplete lineage sorting as a cause of intra- or inter-genomic discordance. Here, we utilize a variety of methods, including those to infer phylogenetic networks, to account for both incomplete lineage sorting and...

Data from: Evolution and epidemic spread of SARS-CoV-2 in Brazil

Darlan S. Candido, Ingra M. Claro, Jaqueline G. De Jesus, William M. Souza, Filipe R. R. Moreira, Simon Dellicour, Thomas A. Mellan, Louis Du Plessis, Rafael H. M. Pereira, Flavia C. S. Sales, Erika R. Manuli, Julien Thézé, Luiz Almeida, Mariane T. Menezes, Carolina M. Voloch, Marcilio J. Fumagalli, Thaís M. Coletti, Camila A. M. Da Silva, Mariana S. Ramundo, Mariene R. Amorim, Henrique H. Hoeltgebaum, Swapnil Mishra, Mandev S. Gill, Luiz M. Carvalho, Lewis F. Buss … & Nuno R. Faria
Brazil currently has one of the fastest growing SARS-CoV-2 epidemics in the world. Owing to limited available data, assessments of the impact of non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) on virus spread remain challenging. Using a mobility-driven transmission model, we show that NPIs reduced the reproduction number from >3 to 1–1.6 in São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. Sequencing of 427 new genomes and analysis of a geographically representative genomic dataset identified >100 international virus introductions in Brazil....

Association of APOE gene polymorphisms with primary open angle glaucoma in Brazilian patients

Marcelo Occhiutto, Vital Costa, Mônica Melo, Flávia Bajano, Thiago Rodrigues, José Paulo Vasconcellos & Fernando Costa
Background: Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a multifactorial disease that affects 65.5 million people worldwide. In addition to the genetic variants already established as indicators of greater risk for POAG, the apolipoprotein (APOE) gene has been studied in some populations, with controversial results. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency of the genetic variants of APOE in the Brazilian population, and to evaluate the association between these polymorphisms and the risk of...

Data from: Modeling the mito-nuclear compatibility and its role in species identification

Debora Princepe & Marcus Aguiar
Mitochondrial genetic material (mtDNA) is widely used for phylogenetic reconstruction and as a barcode for species identification. The utility of mtDNA in these contexts derives from its particular molecular properties, including its high evolutionary rate, uniparental inheritance, and small size. But mtDNA may also play a fundamental role in speciation -- as suggested by recent observations of coevolution with the nuclear DNA, along with the fact that respiration depends on coordination of genes from both...

Associated evolution of fruit size, fruit color and spines in Neotropical palms

Lucas Ferreira Do Nascimento, , Renske E. Onstein, W. Daniel Kissling & Mathias M. Pires
Understanding how ecological interactions have shaped the evolutionary dynamics of species traits remains a challenge in evolutionary ecology. Combining trait evolution models and phylogenies, we analyzed the evolution of characters associated with seed dispersal (fruit size and color) and herbivory (spines) in Neotropical palms to infer the role of these opposing animal-plant interactions in driving evolutionary patterns. We found that the evolution of fruit color and fruit size were associated in Neotropical palms, supporting the...

Multitrophic richness enhances ecosystem multifunctionality of tropical shallow lakes

Dieison A Moi, Gustavo Q Romero, Pablo A P Antiqueira, Roger P Mormul, Franco Teixeira-De-Mello & Claudia C Bonecker
1. Biodiversity provides multiple functions and services to ecosystems. However, the role of biodiversity in sustaining multiple functions simultaneously (multifunctionality) is still poorly understood in natural communities, especially in hyperdiverse tropical freshwater ecosystems. Studies have focused on the effect of single trophic groups on ecosystem function and on individual ecosystem functions. 2. Using a 16-year database from tropical shallow lakes, we combined species richness of nine trophic groups into a unique measurement of multitrophic richness....

Registration Year

  • 2020
    25

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    20
  • Data Paper
    3
  • Collection
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  • Text
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Affiliations

  • State University of Campinas
    25
  • University of Sao Paulo
    3
  • Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
    2
  • University of Brasília
    2
  • Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul
    2
  • University of Birmingham
    2
  • Texas A&M University System
    1
  • Universidade Federal de Goiás
    1
  • Plymouth University
    1
  • Sao Paulo State University
    1