19 Works

Data from: Temperature can shape a cline in polyandry, but only genetic variation can sustain it over time

Michelle L. Taylor, Tom A. R. Price, Alison Skeats & Nina Wedell
Multiple mating by females (polyandry) is a widespread behavior occurring in diverse taxa, species, and populations. Polyandry can also vary widely within species, and individual populations, so that both monandrous and polyandrous females occur together. Genetic differences can explain some of this intraspecific variation in polyandry, but environmental factors are also likely to play a role. One environmental factor that influences many fundamental biological processes is temperature. Higher temperatures have been shown to directly increase...

Data from: Experimental reduction of intromittent organ length reduces male reproductive success in a bug

Liam R. Dougherty, Imran A. Rahman, Emily R. Burdfield-Steel, E. V. Greenway & David M. Shuker
It is now clear in many species that male and female genital evolution has been shaped by sexual selection. However, it has historically been difficult to confirm correlations between morphology and fitness, as genital traits are complex and manipulation tends to impair function significantly. In this study, we investigate the functional morphology of the elongate male intromittent organ (or processus) of the seed bug Lygaeus simulans, in two ways. We first use micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)...

Data from: Direction of biological motion affects early brain activation: a link with social cognition

Alan John Pegna, Elise Gehring, Georg Meyer & Marzia Del Zotto
A number of EEG studies have investigated the time course of brain activation for biological movement over this last decade, however the temporal dynamics of processing are still debated. Moreover, the role of direction of movement has not received much attention even though it is an essential component allowing us to determine the intentions of the moving agent, and thus permitting the anticipation of potential social interactions. In this study, we examined event-related responses (ERPs)...

Data from: Negative frequency-dependent selection is intensified at higher population densities in protist populations

Ewan J. A. Minter, Phillip C. Watts, Chris D. Lowe & Michael A. Brockhurst
Natural populations of free-living protists often exhibit high-levels of intraspecific diversity, yet this is puzzling as classic evolutionary theory predicts dominance by genotypes with high fitness, particularly in large populations where selection is efficient. Here, we test whether negative frequency-dependent selection (NFDS) plays a role in the maintenance of diversity in the marine flagellate Oxyrrhis marina using competition experiments between multiple pairs of strains. We observed strain-specific responses to frequency and density, but an overall...

Data from: Chronic household air pollution exposure is associated with impaired alveolar macrophage function in Malawian non-smokers

Jamie Rylance, Chikondi Chimpini, Sean Semple, David G. Russell, Malcolm J. Jackson, Robert S. Heyderman & Stephen B. Gordon
Background: Household air pollution in low income countries is an important cause of mortality from respiratory infection. We hypothesised that chronic smoke exposure is detrimental to alveolar macrophage function, causing failure of innate immunity. We report the relationship between macrophage function and prior smoke exposure in healthy Malawians. Methods: Healthy subjects exposed daily to cooking smoke at home volunteered for bronchoalveolar lavage. Alveolar macrophage particulate content was measured as a known correlate of smoke exposure....

Data from: The role of geography and ecology in shaping repeated patterns of morphological and genetic differentiation between European minnows (Phoxinus phoxinus) from the Pyrenees and the Alps

Hélène Collin & Luca Fumagalli
Neutral and selective processes can drive repeated patterns of evolution in different groups of populations experiencing similar ecological gradients. In this paper, we used a combination of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA markers, as well as geometric morphometrics, to investigate repeated patterns of morphological and genetic divergence of European minnows in two mountain ranges: the Pyrenees and the Alps. European minnows (Phoxinus phoxinus) are cyprinid fish inhabiting most freshwater bodies in Europe, including those in different...

Data from: Remarkably divergent regions punctuate the genome assembly of the Caenorhabditis elegans Hawaiian strain CB4856

Owen A. Thompson, L. Basten Snoek, Harm Nijveen, Mark G. Sterken, Rita J. M. Volkers, Rachel Brenchley, Arjen Van't Hof, Roel P. J. Bevers, Andrew R. Cossins, Itai Yanai, Alex Hajnal, Tobias Schmid, Jaryn D. Perkins, David Spencer, Leonid Kruglyak, Erik C. Andersen, Donald G. Moerman, LaDeana W. Hillier, Jan E. Kammenga & Robert H. Waterston
The Hawaiian strain (CB4856) of Caenorhabditis elegans is one of the most divergent from the canonical laboratory strain N2 and has been widely used in developmental, population and evolutionary studies. To enhance the utility of the strain, we have generated a draft sequence of the CB4856 genome, exploiting a variety of resources and strategies. The CB4856 genome when compared against the N2 reference has 327,050 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and 79,529 insertion-deletion events (indels) that...

Data from: Transcriptional changes during Daphnia pulex development indicate that the maturation decision resembles a rate more than a threshold

Ewan Harney, Stewart J. Plaistow & Steve Paterson
Maturation is a critical developmental process, and the age and size at which it occurs have important fitness consequences. Although maturation is remarkably variable, certain mechanisms, including a minimum size or state threshold, are proposed to underlie the process across a broad diversity of taxa. Recent evidence suggests that thresholds may themselves be developmentally plastic, and in the crustacean Daphnia pulex it is unclear whether maturation follows a threshold or is a gradual process more...

Data from: Age-related effects of chronic hantavirus infection on female host fecundity

Eva R. Kallio, Heikki Helle, Esa Koskela, Tapio Mappes & Olli Vapalahti
1. Pathogens often cause detrimental effects to their hosts and, consequently, may influence host population dynamics that may, in turn, feed back to pathogen transmission dynamics. Understanding fitness effects of pathogens upon animal host populations can help to predict the risks that zoonotic pathogens pose to humans. 2. Here we determine whether chronic infection by Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) affects important fitness-related traits, namely the probability of breeding, reproductive effort and mother and offspring condition, in...

Data from: Plasmid carriage can limit bacteria-phage coevolution

Ellie Harrison, Julie Truman, Rosanna Wright, Andrew J. Spiers, Steve Paterson & Michael A. Brockhurst
Coevolution with bacteriophages is a major selective force shaping bacterial populations and communities. A variety of both environmental and genetic factors has been shown to influence the mode and tempo of bacteria–phage coevolution. Here, we test the effects that carriage of a large conjugative plasmid, pQBR103, had on antagonistic coevolution between the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens and its phage, SBW25ϕ2. Plasmid carriage limited bacteria–phage coevolution; bacteria evolved lower phage-resistance and phages evolved lower infectivity in plasmid-carrying...

Data from: Climate mediates the effects of disturbance on ant assemblage structure

Heloise Gibb, Nathan J. Sanders, Robert R. Dunn, Simon Watson, Manoli Photakis, Silvia Abril, Alan N. Andersen, Elena Angulo, Inge Armbrecht, Xavier Arnan, Fabricio B. Baccaro, Tom R. Bishop, Raphael Boulay, Cristina Castracani, Israel Del Toro, Thibaut Delsinne, Mireia Diaz, David A. Donoso, Martha L. Enríquez, Tom M. Fayle, Donald H. Feener, Matthew C. Fitzpatrick, Crisanto Gómez, Donato A. Grasso, Sarah Groc … & C. Gomez
Many studies have focused on the impacts of climate change on biological assemblages, yet little is known about how climate interacts with other major anthropogenic influences on biodiversity, such as habitat disturbance. Using a unique global database of 1128 local ant assemblages, we examined whether climate mediates the effects of habitat disturbance on assemblage structure at a global scale. Species richness and evenness were associated positively with temperature, and negatively with disturbance. However, the interaction...

Data from: Experimental swap of Anopheles gambiae's assortative mating preferences demonstrates key role of X-chromosome divergence island in incipient sympatric speciation.

Fred Aboagye-Antwi, Nahla Alhafez, Gareth D. Weedall, Jessica Brothwood, Sharanjit Kandola, Doug Paton, Abrahamane Fofana, Lisa Olohan, Mauro Pazmiño Betancourth, Nkiru E. Ekechukwu, Rowida Baeshen, Sékou F. Traorè, Abdoulaye Diabate & Frédéric Tripet
Although many theoretical models of sympatric speciation propose that genes responsible for assortative mating amongst incipient species should be associated with genomic regions protected from recombination, there are few data to support this theory. The malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, is known for its sympatric cryptic species maintained by pre-mating reproductive isolation and its putative genomic islands of speciation, and is therefore an ideal model system for studying the genomic signature associated with incipient sympatric speciation....

Data from: Downsizing a giant: re-evaluating Dreadnoughtus body mass

Karl T. Bates, Peter L. Falkingham, Sophie Macaulay, Charlotte Brassey & Susannah C. R. Maidment
Estimates of body mass often represent the founding assumption on which biomechanical and macroevolutionary hypotheses are based. Recently, a scaling equation was applied to a newly discovered titanosaurian sauropod dinosaur (Dreadnoughtus), yielding a 59 300 kg body mass estimate for this animal. Herein, we use a modelling approach to examine the plausibility of this mass estimate for Dreadnoughtus. We find that 59 300 kg for Dreadnoughtus is highly implausible and demonstrate that masses above 40...

Data from: Rapid evolution of microbe-mediated protection against pathogens in a worm host

Kayla C. King, Michael A. Brockhurst, Olga Vasieva, Steve Paterson, Alexander Betts, Suzanne A. Ford, Crystal L. Frost, Malcolm J. Horsburgh, Sam Haldenby & Gregory D. D. Hurst
Microbes can defend their host against virulent infections, but direct evidence for the adaptive origin of microbe-mediated protection is lacking. Using experimental evolution of a novel, tripartite interaction, we demonstrate that mildly pathogenic bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis) living in worms (Caenorhabditis elegans) rapidly evolved to defend their animal hosts against infection by a more virulent pathogen (Staphylococcus aureus), crossing the parasitism–mutualism continuum. Host protection evolved in all six, independently selected populations in response to within-host bacterial...

Data from: Assessment of rival males through the use of multiple sensory cues in the fruitfly Drosophila pseudoobscura

Chris P. Maguire, Anne Lizé & Tom A. R. Price
Environments vary stochastically, and animals need to behave in ways that best fit the conditions in which they find themselves. The social environment is particularly variable, and responding appropriately to it can be vital for an animal’s success. However, cues of social environment are not always reliable, and animals may need to balance accuracy against the risk of failing to respond if local conditions or interfering signals prevent them detecting a cue. Recent work has...

Data from: The role of host phenology in determining the incidence of an insect sexually transmitted infection

Daria Pastok, Mary-Jo Hoare, Jonathan J. Ryder, Michael Boots, Rob J. Knell, David Atkinson, Gregory D. D. Hurst & Mike Boots
Changes in the timing of life history events within the year alter the degree to which the activity patterns of different species coincide, making the dynamics of interspecific interactions sensitive to the phenology of the interacting parties. For parasites, the availability of suitable hosts to infect represents a crucial determinant of dynamics, and changes in the host (and parasite) phenology may thus alter disease epidemiology and the conditions for disease maintenance. We tested the hypothesis...

Data from: Termite mounds differ in their importance for herbivores across savanna types, seasons and spatial scales

Andrew B. Davies, Shaun R. Levick, Mark P. Robertson, Berndt J. Van Rensburg, Gregory P. Asner & Catherine L. Parr
Herbivores do not forage uniformly across landscapes, but select for patches of higher nutrition and lower predation risk. Macrotermes mounds contain higher concentrations of soil nutrients and support grasses of higher nutritional value than the surrounding savanna matrix, attracting mammalian grazers that preferentially forage on termite mound vegetation. However, little is known about the spatial extent of such termite influence on grazing patterns and how it might differ in time and space. We measured grazing...

Data from: A cross-lingual similarity measure for detecting biomedical term translations

Danushka Bollegala, Georgios Kontonatsios & Sophia Ananiadou
Bilingual dictionaries for technical terms such as biomedical terms are an important resource for machine translation systems as well as for humans who would like to understand a concept described in a foreign language. Often a biomedical term is first proposed in English and later it is manually translated to other languages. Despite the fact that there are large monolingual lexicons of biomedical terms, only a fraction of those term lexicons are translated to other...

Data from: The effects of spatial structure, frequency dependence and resistance evolution on the dynamics of toxin-mediated microbial invasions

Ben Libberton, Malcolm J. Horsburgh & Michael A. Brockhurst
Recent evidence suggests that interference competition between bacteria shapes the distribution of the opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus in the lower nasal airway of humans, either by preventing colonization or by driving displacement. This competition within the nasal microbial community would add to known host factors that affect colonization. We tested the role of toxin-mediated interference competition in both structured and unstructured environments, by culturing S. aureus with toxin-producing or nonproducing Staphylococcus epidermidis nasal isolates. Toxin-producing...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    19

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    19

Affiliations

  • University of Liverpool
    19
  • University of Exeter
    3
  • University of York
    3
  • University of Manchester
    2
  • Keele University
    1
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    1
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • Stanford University
    1
  • University of Pretoria
    1