18 Works

Ant colour data from an experiment in Malaysian Borneo, 2015-2018

S. Law, T.R. Bishop, P. Eggleton, H.M. Griffiths, L. Ashton & C. Parr
This dataset measures colour and estimates body size of ant species collected across four vertical strata: subterranean, ground, understory and canopy in lowland tropical rainforest. Ants were collected using different trapping techniques in each stratum; baited traps were used in the subterranean, understory and canopy strata and Winkler extractions were used to collect ground ants. The colour of each ant species was classified categorically by eye using a set pre-determined colours. A single dominant colour...

Interspecific communication in African savannah herbivores

J. Bro-Jorgensen, D.W. Franks & K. Meise
This dataset contains information about various aspects of the alarm communication network of African savannah herbivores. Data were collected in April 2015 and between September 2015 and October 2016 in the Masai Mara National Reserve, in southern Kenya (1°30’S, 35°10’E). Research focused on the 12 most common herbivore species in the ecosystem. For each of these species, the dataset provides information on vigilance rates, the probability to alarm call in response to different predators, the...

Data from: Urbanization and the temporal patterns of social networks and group foraging behaviours

Teri B. Jones, Julian C. Evans & Julie Morand-Ferron
Urbanization causes dramatic and rapid changes to natural environments, which can lead the animals inhabiting these habitats to adjust their behavioral responses. For social animals, urbanized environments may alter group social dynamics through modification of the external environment (e.g., resource distribution). This might lead to changes in how individuals associate or engage in group behaviors, which could alter the stability and characteristics of social groups. However, the potential impacts of urban habitat use, and of...

Data from: A comprehensive large-scale assessment of fisheries bycatch risk to threatened seabird populations

Thomas A. Clay, Cleo Small, Geoffrey N. Tuck, Deborah Pardo, Ana P.B. Carneiro, Andrew G. Wood, John P. Croxall, Glenn T. Crossin & Richard A. Phillips
1. Incidental mortality (bycatch) in fisheries remains the greatest threat to many large marine vertebrates and is a major barrier to fisheries sustainability. Robust assessments of bycatch risk are crucial for informing effective mitigation strategies, but are hampered by missing information on the distributions of key life-history stages (adult breeders and non-breeders, immatures and juveniles). 2. Using a uniquely comprehensive biologging dataset (1697 tracks, 790 individuals), we assessed spatial overlap of four threatened seabird populations...

Data from: Evolutionary potential of thermal preference and heat tolerance in Drosophila subobscura

Luis E. Castañeda, Valèria Romero-Soriano, Andres Mesas, Derek A. Roff & Mauro Santos
Evolutionary change of thermal traits (i.e. heat tolerance and behavioral thermoregulation) is one of the most important mechanisms exhibited by organisms to respond to global warming. However, the evolutionary potential of heat tolerance, estimated as narrow-sense heritability, depends on the methodology employed. An alternative adaptive mechanism to buffer extreme temperatures is behavioral thermoregulation, although the association between heat tolerance and thermal preference is not clearly understood. We suspect that methodological effects associated with the duration...

A framework for mapping the distribution of seabirds by integrating tracking, demography and phenology

Ana P. B. Carneiro, Elizabeth J. Pearmain, Steffen Oppel, Thomas A. Clay, Richard A. Phillips, Anne-Sophie Bonnet-Lebrun, Ross M. Wanless, Edward Abraham, Yvan Richard, Joel Rice, Jonathan Handley, Tammy E. Davies, Ben J. Dilley, Peter G. Ryan, Cleo Small, Javier Arata, John P. Y. Arnould, Elizabeth Bell, Leandro Bugoni, Letizia Campioni, Paulo Catry, Jaimie Cleeland, Lorna Deppe, Graeme Elliott, Amanda Freeman … & Maria P. Dias
1. The identification of geographic areas where the densities of animals are highest across their annual cycles is a crucial step in conservation planning. In marine environments, however, it can be particularly difficult to map the distribution of species, and the methods used are usually biased towards adults, neglecting the distribution of other life-history stages even though they can represent a substantial proportion of the total population. 2. Here we develop a methodological framework for...

Prey density affects predator foraging strategy in an Antarctic ecosystem

Karl Busdieker, Samantha Patrick, Alice Trevail & Sébastien Descamps
Studying the effects of prey distribution on predator behaviour is complex in systems where there are multiple prey species. The role of prey density in predator behaviour is rarely studied in closed ecosystems of one predator species and one prey species, despite these being an ideal opportunity to test these hypotheses. In this study, we investigate the effect of prey density on the foraging behaviour of a predatory species in an isolated Antarctic ecosystem of...

Data from: Cross-boundary human impacts compromise the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem

Michiel P. Veldhuis, Mark E. Ritchie, Joseph O. Ogutu, Thomas A. Morrison, Colin M. Beale, Anna B. Estes, William Mwakilema, Gordon O. Ojwang, Catherine L. Parr, James Probert, Patrick W. Wargute, J. Grant C. Hopcraft & Han Olff
Protected areas provide major benefits for humans in the form of ecosystem services, but landscape degradation by human activity at their edges may compromise their ecological functioning. Using multiple lines of evidence from 40 years of research in the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem, we find that such edge degradation has effectively “squeezed” wildlife into the core protected area and has altered the ecosystem’s dynamics even within this 40,000-square-kilometer ecosystem. This spatial cascade reduced resilience in the core...

Personality predicts foraging site fidelity and trip repeatability in a marine predator

Stephanie M. Harris, Sébastien Descamps, Lynne U. Sneddon, Philip Bertrand, Olivier Chastel & Samantha C. Patrick
1. Animal populations are often comprised of both foraging specialists and generalists. For instance, some individuals show higher foraging site fidelity (spatial specialisation) than others. Such individual differences in degree of specialisation can persist over timescales of months or even years in long-lived animals, but the mechanisms leading to these different individual strategies are not fully understood. 2. There is accumulating evidence that individual variation in foraging behaviour is shaped by animal personality traits, such...

Data from: Distinct spread of DNA and RNA viruses among mammals amid prominent role of domestic species

Konstans Wells, Serge Morand, Maya Wardeh & Matthew Baylis
Aim: Emerging infectious diseases arising from pathogen spillover from mammals to humans comprise a substantial health threat. Tracing virus origin and predicting the most likely host species for future spillover events are major objectives in One Health disciplines. We assessed patterns of virus sharing among a large diversity of mammals, including humans and domestic species. Location: Global. Time period: Current. Major taxa studied: Mammals and associated viruses. Methods: We used network centrality analysis and trait-based...

Data from: Environmental heterogeneity decreases reproductive success via effects on foraging behaviour

Alice Trevail, Jonathan Green, Jonathan Sharples, Jeff Polton, Peter Miller, Francis Daunt, Ellie Owen, Mark Bolton, Kendrew Colhoun, Stephen Newton, Gail Robertson & Samantha Patrick
Environmental heterogeneity shapes the uneven distribution of resources available to foragers, and is ubiquitous in nature. Optimal foraging theory predicts that an animal’s ability to exploit resource patches is key to foraging success. However, the potential fitness costs and benefits of foraging in a heterogeneous environment are difficult to measure empirically. Heterogeneity may provide higher quality foraging opportunities, or alternatively could increase the cost of resource acquisition because of reduced patch density or increased competition....

Differential impact of nevirapine on artemether-lumefantrine pharmacokinetics in individuals stratified by CYP2B6 c.516G>T genotypes

Sa'ad Abdullahi, Julius Soyinka, Adeniyi Olagunju, Rahman Bolarinwa, Olusola Olarewaju, Moji Bakare-Odunola, Markus Winterberg, Joel Tarning, Andrew Owen & Saye Khoo
There is an increased recognition of the need to identify and quantify the impact of genetic polymorphisms on drug-drug interactions. This study investigated the pharmacogenetics of the pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction between nevirapine and artemether-lumefantrine in HIV-positive and HIV-negative adult Nigerian subjects. Thirty each of HIV-infected patients on nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy and HIV-negative volunteers without clinical malaria, but with predetermined CYP2B6 c.516GG and TT genotypes were administered a complete treatment dose of 3-days of artemether-lumefantrine. Rich...

Data from: Experimental evolution reveals divergence in female genital teeth morphology in response to sexual conflict intensity in a moth

Kathryn B. McNamara, Liam R. Dougherty, Nina Wedell & Leigh W. Simmons
The rapid evolutionary divergence of male genital structures under sexual selection is well documented. However, variation in female genital traits and the potential for sexual conflict to drive the coevolution between male and female traits has only recently received attention. In many lepidopterans females possess genital teeth (collectively, signa). Comparative studies suggest these teeth, involved in the deflation of spermatophores, may have coevolved with male spermatophore thickness via sexually antagonistic coevolution in a contest over...

Data from: Rapid shifts in the thermal sensitivity of growth but not development rate causes temperature-size response variability during ontogeny in arthropods

Curtis R. Horne, Andrew G. Hirst, David Atkinson, Rodrigo Almeda & Thomas Kiørboe
Size at maturity in ectotherms commonly declines with warming. This near-universal phenomenon, formalised as the temperature-size rule, has been observed in over 80% of tested species, from bacteria to fish. The proximate cause has been attributed to the greater temperature dependence of development rate than growth rate, causing individuals to develop earlier but mature smaller in the warm. However, few studies have examined the ontogenetic progression of the temperature-size response at high resolution. Using marine...

Anne Curry, Malcolm Vale, Frédéric Boutoulle, Paul Booth, Philip Morgan, Paul Spence, Francoise Lainé, Frank Byrne, Paul Caton, Nigel Coulton, Jon Denton, Nathan Dobson, Elise Dudézert, Dilys Firn, Eric Foster, John Gowling, Nicholas A. Gribit, Simon Harris, Catherine Howarth, Neil Jakeman, Adrian Jobson, Maureen Jurkowski, Faith Lawrence, Jonathan Mackman, Nelly Martin … & Chris Watson
The Gascon Rolls CKAN Dataset makes available the following resources: - The set of rolls in TEI-XML format; - An Eatsml file in XML containing the set of entity records (for persons, places, etc.) out of which the indexes and search available on the project site are generated; - The project guidelines for encoding the calendared versions of the rolls into TEI-XML.

Data from: No selection for change in polyandry under experimental evolution

Andreas Sutter, Laura M. Travers, Melanie Weedon, Keiko Oku, Thomas A.R. Price & Nina Wedell
What drives mating system variation is a major question in evolutionary biology. Female multiple mating (polyandry) has diverse evolutionary consequences, and there are many potential benefits and costs of polyandry. However, our understanding of its evolution is biased towards studies enforcing monandry in polyandrous species. What drives and maintains variation in polyandry between individuals, genotypes, populations and species remains poorly understood. Genetic variation in polyandry may be actively maintained by selection, or arise by chance...

Dive times and depths of auks (Atlantic puffin, common guillemot and razorbill) from the Isle of May outside the seabird breeding season

R.E. Dunn, S. Wanless, J.A. Green, M.P. Harris & F. Daunt
This dataset contains the dive times (dive start time and dive end time) and depths (maximum depth attained on a dive) of three species of auk from the Isle of May outside the seabird breeding season. Data were collected from 12 Atlantic puffin individuals (Fratercula arctica), 13 common guillemot (Uria aalge) and 13 razorbill (Alca torda). Atlantic puffin data were collected between 19th July 2008 to 3rd December 2008; common guillemot data from 20th July...

Bait use of arboreal ants in a lowland tropical rainforest, Maliau Basin Conservation Area, Malaysia, 2015-2018

S. Law & C. Parr
This dataset measures the abundance of ant species at baited traps set across twelve trees in four experimental plots in lowland, tropical rainforest. Baited traps were set at 5 m vertical intervals from the ground to as high as possible in the canopy, the stratum of each trap location was recorded. At each height two pairs of baited traps were set, each pair contained one trap baited with carbohydrate (honey and oats) and the second...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    18

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    17

Affiliations

  • University of Liverpool
    18
  • Royal Society for the Protection of Birds
    3
  • Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé
    2
  • Norwegian Polar Institute
    2
  • University of Exeter
    2
  • Keele University
    1
  • National Oceanography Centre
    1
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    1
  • University of Hohenheim
    1
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    1