3 Works

Data from: Outlier SNP markers reveal fine-scale genetic structuring across European hake populations (Merluccius merluccius)

Ilaria Milano, Massimiliano Babbucci, Alessia Cariani, Miroslava Atanassova, Dorte Bekkevold, Gary R. Carvalho, Montserrat Espiñeira, Fabio Fiorentino, Germana Garofalo, Audrey J. Geffen, Einar E. Nielsen, Rob Ogden, Tomaso Patarnello, Marco Stagioni, Fausto Tinti & Luca Bargelloni
Shallow population structure is generally reported for most marine fish and explained as a consequence of high dispersal, connectivity and large population size. Targeted gene analyses and more recently genome-wide studies have challenged such view, suggesting that adaptive divergence might occur even when neutral markers provide genetic homogeneity across populations. Here, 381 SNPs located in transcribed regions were used to assess large- and fine-scale population structure in the European hake (Merluccius merluccius), a widely distributed...

Data from: In situ genetic association for serotiny, a fire-related trait, in Mediterranean maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton)

Katharina B. Budde, Myriam Heuertz, Ana Hernández-Serrano, Juli G. Pausas, Giovanni G. Vendramin, Miguel Verdú & Santiago C. González-Martínez
Wildfire is a major ecological driver of plant evolution. Understanding the genetic basis of plant adaptation to wildfire is crucial, because impending climate change will involve fire regime changes worldwide. We studied the molecular genetic basis of serotiny, a fire-related trait, in Mediterranean maritime pine using association genetics. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) set was used to identify genotype : phenotype associations in situ in an unstructured natural population of maritime pine (eastern Iberian Peninsula)...

Data from: The fourth dimension of tool use: temporally enduring artefacts aid primates learning to use tools

Dorothy M. Fragaszy, Dora Biro, Yonat Eshchar, Tatyana Humle, Patrícia Izar, Briseida Resende & Elisabetta Visalberghi
All investigated cases of habitual tool use in wild chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys include youngsters encountering durable artefacts, most often in a supportive social context. We propose that enduring artefacts associated with tool use, such as previously used tools, partly processed food items and residual material from previous activity, aid non-human primates to learn to use tools, and to develop expertise in their use, thus contributing to traditional technologies in non-humans. Therefore, social contributions to...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • National Research Council
    3
  • Bangor University
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • University of Kent
    1
  • University of Bologna
    1
  • Spanish National Research Council
    1
  • University of Sao Paulo
    1
  • Environmental Protection Agency
    1
  • Forest Research
    1
  • University of Bergen
    1