7 Works

Data from: Chewing on the trees: constraints and adaptation in the evolution of the primate mandible

Carlo Meloro, Nilton Carlos Cáceres, Francesco Carotenuto, Jonas Sponchiado, Geruza Leal Melo, Federico Passaro & Pasquale Raia
Chewing on different food types is a demanding biological function. The classic assumption in studying the shape of feeding apparatuses is that animals are what they eat, meaning that adaptation to different food items accounts for most of their interspecific variation. Yet, a growing body of evidence points against this concept. We use the primate mandible as a model structure to investigate the complex interplay between shape, size, diet and phylogeny. We find a weak...

Data from: The importance of mammalian torpor for survival in a post-fire landscape

Clare Stawski, Gerhard Körtner, Julia Nowack & Fritz Geiser
Wildfires have increased in frequency and intensity worldwide with climate change as a main driving factor. While a number of studies have focused on population changes in regard to fires, there are essentially no quantitative data on behavioural and physiological adjustments that are vital for the persistence of individuals during and after fires. Here we show that brown antechinus, a small insectivorous marsupial mammal, (i) endured a prescribed fire in situ, (ii) remained in their...

Data from: The extinct, giant giraffid Sivatherium giganteum: skeletal reconstruction and body mass estimation

Christopher Basu, Peter L. Falkingham & John R. Hutchinson
Sivatherium giganteum is an extinct giraffid from the Plio–Pleistocene boundary of the Himalayan foothills. To date, there has been no rigorous skeletal reconstruction of this unusual mammal. Historical and contemporary accounts anecdotally state that Sivatherium rivalled the African elephant in terms of its body mass, but this statement has never been tested. Here, we present a three-dimensional composite skeletal reconstruction and calculate a representative body mass estimate for this species using a volumetric method. We...

Data from: Banded mongooses avoid inbreeding when mating with members of the same natal group

Jennifer L. Sanderson, Jinliang Wang, Emma I. K. Vitikainen, Michael A. Cant & Hazel J. Nichols
Inbreeding and inbreeding avoidance are key factors in the evolution of animal societies, influencing dispersal and reproductive strategies which can affect relatedness structure and helping behaviours. In cooperative breeding systems, individuals typically avoid inbreeding through reproductive restraint and/or dispersing to breed outside their natal group. However, where groups contain multiple potential mates of varying relatedness, strategies of kin recognition and mate choice may be favoured. Here, we investigate male mate choice and female control of...

Data from: Cambrian cinctan echinoderms shed light on feeding in the ancestral deuterostome

Imran A. Rahman, Samuel Zamora, Peter L. Falkingham & Jeremy C. Phillips
Reconstructing the feeding mode of the latest common ancestor of deuterostomes is key to elucidating the early evolution of feeding in chordates and allied phyla; however, it is debated whether the ancestral deuterostome was a tentaculate feeder or a pharyngeal filter feeder. To address this, we evaluated the hydrodynamics of feeding in a group of fossil stem-group echinoderms (cinctans) using computational fluid dynamics. We simulated water flow past three-dimensional digital models of a Cambrian fossil...

Data from: Downsizing a giant: re-evaluating Dreadnoughtus body mass

Karl T. Bates, Peter L. Falkingham, Sophie Macaulay, Charlotte Brassey & Susannah C. R. Maidment
Estimates of body mass often represent the founding assumption on which biomechanical and macroevolutionary hypotheses are based. Recently, a scaling equation was applied to a newly discovered titanosaurian sauropod dinosaur (Dreadnoughtus), yielding a 59 300 kg body mass estimate for this animal. Herein, we use a modelling approach to examine the plausibility of this mass estimate for Dreadnoughtus. We find that 59 300 kg for Dreadnoughtus is highly implausible and demonstrate that masses above 40...

Data from: Heterochromatin Protein 1β (HP1β) has distinct functions and distinct nuclear distribution in pluripotent versus differentiated cells

Anna Mattout, Yair Aaronson, Badi Sri Sailaja, Edupuganti V. Raghu Ram, Arigela Harikumar, Jan-Philipp Mallm, Kae Hwan Sim, Malka Nissim-Rafinia, Emmanuelle Supper, Prim B. Singh, Siu Kwan Sze, Susan M. Gasser, Karsten Rippe & Eran Meshorer
Background: Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have the unique ability to differentiate into every cell type and to self-renew. These characteristics correlate with a distinct nuclear architecture, epigenetic signatures enriched for active chromatin marks and hyperdynamic binding of structural chromatin proteins. Recently, several chromatin-related proteins have been shown to regulate ESC pluripotency and/or differentiation, yet the role of the major heterochromatin proteins in pluripotency is unknown. Results: Here we identify Heterochromatin Protein 1β (HP1β) as...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    7

Affiliations

  • Liverpool John Moores University
    7
  • Universidade Federal de Santa Maria
    1
  • Friedrich Miescher Institute
    1
  • Royal Veterinary College
    1
  • University of Manchester
    1
  • Nanyang Technological University
    1
  • University of New England
    1
  • Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul
    1
  • Zoological Society of London
    1
  • Hebrew University of Jerusalem
    1