3 Works

Data from: Drosophila studies support a role for a presynaptic synaptotagmin mutation in a human congenital myasthenic syndrome

Mallory C. Shields, Matthew R. Bowers, McKenzie M. Fulcer, Madelyn K. Bollig, Patrick J. Rock, Bryan R. Sutton, Alysia D. Vrailas-Mortimer, Hanns Lochmüller, Roger G. Whittaker, Rita Horvath & Noreen E. Reist
During chemical transmission, the function of synaptic proteins must be coordinated to efficiently release neurotransmitter. Synaptotagmin 2, the Ca2+ sensor for fast, synchronized neurotransmitter release at the human neuromuscular junction, has recently been implicated in a dominantly inherited congenital myasthenic syndrome associated with a non-progressive motor neuropathy. In one family, a proline residue within the C2B Ca2+-binding pocket of synaptotagmin is replaced by a leucine. The functional significance of this residue has not been investigated...

Data from: Species divergence in offspring begging and parental provisioning is linked to nutritional dependency

Alexandra Capodeanu-Nägler, Anne-Katrin Eggert, Heiko Vogel, Scott K. Sakaluk & Sandra Steiger
In animal species in which parents provide food to their dependent young, offspring often display conspicuous begging signals. These solicitation behaviors are important components of parent–offspring communication, but it is currently unclear how they and the parental response covary with offspring dependency on parental food provisioning across species. Burying beetles (Nicrophorus) are well known for providing elaborate biparental care, including provisioning of begging larvae. By using a multispecies approach, we show that larval begging intensity,...

Data from: Immunocompetence in a long-lived ectothermic vertebrate is temperature dependent but shows no decline in older adults

Laura M. Zimmerman, Amanda Wilson Carter, Rachel M. Bowden & Laura A. Vogel
1. Temperature affects nearly all aspects of the physiology of ectotherms, including their ability to mount an immune response. Typically, the ectothermic vertebrate immune system can respond over a wide range of temperatures, but there is a species-specific temperature at which responses are strongest, with impaired responses above and below this threshold. In long-lived ectotherms, aging could also influence the ability to respond to temperature changes as immunosenecence, the functional decrease in immune function with...

Registration Year

  • 2017
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Illinois State University
    3
  • Millikin University
    1
  • Newcastle University
    1
  • Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology
    1
  • University of Ulm
    1
  • Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
    1
  • Colorado State University
    1
  • University of Denver
    1