336 Works

Data from: Phylogenetic signal in module composition and species connectivity in compartmentalized host-parasite networks

Boris R. Krasnov, Miguel A. Fortuna, David Mouillot, Irina S. Khokhlova, Georgy I. Shenbrot & Robert Poulin
Across different taxa, networks of mutualistic or antagonistic interactions show consistent architecture. Most networks are modular, with modules being distinct species subsets connected mainly with each other and having few connections to other modules. We investigate the phylogenetic relatedness of species within modules and whether a phylogenetic signal is detectable in the within- and among module connectivity of species using 27 mammal-flea networks from the Palaearctic. In the 24 networks that were modular, closely-related hosts...

Data from: Stability of the gorilla microbiome despite simian immunodeficiency virus infection

Andrew H. Moeller, Martine Peeters, Ahidjo Ayouba, Eitel Mpoudi Ngole, Amadine Esteban, Beatrice H. Hahn & Howard Ochman
Simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) have been discovered in over 45 primate species; however, the pathogenic potential of most SIV strains remains unknown due to difficulties inherent in observing wild populations. Because those SIV infections that are pathogenic have been shown to induce changes in the host's gut microbiome, monitoring the microbiota present in faecal samples can provide a noninvasive means for studying the effects of SIV infection on the health of wild-living primates. Here, we...

Data from: Pollution breaks down the genetic architecture of life history traits in Caenorhabditis elegans

Morgan Dutilleul, Benoit Goussen, Jean-Marc Bonzom, Simon Galas & Denis Réale
When pollution occurs in an environment, populations present suffer numerous negative and immediate effects on their life history traits. Their evolutionary potential to live in a highly stressful environment will depend on the selection pressure strengths and on the genetic structure, the trait heritability, and the genetic correlations between them. If expression of this structure changes in a stressful environment, it becomes necessary to quantify these changes to estimate the evolutionary potential of the population...

Data from: The impact of insecticide resistance on Culex pipiens immunity

Julien Vézilier, Antoine Nicot, Julien De Lorgeril, Sylvain Gandon & Ana Rivero
Because of their role as vectors of diseases, the evolution of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes has been intensively investigated. Insecticide resistance is associated to a wide range of pleiotropic effects on several key life history traits of mosquitoes such as longevity and behavior. However, despite its potential implications in pathogen transmission, the effects of insecticide resistance on mosquito immunity have received little, if any, attention. Here, we investigate the impact of insecticide resistance in Culex...

Data from: Sibship effects on dispersal behaviour in a preindustrial human population

Aïda Nitsch, Virpi Lummaa & Charlotte Faurie
Understanding dispersal behaviour and its determinants is critical for studies on life-history maximizing strategies. Although many studies have investigated the causes of dispersal, few have focused on the importance of sibship, despite that sibling interactions are predicted to lead to intrafamilial differences in dispersal patterns. Using a large demographic data set from pre-industrial Finland (n = 9000), we tested whether the sex-specific probability of dispersal depended on the presence of same-sex or opposite-sex elder siblings...

Data from: Phage selection for bacterial cheats leads to population decline

Marie Vasse, Clara Torres-Barceló & Michael E. Hochberg
While predators and parasites are known for their effects on bacterial population biology, their impact on the dynamics of bacterial social evolution remains largely unclear. Siderophores are iron-chelating molecules that are key to the survival of certain bacterial species in iron-limited environments, but their production can be subject to cheating by non-producing phenotypes. In a selection experiment conducted over c 20 bacterial generations and involving 140 populations of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, we...

Data from: From randomness to traplining: a framework for the study of routine movement behavior

Louise Riotte-Lambert, Simon Benhamou & Simon Chamaillé-Jammes
Memory allows many animals to benefit from the spatial predictability of their environment by revisiting known profitable places. Travel route optimization or resource acquisition constraints usually lead to repeated sequences of visits, which may have major evolutionary and ecological implications. However, the study of this behavior has been impaired by a lack of concepts and methodologies. We here formally define routine movement behavior, provide an index that quantifies the degree of repetitiveness in movement sequences...

Data from: Body reserves mediate trade-offs between life history traits: new insights from small pelagic fish reproduction

Pablo Brosset, Josep Lloret, Marta Muñoz, Christian Fauvel, Elisabeth Van Beveren, Virginie Marques, Jean-Marc Fromentin, Frédéric Ménard & Claire Saraux
Limited resources in the environment prevent individuals from simultaneously maximizing all life-history traits, resulting in trade-offs. In particular, the cost of reproduction is well known to negatively affect energy investment in growth and maintenance. Here, we investigated these trade-offs during contrasting periods of high versus low fish size and body condition (before/after 2008) in the Gulf of Lions. Female reproductive allocation and performance in anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) and sardine (Sardina pilchardus) were examined based on...

Data from: Unexpected high vulnerability of functions in wilderness areas: evidence from coral reef fishes

Stephanie D'agata, Laurent Vigliola, Nickolas A.J. Graham, Laurent Wantiez, Valeriano Parravicini, Sébastien Villéger, Gérard Mou-Tham, Phillipe Frolla, Alan M. Friedlander, Michel Kulbicki, David Mouillot & Nicholas A. J. Graham
High species richness is thought to support the delivery of multiple ecosystem functions and services under changing environments. Yet, some species might perform unique functional roles while others are redundant. Thus, the benefits of high species richness in maintaining ecosystem functioning are uncertain if functions have little redundancy, potentially leading to high vulnerability of functions. We studied the natural propensity of assemblages to be functionally buffered against loss prior to fishing activities, using functional trait...

Species diversity and composition drive the aesthetic value of coral reef fish assemblages

Nicolas Mouquet, Anne Sophie Tribot, Julie Deter, Thomas Claverie, François Guillhaumon & Sebastien Villéger
Data set corresponding to the manuscript : "Species diversity and composition drive the aesthetic value of coral reef fish assemblages".

Data from: Mapping and explaining wolf recolonization in France using dynamic occupancy models and opportunistic data

Julie Louvrier, Christophe Duchamp, Valentin Lauret, Eric Marboutin, Sarah Cubaynes, Rémi Choquet, Christian Miquel & Olivier Gimenez
While large carnivores are recovering in Europe, assessing their distributions can help to predict and mitigate conflicts with human activities. Because they are highly mobile, elusive and live at very low density, modeling their distributions presents several challenges due to i) their imperfect detectability, ii) their dynamic ranges over time and iii) their monitoring at large scales consisting mainly of opportunistic data without a formal measure of the sampling effort. Here, we focused on wolves...

Data from: Adaptation costs to constant and alternating polluted environments

Morgan Dutilleul, Denis Reale, Benoit Goussen, Catherine Lecomte, Simon Galas & Jean-Marc Bonzom
Some populations quickly adapt to strong and novel selection pressures caused by anthropogenic stressors. However, this short-term evolutionary response to novel and harsh environmental conditions may lead to adaptation costs, and evaluating these costs is important if we want to understand the evolution of resistance to anthropogenic stressors. In this experimental evolution study, we exposed Caenorhabditis elegans populations to uranium (U populations), salt (NaCl populations), alternating uranium/salt treatments (U/NaCl populations), and to a control environment...

Speciation history of European (Anguilla anguilla) and American eel (A. rostrata), analyzed using genomic data

Natacha Nikolic, Shenglin Liu, Magnus W. Jacobsen, Bjarni Jónsson, Louis Bernatchez, Pierre-Alexandre Gagnaire & Michael M. Hansen
Speciation in the ocean could differ from terrestrial environments due to fewer barriers to gene flow. Hence, sympatric speciation might be common, with American and European eel being candidates for exemplifying this. They show disjunct continental distributions on both sides of the Atlantic, but spawn in overlapping regions of the Sargasso Sea from where juveniles are advected to North American, European and North African coasts. Hybridization and introgression is known to occur, with hybrids almost...

Data from: Beyond dispersal versus philopatry? Alternative behavioural tactics of juvenile roe deer in a heterogeneous landscape

Delphine Ducros, Nicolas Morellet, Rémi Patin, Kamal Atmeh, Lucie Debeffe, Bruno Cargnelutti, Yannick Chaval, Bruno Lourtet, Aurélie Coulon & A. J. Mark Hewison
Although inter-individual heterogeneity in many aspects of dispersal behaviour is widely reported, this key life-history trait is predominantly modelled as a dichotomous state of philopatry vs. dispersal. The increasing body of evidence for dispersal syndromes (i.e. a suite of correlated morphological, behavioural, and life-history traits associated with dispersal) implies substantial but, to date, undocumented individual heterogeneity in behavioural tactics during dispersal. Using a large sample (N = 154) of GPS monitored juvenile roe deer (Capreolus...

Transparent experiments: releasing data from mechanical tests on three dimensional hydrogel sphere packings

Jonathan Barés, Nicolas Brodu, Hu Zheng & Joshua Dijksman
We describe here experiments on the mechanics of hydrogel particle packings from the Behringer lab, performed between 2012 and 2015. These experiments quantify the evolution of all contact forces inside soft particle packings exposed to compression, shear, and the intrusion of a large intruder. The experimental set-ups and processes are presented and the data are concomitantly published in a repository.

Data from: Shared evolutionary origin of MHC polymorphism in sympatric lemurs

Eva Kaesler, Peter M. Kappeler, Markus Brameier, Janina Demeler, Cornelia Kraus, Josué H. Rakotoniaina, Anni M. Hämäläinen & Elise Huchard
Genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) play a central role in adaptive immune responses of vertebrates. They exhibit remarkable polymorphism, often crossing species boundaries with similar alleles or allelic motifs shared across species. This pattern may reflect parallel parasite-mediated selective pressures, either favouring the long maintenance of ancestral MHC allelic lineages across successive speciation events by balancing selection (‘trans-species polymorphism’), or alternatively favouring the independent emergence of functionally similar alleles post-speciation via convergent evolution....

Data from: Demonstrating multiple benefits from periodically harvested fisheries closures

Jordan S. Goetze, Joachim Claudet, Fraser Januchowski-Hartley, Timothy J. Langlois, Shaun K. Wilson, Crow White, Rebecca Weeks & Stacy D. Jupiter
1.Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) are one of the most common forms of fisheries management in Melanesia, demonstrating multiple objectives, including sustaining fish stocks and increasing catch efficiency to support small-scale fisheries. No studies have comprehensively assessed their ability to provide short-term fisheries benefits across the entire harvest regime. 2.We present a novel analytical framework to guide a meta-analysis and assist future research in conceptualizing and assessing the potential of PHCs to deliver benefits for multiple...

Data from: Great tits and the city: distribution of genomic diversity and gene-environment associations along an urbanization gradient

Charles Perrier, Ana Lozano Del Campo, Marta Szulkin, Virginie Demeyrier, Arnaud Gregoire & Anne Charmantier
Urbanization is a growing concern challenging the evolutionary potential of wild populations by reducing genetic diversity and imposing new selection regimes affecting many key fitness traits. However, genomic footprints of urbanization have received little attention so far. Using RAD sequencing, we investigated the genome-wide effects of urbanization on neutral and adaptive genomic diversity in 140 adult great tits Parus major collected in locations with contrasted urbanization levels (from a natural forest to highly urbanized areas...

An effect size statistical framework for investigating sexual dimorphism in non-avian dinosaurs and other extinct taxa

Evan Saitta, Maximilian Stockdale, Nicholas Longrich, Vincent Bonhomme, Michael Benton, Innes Cuthill & Peter Makovicky
Despite reports of sexual dimorphism in extinct taxa, such claims in non-avian dinosaurs have been underrepresented recently (~the last decade) and often criticized. Since dimorphism is widespread in sexually reproducing organisms today, underrepresentation might suggest either methodological shortcomings or that this diverse group exhibited highly unusual reproductive biology. Univariate significance testing, especially for bimodality, is ineffective and prone to false negatives. Species recognition and mutual sexual selection hypotheses, therefore, may not be required to explain...

Data from: The multilocus multispecies coalescent: a flexible new model of gene family evolution

Qiuyi Li, Celine Scornavacca, Nicolas Galtier & Yao-Ban Chan
Incomplete lineage sorting (ILS), the interaction between coalescence and speciation, can generate incongruence between gene trees and species trees, as can gene duplication (D), transfer (T) and loss (L). These processes are usually modelled independently, but in reality, ILS can affect gene copy number polymorphism, i.e., interfere with DTL. This has been previously recognised, but not treated in a satisfactory way, mainly because DTL events are naturally modelled forward-in-time, while ILS is naturally modelled backwards-in-time...

Data from: Aggression supersedes individual oxygen demand to drive group air-breathing in a social catfish

Shaun S. Killen, Andrew J. Esbaugh, Nicolas Martins, F. Tadeau Rantin, David J. McKenzie, Nicolas F. Martins & F. Tadeu Rantin
1) Group-living is widespread among animals and comes with numerous costs and benefits. To date, research examining group-living has focused on trade-offs surrounding foraging, while other forms of resource acquisition have been largely overlooked. 2) Air breathing has evolved in many fish lineages, allowing animals to obtain oxygen in hypoxic aquatic environments. Breathing air increases the threat of predation, so some species perform group air breathing, to reduce individual risk. Within species, air breathing can...

Temporally consistent species differences in parasite infection but no evidence for rapid parasite-mediated speciation in Lake Victoria cichlid fish

Tiziana P Gobbin, Maarten PM Vanhove, Antoine Pariselle, Ton GG Groothuis, Martine E Maan & Ole Seehausen
Parasites may have strong eco-evolutionary interactions with their hosts. Consequently, they may contribute to host diversification. The radiation of cichlid fish in Lake Victoria provides a good model to study the role of parasites in the early stages of speciation. We investigated patterns of macroparasite infection in a community of 17 sympatric cichlids from a recent radiation and 2 older species from 2 non-radiating lineages, to explore the opportunity for parasite-mediated speciation. Host species had...

Data from: Native drivers of fish life history traits are lost during the invasion process

Rodolphe Gozlan, Eva Zahorskae, Emira CHERIF, Takashi Asaeda, Robert Britton, Cha-Ho Chang, To Hong, Rafael Miranda, Jiri Musil, Meta Povz, Serhan Tarkan, Elena Tricarico, Tricia Trichkova, Hugo Verreycken, Andrej Weiperth, Andrej Witkowski, Lluis Zamora, Irene Zweimuller, Ya-Hui Zhao, Hamid Esmaeili & Marine Combe
Rapid adaptation to global change can counter vulnerability of species to population declines and extinction. Theoretically, under such circumstances both genetic variation and phenotypic plasticity can maintain population fitness, but empirical support for this is currently limited. Here, we aim to characterise the role of environmental and genetic diversity, and their prior evolutionary history (via haplogroup profiles) in shaping patterns of life history traits during biological invasion. Data were derived from both genetic and life...

Diurnal timing of nonmigratory movement by birds: the importance of foraging spatial scales

Julie Mallon, Marlee Tucker, Annalea Beard, , Keith Bildstein, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, John Brzorad, Evan Buechley, Javier Bustamante, Carlos Carrapato, José Castillo-Guerrero, Elizabeth Clingham, Mark Desholm, Christopher DeSorbo, Robert Domenech, Hayley Douglas, Olivier Duriez, Peter Enggist, Nina Farwig, Wolfgang Fiedler, Anna Gagliardo, Clara García-Ripollés, Juan Antonio Gil, Morgan Gilmour, Roi Harel … & Bill Fagan
Timing of activity can reveal an organism’s efforts to optimize foraging either by minimizing energy loss through passive movement or by maximizing energetic gain through foraging. Here, we assess whether signals of either of these strategies are detectable in the timing of activity of daily, local movements by birds. We compare the similarities of timing of movement activity among species using six temporal variables: start of activity relative to sunrise, end of activity relative to...

Data from: Influence of habitat availability and fire disturbance on the northern range boundary of eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis L.)

Bronwyn Rayfield, Véronique Paul, Francine Tremblay, Marie-Josée Fortin, Christelle Hely & Yves Bergeron
Aim Non-climatic constraints on species northern range boundaries are often overlooked in attempts to predict climate-induced range shifts. Here, we examined the effects of habitat availability and fire disturbance on the distribution of eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis L.) at the northern boundary of its range. Location North-western Quebec, Canada (46-51° N and 74-79° W) Methods We used forest inventory data (n=4,987) to characterize white-cedar habitat based on edaphic and topographic conditions at sampled sites...

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