11 Works

Data from: Developing nuclear DNA phylogenetic markers in the angiosperm genus Leucadendron (Proteaceae): a next-generation sequencing transcriptomic approach

Jeanne Tonnabel, Isabelle Olivieri, Agnès Mignot, Tony Rebelo, Fabienne Justy, Sylvain Santoni, Stéfanie Caroli, Laure Sauné, Olivier Bouchez, Emmanuel J. P. Douzery, Emmanuel J.P. Douzery & Anthony Rebelo
Despite the recent advances in generating molecular data, reconstructing species-level phylogenies for non-models groups remains a challenge. The use of a number of independent genes is required to resolve phylogenetic relationships, especially for groups displaying low polymorphism. In such cases, low-copy nuclear exons and non-coding regions, such as 3′ untranslated regions (3′-UTRs) or introns, constitute a potentially interesting source of nuclear DNA variation. Here, we present a methodology meant to identify new nuclear orthologous markers...

Data from: Variation in habitat connectivity generates positive correlations between species and genetic diversity in a metacommunity

Thomas Lamy, Philippe Jarne, Fabien Laroche, Jean-Pierre Pointier, Géraldine Huth, Adeline Segard, Patrice David & J.-P. Pointier
An increasing number of studies are simultaneously investigating species diversity (SD) and genetic diversity (GD) in the same systems, looking for ‘species– genetic diversity correlations’ (SGDCs). From negative to positive SGDCs have been reported, but studies have generally not quantified the processes underlying these correlations. They were also mostly conducted at large biogeographical scales or in recently degraded habitats. Such correlations have not been looked for in natural networks of connected habitat fragments (metacommunities), and...

Data from: Stochastic environmental fluctuations drive epidemiology in experimental host–parasite metapopulations

Alison B. Duncan, Andrew Gonzalez & Oliver Kaltz
Environmental fluctuations are important for parasite spread and persistence. However, the effects of the spatial and temporal structure of environmental fluctuations on host–parasite dynamics are not well understood. Temporal fluctuations can be random but positively autocorrelated, such that the environment is similar to the recent past (red noise), or random and uncorrelated with the past (white noise). We imposed red or white temporal temperature fluctuations on experimental metapopulations of Paramecium caudatum, experiencing an epidemic of...

Data from: Sexual selection against natural hybrids may contribute to reinforcement in a house mouse hybrid zone

Yasmin Latour, Guila Ganem, Carole M. Smadja, Pierre Boursot, Pierre Caminade & Marco Perriat-Sanguinet
Sexual selection may hinder gene flow across contact zones when hybrid recognition signals are discriminated against. We tested this hypothesis in a unimodal hybrid zone between Mus musculus musculus and Mus musculus domesticus where a pattern of reinforcement was described and lower hybrid fitness documented. We presented mice from the border of the hybrid zone with a choice between opposite sex urine from the same subspecies versus hybrids sampled in different locations across the zone....

Data from: Home loving boreal hare mitochondria survived several invasions in Iberia: the relative roles of recurrent hybridisation and allele surfing

José Melo-Ferreira, Liliana Farelo, Helder Freitas, Franz Suchentrunk, Pierre Boursot & Paulo C. Alves
Genetic introgression from a resident species into an invading close relative can result from repeated hybridisation along the invasion front and/or allele surfing on the expansion wave. Cases where the phenomenon is massive and systematic, such as for hares (genus Lepus) in Iberia, would be best explained by recurrent hybridisation but this is difficult to prove since the donor populations are generally extinct. In the Pyrenean foothills, Lepus europaeus presumably replaced Lepus granatensis recently and...

Data from: Mitochondrial haplotypes indicate parapatric-like phylogeographic structure in blue-spotted maskray (Neotrygon kuhlii) from the Coral Triangle region

Irma S. Arlyza, Kang-Ning Shen, Jean-Dominique Durand & Philippe Borsa
Phylogeographic structure was investigated in the blue-spotted maskray, Neotrygon kuhlii, focusing on the Coral Triangle region. We used as genetic marker a 519-bp fragment of the cytochrome c-oxidase subunit I (COI) gene, sequenced in a total of 147 individuals from 26 sampling locations. The parsimony network of COI haplotypes was split into seven distinct clades within the Coral Triangle region. Different clades had exclusive but contiguous geographic distributions, indicating parapatric-like phylogeographic structure. Strong genetic differences...

Data from: Back to the future: evolving bacteriophages to increase their effectiveness against the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

Alex Betts, Marie Vasse, Oliver Kaltz & Michael E. Hochberg
Antibiotic resistance is becoming increasingly problematic for the treatment of infectious disease in both humans and livestock. The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is often found to be resistant to multiple antibiotics and causes high patient mortality in hospitals. Bacteriophages represent a potential option to combat pathogenic bacteria through their application in phage therapy. Here we capitalize on previous studies showing how evolution may increase phage infection capacity relative to ancestral genotypes. We passaged four different phage...

Data from: Convergence of gut microbiomes in myrmecophagous mammals

Frédéric Delsuc, Jessica L. Metcalf, Laura Wegener Parfrey, Se Jin Song, Antonio González & Rob Knight
Mammals have diversified into many dietary niches. Specialized myrmecophagous (ant- and termite-eating) placental mammals represent a textbook example of evolutionary convergence driven by extreme diet specialization. Armadillos, anteaters, aardvarks, pangolins and aardwolves thus provide a model system for understanding the potential role of gut microbiota in the convergent adaptation to myrmecophagy. Here, we expand upon previous mammalian gut microbiome studies by using high-throughput barcoded Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to characterize the composition...

Data from: Quantifying the effects of migration and mutation on adaptation and demography in spatially heterogeneous environments

Florence Débarre, Ophélie Ronce & Sylvain Gandon
How do mutation and gene flow influence population persistence, niche expansion, and local adaptation in spatially heterogeneous environments? In this article, we analyse a demographic and evolutionary model of adaptation to an environment containing two habitats in equal frequencies, and we bridge the gap between different theoretical frameworks. Qualitatively, our model yields four qualitative types of outcomes: (i) global extinction of the population (ii) adaptation to one habitat only, but also adaptation to both habitats...

Data from: Steep clines within a highly permeable genome across a hybrid zone between two subspecies of the European rabbit

Miguel Carneiro, Stuart J. E. Baird, Sandra Afonso, Esther Ramirez, Pedro Tarroso, Henrique Teotonio, Rafael Villafuerte, Michael W. Nachman & Nuno Ferrand
Maintenance of genetic distinction in the face of gene flow is an important aspect of the speciation process. Here, we provide a detailed spatial and genetic characterization of a hybrid zone between two subspecies of the European rabbit. We examined patterns of allele frequency change for 22 markers located on the autosomes, X-chromosome, Y-chromosome, and mtDNA in 1078 individuals sampled across the hybrid zone. While some loci revealed extremely wide clines (w>=300 km) relative to...

Data from: Wolbachia increases susceptibility to Plasmodium infection in a natural system

Flore Zélé, Antoine Nicot, Arnaud Berthomieu, Mylène Weill, Olivier Duron, Ana Rivero & F. Zele
Current views about the impact of Wolbachia on Plasmodium infections are almost entirely based on data regarding artificially transfected mosquitoes. This work has shown that Wolbachia reduces the intensity of Plasmodium infections in mosquitoes, raising the exciting possibility of using Wolbachia to control or limit the spread of malaria. Whether natural Wolbachia infections have the same parasite-inhibiting properties is not yet clear. Wolbachia–mosquito combinations with a long evolutionary history are, however, key for understanding what...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    11

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    11

Affiliations

  • University of Montpellier
    11
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    2
  • University of Porto
    2
  • South African National Biodiversity Institute
    1
  • Institute for Game and Wildlife Research
    1
  • Institut de Recherche pour le Développement
    1
  • McGill University
    1
  • University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna
    1
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    1