13 Works

Data from: Partner choice creates fairness in humans

Stéphane Debove, Jean-Baptiste André, Nicolas Baumard & J.-B. Andre
Many studies demonstrate that partner choice has played an important role in the evolution of human cooperation, but little work has tested its impact on the evolution of human fairness. In experiments involving divisions of money, people become either over-generous or over-selfish when they are in competition to be chosen as cooperative partners. Hence, it is difficult to see how partner choice could result in the evolution of fair, equal divisions. Here, we show that...

Data from: Phage selection for bacterial cheats leads to population decline

Marie Vasse, Clara Torres-Barceló & Michael E. Hochberg
While predators and parasites are known for their effects on bacterial population biology, their impact on the dynamics of bacterial social evolution remains largely unclear. Siderophores are iron-chelating molecules that are key to the survival of certain bacterial species in iron-limited environments, but their production can be subject to cheating by non-producing phenotypes. In a selection experiment conducted over c 20 bacterial generations and involving 140 populations of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, we...

Data from: Pollution breaks down the genetic architecture of life history traits in Caenorhabditis elegans

Morgan Dutilleul, Benoit Goussen, Jean-Marc Bonzom, Simon Galas & Denis Réale
When pollution occurs in an environment, populations present suffer numerous negative and immediate effects on their life history traits. Their evolutionary potential to live in a highly stressful environment will depend on the selection pressure strengths and on the genetic structure, the trait heritability, and the genetic correlations between them. If expression of this structure changes in a stressful environment, it becomes necessary to quantify these changes to estimate the evolutionary potential of the population...

Data from: Social learning and the replication process: an experimental investigation

Maxime Derex, Romain Feron, Bernard Godelle & Michel Raymond
Human cultural traits typically result from a gradual process that has been described as analogous to biological evolution. This observation has led pioneering scholars to draw inspiration from population genetics to develop a rigorous and successful theoretical framework of cultural evolution. Social learning, the mechanism allowing information to be transmitted between individuals, has thus been described as a simple replication mechanism. Although useful, the extent to which this idealization appropriately describes the actual social learning...

Data from: Gene expression, chromosome heterogeneity and the fast-X effect in mammals

Linh-Phuong Nguyen, Nicolas Galtier, Benoit Nabholz & L.-P. Nguyen
The higher rate of non-synonymous over synonymous substitutions (dN/dS) of the X chromosome compared with autosomes is often interpreted as a consequence of X hemizygosity. However, other factors, such as gene expression, are also known to vary between X and autosomes. Analysing 4800 orthologues in six mammals, we found that gene expression levels, associated with GC content, fully account for the variation in dN/dS between X and autosomes with no detectable effect of hemizygosity. We...

Data from: Assessing the distribution of disease-bearing rodents in human-modified tropical landscapes

Serge Morand, Frédéric Bordes, Kim Blasdell, Shai Pilosof, Jean-François Cornu, Kittipong Chaisiri, Yannick Chaval, Jean-François Cosson, Julien Claude, Tristan Feyfant, Vincent Herbreteau, Stéphane Dupuy & Annelise Tran
1. We tested how habitat structure and fragmentation affect the spatial distribution of common murine rodents inhabiting human-dominated landscapes in southeast Asia. The spatial distribution patterns observed for each rodent species were then used to assess how changes in habitat structure may potentially affect the risk of several major rodent-borne diseases. 2. For this analysis, we used an extensive geo-referenced database containing details of rodents trapped from seven sites in Thailand, Cambodia and Lao PDR....

Data from: Escape of spring frost and disease through phenological variations in oak populations along elevation gradients

Cécile Françoise Dantec, Hugo Ducasse, Xavier Capdevielle, Olivier Fabreguettes, Sylvain Delzon & Marie-Laure Desprez-Loustau
1. The timing of tree flushing follows strong phenotypic and genetic clines across environmental gradients. It may be seen as an adaptive response to abiotic (escape of spring frost and maximizing growing season length) and biotic (escape of pest and disease) hazards. However, few studies have investigated jointly both types of hazards. 2. We assessed exposure to both abiotic (spring frost) and biotic (powdery mildew) hazards within and between sessile oak populations along elevation gradients,...

Data from: Population genomic footprints of fine-scale differentiation between habitats in Mediterranean blue tits

Marta Szulkin, Pierre-Alexandre Gagnaire, Nicolas Bierne, Anne Charmantier & P.-A. Gagnaire
Linking population genetic variation to the spatial heterogeneity of the environment is of fundamental interest to evolutionary biology and ecology, in particular when phenotypic differences between populations are observed at biologically small spatial scales. Here, we applied restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq) to test whether phenotypically differentiated populations of wild blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) breeding in a highly heterogeneous environment exhibit genetic structure related to habitat type. Using 12106 SNPs in 197 individuals from deciduous...

Data from: Functional responses of multi-taxa communities to disturbance and stress gradients in a restored floodplain

Bertrand Fournier, François Gillet, Renée-Claire Le Bayon, Edward A. D. Mitchell & Marco Moretti
1. Trait-based approaches can reveal the mechanisms through which disturbances or stress impact communities, allowing comparisons of the role of different mechanisms in shaping communities among taxonomic groups. Such information can lead to higher comparability, transferability and predictability of the outcome of restoration projects. However, multitaxa trait-based approaches were rarely used in the context of ecosystem restoration. 2. We investigated the responses to environmental gradients of seven taxa (vascular plants, staphylinid and carabid beetles, spiders,...

Data from: Reactive responses of zebras to lion encounters shape their predator-prey space game at large scale

Nicolas Courbin, Andrew J. Loveridge, David W. Macdonald, Hervé Fritz, Marion Valeix, Edwin T. Makuwe & Simon Chamaillé-Jammes
The predator–prey space game and the costs associated with risk effects are affected by prey 1) proactive adjustments (when prey modify their behaviour in response to an a priori assessment of the risk level) and 2) reactive adjustments (when prey have detected an immediate threat). Proactive adjustments are generally well-studied, whereas the frequency, strength and duration of reactive adjustments remain largely unknown. We studied the space use and habitat selection of GPS-collared zebras Equus quagga...

Data from: A life-cycle model of human social groups produces a u-shaped distribution in group size

Gul Deniz Salali, Harvey Whitehouse & Michael E. Hochberg
One of the central puzzles in the study of sociocultural evolution is how and why transitions from small-scale human groups to large-scale, hierarchically more complex ones occurred. Here we develop a spatially explicit agent-based model as a first step towards understanding the ecological dynamics of small and large-scale human groups. By analogy with the interactions between single-celled and multicellular organisms, we build a theory of group lifecycles as an emergent property of single cell demographic...

Data from: Local inter-species introgression is the main cause of extreme levels of intra-specific differentiation in mussels

Christelle Fraïsse, Khalid Belkhir, John J. Welch & Nicolas Bierne
Structured populations, and replicated zones of contact between species, are an ideal opportunity to study regions of the genome with unusual levels of differentiation; and these can illuminate the genomic architecture of species isolation, and the spread of adaptive alleles across species ranges. Here, we investigated the effects of gene flow on divergence and adaptation in the Mytilus complex of species, including replicated parental populations in quite distant geographical locations. We used target enrichment sequencing...

Data from: Rapid evolutionary responses of life history traits to different experimentally-induced pollution in Caenorhabditis elegans

Morgan Dutilleul, Jean-Marc Bonzom, Catherine Lecomte, Benoit Goussen, Fabrice Daian, Simon Galas & Denis Réale
Background Anthropogenic disturbances can lead to intense selection pressures on traits and very rapid evolutionary changes. Evolutionary responses to environmental changes, in turn, reflect changes in the genetic structure of the traits, accompanied by a reduction of evolutionary potential of the populations under selection. Assessing the effects of pollutants on the evolutionary responses and on the genetic structure of populations is thus important to understanding the mechanisms that entail specialization to novel environmental conditions or...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    13

Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Montpellier
    13
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    8
  • University of Oxford
    3
  • Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire
    2
  • University of Quebec at Montreal
    1
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    1
  • University of Neuchâtel
    1
  • PSL Research University
    1
  • University of Cambridge
    1
  • Santa Fe Institute
    1