98 Works

Intensified tuberculosis treatment to reduce the mortality of HIV-infected and uninfected patients with tuberculosis meningitis (INTENSE-TBM): study protocol for a phase III randomized controlled trial

Thomas Maitre, Maryline Bonnet, Alexandra Calmy, Mihaja Raberahona, Rivonirina Andry Rakotoarivelo, Niaina Rakotosamimanana, Juan Ambrosioni, José M. Miró, Pierre Debeaudrap, Conrad Muzoora, Angharad Davis, Graeme Meintjes, Sean Wasserman, Robert Wilkinson, Serge Eholié, Frédéric Ello Nogbou, Maria-Camilla Calvo-Cortes, Corine Chazallon, Vanessa Machault, Xavier Anglaret & Fabrice Bonnet
Abstract Background Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is the most lethal and disabling form of tuberculosis (TB), particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Current anti-TB treatment is poorly effective since TBM mortality reaches 40% in HIV-negative patients and up to 70% in HIV-co-infected patients. To reduce TBM-induced morbidity and mortality, the INTENSE-TBM trial evaluates two interventions in both HIV-infected and uninfected patients: an anti-TB treatment intensification using oral high-dose rifampicin (35 mg/kg daily) and linezolid (1200 mg daily and...

The ICDP Oman Drilling Project – Implications from drill core GT1 on magmatic processes beneath fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges

Dominik Mock , David Axford Neave , Samuel Müller , Dieter Garbe-Schönberg , Benoit Ildefonse , Jürgen Koepke & Oman Drilling Project Science Team
A key aim of the ICDP Oman Drilling Project is to constrain magmatic processes beneath fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges. Several drill cores from the Samail ophiolite (Oman), which is regarded as the best-preserved piece of ancient oceanic lithosphere on land, were obtained. Drill core GT1 covers about 400 m from the layered gabbro section between ~1200 and 800 m above the mantle transition zone (maM). The vast majority of the samples recovered are (olivine-) gabbros with...

Cross-scale drivers of woody plant species commonness and rarity in the Brazilian drylands

Bruno X. Pinho, Diego Trindade, Carlos Peres, Davi Jamelli, Renato A. F. De Lima, Elâine M.S. Ribeiro, Inara R. Leal & Marcelo Tabarelli
Aim: Locally abundant species are typically widespread, while locally scarce species are geographically restricted – the so-called abundance-occupancy relationships (AORs). AORs help explain the drivers of species rarity and community assembly, but little is known about how variation around such relationships is driven by species traits and niche-based processes, particularly in tropical woody plants. We tested the hypothesis that AORs in tropical dryland woody plants are positive and mediated by niche and functional traits along...

Host traits measurements after evolution with or without parasites during range expansions

Giacomo Zilio
Rapid evolutionary changes during range expansions can lead to the divergence between range core and front populations, with the emergence of dispersal syndromes. Besides intraspecific effects, range expansions may be impacted by interspecific interactions such as parasitism. Yet, despite the potentially large impact of parasites imposing additional selective pressures on the host, their role on range expansions remains largely unexplored. Here, we investigated whether parasites affect the evolution of host dispersal syndromes during spatial spread....

Trait functional diversity explains mixture effects on litter decomposition at the arid end of a climate gradient

Rafaella Canessa, Liesbeth Van Den Brink, Monica Berdugo, Stephan Hattenschwiler, Rodrigo Rios, Alfredo Saldana, Katja Tielboerger & Maaike Bader
Litter decomposition is controlled by climate, litter quality and decomposer communities. Because the decomposition of specific litter types is also influenced by the properties of adjacent types, mixing litter types may result in non-additive effects on overall decomposition rates. The strength of these effects seems to depend on the litter functional diversity. However, it is unclear which functional traits or combination of traits explain litter mixture effects and if these depend on the range of...

Additional file 2 of Association between in-ICU red blood cells transfusion and 1-year mortality in ICU survivors

Alice Blet, Joel B. McNeil, Julie Josse, Bernard Cholley, Raphaël Cinotti, Gad Cotter, Agnès Dauvergne, Beth Davison, Kévin Duarte, Jacques Duranteau, Marie-Céline Fournier, Etienne Gayat, Samir Jaber, Sigismond Lasocki, Thomas Merkling, Katell Peoc’h, Imke Mayer, Malha Sadoune, Pierre-François Laterre, Romain Sonneville, Lorraine Ware, Alexandre Mebazaa & Antoine Kimmoun
Additional file 2: Supplemental Text.

Do large-scale associations in birds imply biotic interactions or environmental filtering?

Merja Elo, Mira H. Kajanus, Jere Tolvanen, Vincent Devictor, Jukka T. Forsman, Aleksi Lehikoinen, Mikko Mönkkönen, James T. Thorson, Maximilian G. R. Vollstädt & Sami M. Kivelä
Aim: There has been a wide interest in the effect of biotic interactions on species’ occurrences and abundances at large spatial scales, coupled with a vast development of the statistical methods to study them. Still, the evidence whether the effects of within-trophic level biotic interactions (e.g. competition and heterospecific attraction) are discernible beyond local scales remains inconsistent. Here, we present a novel hypothesis-testing framework based on joint dynamic species distribution models (JDSDMs) and functional trait...

Relict lineages with extreme ecology and physiology: metal hyperaccumulation on ultramafic substrates in New Caledonian Alseuosmineae (Asterales)

Karine Gotty, Gael J. Kergoat, Pierre Jouannais, Vanessa Invernon, Sylvain Merlot & Yohan Pillon
Relict lineages are an important component of biodiversity, but it is unclear under what circumstances these groups persist. A potential example of such a group is the Alseuosmineae (Asterales) of Oceania. This clade contains the three small families – Alseuosmiaceae, Argophyllaceae and Phellinaceae. The clade has highest diversity in New Caledonia, where there are extensive ultramafic substrates, creating an extreme edaphic environment. Using several lines of evidence we aimed to show that Alseuosmineae qualify as...

Additional file 1 of Intensified tuberculosis treatment to reduce the mortality of HIV-infected and uninfected patients with tuberculosis meningitis (INTENSE-TBM): study protocol for a phase III randomized controlled trial

Thomas Maitre, Maryline Bonnet, Alexandra Calmy, Mihaja Raberahona, Rivonirina Andry Rakotoarivelo, Niaina Rakotosamimanana, Juan Ambrosioni, José M. Miró, Pierre Debeaudrap, Conrad Muzoora, Angharad Davis, Graeme Meintjes, Sean Wasserman, Robert Wilkinson, Serge Eholié, Frédéric Ello Nogbou, Maria-Camilla Calvo-Cortes, Corine Chazallon, Vanessa Machault, Xavier Anglaret & Fabrice Bonnet
Additional file 1. Modified MARAIS Score (modified from Marais et al. [27]).

Intensified tuberculosis treatment to reduce the mortality of HIV-infected and uninfected patients with tuberculosis meningitis (INTENSE-TBM): study protocol for a phase III randomized controlled trial

Thomas Maitre, Maryline Bonnet, Alexandra Calmy, Mihaja Raberahona, Rivonirina Andry Rakotoarivelo, Niaina Rakotosamimanana, Juan Ambrosioni, José M. Miró, Pierre Debeaudrap, Conrad Muzoora, Angharad Davis, Graeme Meintjes, Sean Wasserman, Robert Wilkinson, Serge Eholié, Frédéric Ello Nogbou, Maria-Camilla Calvo-Cortes, Corine Chazallon, Vanessa Machault, Xavier Anglaret & Fabrice Bonnet
Abstract Background Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is the most lethal and disabling form of tuberculosis (TB), particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Current anti-TB treatment is poorly effective since TBM mortality reaches 40% in HIV-negative patients and up to 70% in HIV-co-infected patients. To reduce TBM-induced morbidity and mortality, the INTENSE-TBM trial evaluates two interventions in both HIV-infected and uninfected patients: an anti-TB treatment intensification using oral high-dose rifampicin (35 mg/kg daily) and linezolid (1200 mg daily and...

Additional file 2 of Host-plant adaptation as a driver of incipient speciation in the fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda)

Estelle Fiteni, Karine Durand, Sylvie Gimenez, Robert L. Meagher, Fabrice Legeai, Gael J. Kergoat, Nicolas Nègre, Emmanuelle d’Alençon & Kiwoong Nam
Additional file 2: Table S4. The list of genes in the loci with potential selective sweeps.

Additional file 1 of No association between habitat, autogeny and genetics in Moroccan Culex pipiens populations

Soukaina Arich, Yuki Haba, Najlaa Assaid, Megan L. Fritz, Carolyn S. McBride, Mylène Weill, Hassan Taki, M’hammed Sarih & Pierrick Labbé
Additional file 1: Table S1. CQ11 genotype data from previously published studies in Morocco. CQ11 genotype data for C. pipiens s.s. in Morocco retrieved from the literature are indicated with, for each sample, the locality of sampling, the date (year), the type of breeding site (when reported in the publication, “-” when not), the number of individuals of each CQ11 genotypes (homozygotes for the pipiens allele, for the molestus allele, and heterozygotes) and the reference....

No association between habitat, autogeny and genetics in Moroccan Culex pipiens populations

Soukaina Arich, Yuki Haba, Najlaa Assaid, Megan L. Fritz, Carolyn S. McBride, Mylène Weill, Hassan Taki, M’hammed Sarih & Pierrick Labbé
Abstract Background Mosquitoes of the Culex pipiens complex are found across the globe and are the focus of many research studies. Among the temperate species C. pipiens sensu stricto (s.s.), two forms are usually described: molestus and pipiens. These two forms are indistinguishable in terms of morphology but show behavioral and physiological differences that may have consequences for their associated epidemiology. The two forms are well defined in the northern part of the species distribution,...

Climatic similarity and genomic background shape the extent of parallel adaptation in Timema stick insects

Samridhi Chaturvedi, Zachariah Gompert, Jefferey L. Feder, Owen G. Osborne, Moritz Muschick, Rudiger Riesch, Victor Soria-Carrasco & Patrik Nosil
Evolution can repeat itself, resulting in parallel adaptations in independent lineages occupying similar environments. Moreover, parallel evolution sometimes, but not always, uses the same genes. Two main hypotheses have been put forth to explain the probability and extent of parallel evolution. First, parallel evolution is more likely when shared ecologies result in similar patterns of natural selection in different taxa. Second, parallelism is more likely when genomes are similar, because of shared standing variation and...

Additional file 1 of Joint modeling strategy for using electronic medical records data to build machine learning models: an example of intracerebral hemorrhage

Jianxiang Tang, Xiaoyu Wang, Hongli Wan, Chunying Lin, Zilun Shao, Yang Chang, Hexuan Wang, Yi Wu, Tao Zhang & Yu Du
Additional file 1. Additional file showed the performance with 95% CI of all 84 combinations of joint modeling strategy.

Joint modeling strategy for using electronic medical records data to build machine learning models: an example of intracerebral hemorrhage

Jianxiang Tang, Xiaoyu Wang, Hongli Wan, Chunying Lin, Zilun Shao, Yang Chang, Hexuan Wang, Yi Wu, Tao Zhang & Yu Du
Abstract Background Outliers and class imbalance in medical data could affect the accuracy of machine learning models. For physicians who want to apply predictive models, how to use the data at hand to build a model and what model to choose are very thorny problems. Therefore, it is necessary to consider outliers, imbalanced data, model selection, and parameter tuning when modeling. Methods This study used a joint modeling strategy consisting of: outlier detection and removal,...

Additional file 1 of Association between in-ICU red blood cells transfusion and 1-year mortality in ICU survivors

Alice Blet, Joel B. McNeil, Julie Josse, Bernard Cholley, Raphaël Cinotti, Gad Cotter, Agnès Dauvergne, Beth Davison, Kévin Duarte, Jacques Duranteau, Marie-Céline Fournier, Etienne Gayat, Samir Jaber, Sigismond Lasocki, Thomas Merkling, Katell Peoc’h, Imke Mayer, Malha Sadoune, Pierre-François Laterre, Romain Sonneville, Lorraine Ware, Alexandre Mebazaa & Antoine Kimmoun
Additional file 1: Figures and Tables.

Additional file 1 of European Headache Federation (EHF) consensus on the definition of effective treatment of a migraine attack and of triptan failure

Simona Sacco, Christian Lampl, Faisal Mohammad Amin, Mark Braschinsky, Christina Deligianni, Derya Uludüz, Jan Versijpt, Anne Ducros, Raquel Gil-Gouveia, Zaza Katsarava, Paolo Martelletti, Raffaele Ornello, Bianca Raffaelli, Deirdre M. Boucherie, Patricia Pozo-Rosich, Margarita Sanchez-del-Rio, Alexandra Sinclair, Antoinette Maassen van den Brink & Uwe Reuter
Additional file 1: Figure S1. PRISMA flowchart of systematic review. Table S1. Pain relief at different timepoints. Table S2. Pain relief and pain-free at 2 hours. Table S3. Headache recurrence within 24 hours. Table S4. Rescue medication. Table S5. Response in triptan non-responders. Table S6. Comparisons of different triptan formulations. Table S7. Comparisons between early and late treatment with triptans. Table S8. Agreement on questions submitted in Round 1. Table S9. Conflicts of interest of...

European Headache Federation (EHF) consensus on the definition of effective treatment of a migraine attack and of triptan failure

Simona Sacco, Christian Lampl, Faisal Mohammad Amin, Mark Braschinsky, Christina Deligianni, Derya Uludüz, Jan Versijpt, Anne Ducros, Raquel Gil-Gouveia, Zaza Katsarava, Paolo Martelletti, Raffaele Ornello, Bianca Raffaelli, Deirdre M. Boucherie, Patricia Pozo-Rosich, Margarita Sanchez-del-Rio, Alexandra Sinclair, Antoinette Maassen van den Brink & Uwe Reuter
Abstract Background Triptans are migraine-specific acute treatments. A well-accepted definition of triptan failure is needed in clinical practice and for research. The primary aim of the present Consensus was to provide a definition of triptan failure. To develop this definition, we deemed necessary to develop as first a consensus definition of effective treatment of an acute migraine attack and of triptan-responder. Main body The Consensus process included a preliminary literature review, a Delphi round and...

Data from: Nitrogen availability and plant-plant interactions drive leaf silicon concentration in wheat genotypes

Félix De Tombeur, Taïna Lemoine, Cyrille Violle, Hélène Fréville, Sarah Thorne, Sue Hartley, Hans Lambers & Florian Fort
Estimating plasticity of leaf silicon (Si) in response to abiotic and biotic factors underpins our comprehension of plant defences and stress resistance in natural and agroecosystems. However, how nitrogen (N) addition and intraspecific plant-plant interactions affect Si accumulation remains unclear. We grew 19 durum wheat genotypes (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum) in pots, either alone, or in intra- or intergenotypic cultures of two individuals, and with or without N. Aboveground biomass, plant height and leaf [Si]...

Medication adherence in women with IBD of childbearing age likely associated with disease knowledge

Robyn Laube, Christian Selinger & Rupert W. Leong
Background:Medication adherence in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is crucial, particularly during pregnancy. Unplanned pregnancies are common; therefore, efforts to maximise adherence should not be restricted to pregnant women.Objectives:We aimed to assess medication adherence in women with IBD of childbearing age, regardless of their reproduction plans.Design:We performed a multi-centre pilot questionnaire study of women with IBD age 18–45 years.Methods:Survey questions included patient demographics, disease history, and validated assessments of IBD and pregnancy knowledge, medication adherence and...

Greater functional similarity in mobile compared to sessile assemblages colonizing artificial coastal habitats

Jean-Charles Leclerc, Naily Nashira Figueroa, Antonio Brante & Frédérique Viard
Among anthropogenic habitats built in the marine environment, floating and non-floating structures can be colonized by distinct assemblages. However, there is little knowledge whether these differences are also reflected in the functional structure. This study compared the functional diversity of sessile and mobile invertebrate assemblages that settle over 3 months on floating vs. non-floating artificial habitats, in two Chilean ports. Using morphological, trophic, behavioral, and life history traits, we found differences between mobile and sessile...

Data and scripts from: Microbiome composition is shaped by geography and population structure in the parasitic wasp Asobara japonica, but not in the presence of the endosymbiont Wolbachia

Pina Brinker & Michael C. Fontaine
The microbial community composition is crucial for diverse life-history traits in many organisms. However, we still lack a sufficient understanding of how the host microbiome is acquired and maintained, a pressing issue in times of global environmental change. Here we investigated to what extent host genotype, environmental conditions, and the endosymbiont Wolbachia influence the bacterial communities in the parasitic wasp Asobara japonica. We sampled multiple wasp populations across ten locations in their natural distribution range...

Additional file 1 of Accuracy of clinicians’ ability to predict the need for renal replacement therapy: a prospective multicenter study

Alexandre Sitbon, Michael Darmon, Guillaume Geri, Paul Jaubert, Pauline Lamouche-Wilquin, Clément Monet, Lucie Le Fèvre, Marie Baron, Marie-Line Harlay, Côme Bureau, Olivier Joannes-Boyau, Claire Dupuis, Damien Contou, Virginie Lemiale, Marie Simon, Christophe Vinsonneau, Clarisse Blayau, Frederic Jacobs & Lara Zafrani
Additional file 1: Figure S1. Physician prediction: Visual Likert Scale. Figure S2. PresagEER study timeline. Table S1. Delays between ICU admission, AKI diagnosis and RRT initiation. Table S2. RRT characteristics. Table S3. Characteristics and outcomes of AKI patients (n (%) or median (IQR)). Table S4. Multivariate analysis including variables associated with the risk of requiring RRT (without physician prediction).

Dataset: What makes a teddy bear comforting?

Anne-Sophie Tribot, Nathalie Blanc, Thierry Brassac, François Guilhaumon, Nicolas Casajus & Nicolas Mouquet
This dataset relates to a study intended to identify whether particular physical and sensory characteristics contribute to making a bear more comforting. These data were collected as part of a participatory experiment during the European Researchers' Night, on September 27, 2019, in 13 French cities simultaneously (395 participants). The file "data_teddybears" corresponds to the raw data, whose meaning and coding of each variable is detailed in the file "data_teddybears_metadata". The file "data_teddybears_finals" corresponds to sorted...

Registration Year

  • 2022
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Affiliations

  • University of Montpellier
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