19 Works

Data from: Combining niche-shift and population genetic analyses predicts rapid phenotypic evolution during invasion

Erik E. Sotka, Aaron W. Baumgardner, Paige M. Bippus, Claude Destombe, Elizabeth A. Duermit, Hikaru Endo, Ben A. Flanagan, Mits Kamiya, Lauren E. Lees, Courtney J. Murren, Masahiro Nakaoka, Sarah J. Shainker, Allan E. Strand, Ryuta Terada, Myriam Valero, Florian Weinberger, Stacy A. Krueger-Hadfield & Christophe Destombe
Rapid evolution of non-native species can facilitate invasion success, but recent reviews indicate that such microevolution rarely yields expansion of the climatic niche in the introduced habitats. However, because some invasions originate from a geographically restricted portion of the native species range and its climatic niche, it is possible that the frequency, direction and magnitude of phenotypic evolution during invasion has been underestimated. We explored the utility of niche-shift analyses in the red seaweed Gracilaria...

Worldwide evidence of a unimodal relationship between productivity and plant species richness

Lauchlan H. Fraser, Jason Pither, Anke Jentsch, Marcelo Sternberg, Martin Zobel, Diana Askarizadeh, Sandor Bartha, Carl Beierkuhnlein, Jonathan A. Bennett, Alex Bittel, Bazartseren Boldgiv, Ilsi I. Boldrini, Edward Bork, Leslie Brown, Marcelo Cabido, James Cahill, Cameron N. Carlyle, Giandiego Campetella, Stefano Chelli, Ofer Cohen, Anna-Maria Csergo, Sandra Diaz, Lucas Enrico, David Ensing, Alessandra Fidelis … & Szilárd Szentes
The search for predictions of species diversity across environmental gradients has challenged ecologists for decades. The humped-back model (HBM) suggests that plant diversity peaks at intermediate productivity; at low productivity few species can tolerate the environmental stresses, and at high productivity a few highly competitive species dominate. Over time the HBM has become increasingly controversial, and recent studies claim to have refuted it. Here, by using data from coordinated surveys conducted throughout grasslands worldwide and...

Data from: ClonEstiMate, a Bayesian method for quantifying rates of clonality of populations genotyped at two-time steps

Ronan Becheler, Jean-Pierre Masson, Sophie Arnaud-Haond, Fabien Halkett, Stéphanie Mariette, Marie-Laure Guillemin, Myriam Valero, Christophe Destombe & Solenn Stoeckel
Partial clonality is commonly used in Eukaryotes and has large consequences for their evolution and ecology. Assessing accurately the relative importance of clonal versus sexual reproduction matters for studying and managing such species. Here, we proposed a Bayesian approach, ClonEstiMate, to infer rates of clonality c from populations sampled twice over a short time interval, ideally one generation time. The method relies on the likelihood of the transitions between genotype frequencies of ancestral and descendent...

High fire frequency and the impact of the 2019–2020 megafires on Australian plant diversity

Rachael Gallagher, Stuart Allen, Berin MacKenzie, Colin Yates, Gosper Carl, David Keith, Cory Merow, Matthew White, Elizabeth Wenk, Brian Maitner, Kang He, Vanessa Adams, Tony Auld, Rachael V. Gallagher, Berin D. E. Mackenzie, Colin J. Yates, Carl R. Gosper, David A. Keith, Matthew D. White, Brian S. Maitner, Vanessa M. Adams & Tony D. Auld
This dataset details the proportion of the geographic range of 26,062 Australian plant species burnt in the 2019-2020 megafire; threatened listing status on state and Commonwealth threatened species legislation; species endemic status in each state/territory according to the Australian Plant Census; and risk ranking for exposure to high fire frequency (short intervals between fires) and cumulative impacts of fire (populations dominated by immature individuals). Further details are provided in the users should consult and cite...

Data from: Tracing the trans-Pacific evolutionary history of a domesticated seaweed (Gracilaria chilensis) with archaeological and genetic data

Marie-Laure Guillemin, Myriam Valero, Sylvain Faugeron, Wendy Nelson & Christophe Destombe
The history of a domesticated marine macroalga is studied using archaeological, phylogeographic and population genetic tools. Phylogeographic and population genetic analyses demonstrated that the cultivated red alga Gracilaria chilensis colonised the Chilean coast from New Zealand. Combining archaeological observations with phylogeographic data provided evidence that exchanges between New Zealand and Chile have occurred at least before the Holocene, likely at the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and we suggest that migration probably occurred...

Data from: Pre-domestication bottlenecks of the cultivated seaweed Gracilaria chilensis

Oscar R. Huanel, Suany Quesada-Calderón, Cristian Ríos, Saraí Morales-González, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Wendy A. Nelson, Natalia Arakaki, Stéphane Mauger, Sylvain Faugeron & Marie-Laure Guillemin
Gracilaria chilensis is the main cultivated seaweed in Chile. The low genetic diversity observed in the Chilean population has been associated with the over-exploitation of natural beds and/or the founder effect that occurred during the post-glacial colonization from New Zealand. How these processes have affected its evolutionary trajectory before farming and incipient domestication is poorly understood. In this study, we used 2,232 SNPs to assess how the species' evolutionary history in New Zealand (its region...

Temporally varying disruptive selection in the medium ground finch (Geospiza fortis).

Marc-Olivier Beausoleil, Luke Frishkoff, Leithen M'Gonigle, Joost Raeymaekers, Sarah Knutie, Luis De León, Sarah Huber, Jaime Chaves, Dale Clayton, Jennifer Koop, Jeffrey Podos, Diana Sharpe, Andrew Hendry & Rowan Barrett
Disruptive natural selection within populations exploiting different resources is considered to be a major driver of adaptive radiation and the production of biodiversity. Fitness functions, which describe the relationships between trait variation and fitness, can help to illuminate how this disruptive selection leads to population differentiation. However, a single fitness function represents only a particular selection regime over a single specified time period (often a single season or a year), and therefore might not capture...

Data from: O father where art thou? Paternity analyses in a natural population of the haploid-diploid seaweed Chrondrus crispus

Stacy A. Krueger-Hadfield, Denis Roze, Christophe Destombe, Juan A. Correa & Myriam Valero
The link between life history traits and mating systems in diploid organisms has been extensively addressed in the literature, whereas the degree of selfing and/or inbreeding in natural populations of haploid–diploid organisms, in which haploid gametophytes alternate with diploid sporophytes, has been rarely measured. Dioecy has often been used as a proxy for the mating system in these organisms. Yet, dioecy does not prevent the fusion of gametes from male and female gametophytes originating from...

Habitat selection of foraging male Great Snipes on floodplain meadows: importance of proximity to the lek, vegetation cover and bare ground

Michał Korniluk, Paweł Białomyzy, Grzegorz Grygoruk, Łukasz Kozub, Marcin Sielezniew, Piotr Świętochowski, Tomasz Tumiel, Marcin Wereszczuk & Przemysław Chylarecki
Drainage of wetlands and agricultural intensification has resulted in serious biodiversity loss in Europe, not least in grasslands. Consequently, many meadow birds have drastically declined, and the habitats they select for breeding currently rely on land management. However, the selection of habitats maintained by agriculture may contribute to reduced fitness and thus remain maladaptive for individuals, which makes conservation challenging. An understanding of the relationships between species’ habitat selection, food supply and land management in...

Data from: Attack and aggregation of a major squash pest: parsing the role of plant chemistry and beetle pheromones across spatial scales

Lauren Brzozowski, Jeffrey Gardner, Michael Hoffmann, André Kessler, Anurag Agrawal & Michael Mazourek
1. Successful management of insect crop pests requires an understanding of the cues and spatial scales at which they function to affect rates of attack of preferred and non-preferred host plants. A long-standing conceptual framework in insect-plant ecology posits that there is hierarchical structure spanning host location, acceptance, and attack that could be exploited for integrated pest management. 2. We investigated how plant- and insect-derived chemical cues affect successive decisions of host choice in aggregating...

Remotely sensed forest understory density and nest predator occurrence interact to predict suitable breeding habitat and the occurrence of a resident boreal bird species

Julian Klein, Paul Haverkamp, Eva Lindberg, Michael Griesser & Sönke Eggers
Habitat suitability models (HSM) based on remotely sensed data are useful tools in conservation work. However, they typically use species occurrence data rather than robust demographic variables, and their predictive power is rarely evaluated. These shortcomings can result in misleading guidance for conservation. Here, we develop and evaluate a HSM based on correlates of long term breeding success of an open nest building boreal forest bird, the Siberian jay. In our study site in northern...

Optimal Defense Theory in an ant‐plant mutualism: extrafloral nectar as an induced defense is maximized in the most valuable plant structures

Eduardo Calixto, Denise Lange, Judith Bronstein, Helena Torezan-Silingardi & Kleber Del-Claro
Optimal Defense Theory (ODT) predicts that to maximize the benefits of defense against herbivores while minimizing its costs, plants will invest in defenses to structures according to their value and to the likelihood that they will be attacked. Constitutive defenses are expected in structures of high value, whereas induced defenses are expected in structures of low value. Regarding the biotic defense mediated by extrafloral nectaries (EFNs) and based on ODT, we predicted that under control...

The Geometry and Genetics of Hybridization

Hilde Schneemann, Bianca De Sanctis, Denis Roze, Nicolas Bierne & John Welch
When divergent populations form hybrids, hybrid fitness can vary with genome composition, current environmental conditions, and the divergence history of the populations. We develop analytical predictions for hybrid fitness, which incorporate all three factors. The predictions are based on Fisher's geometric model, and apply to a wide range of population genetic parameter regimes and divergence conditions, including allopatry and parapatry, local adaptation and drift. Results show that hybrid fitness can be decomposed into intrinsic effects...

Data from: Hybridization between two cryptic filamentous brown seaweeds along the shore: analysing pre- and post-zygotic barriers in populations of individuals with varying ploidy levels

Alejandro E. Montecinos, Marie L. Guillemin, Lucia Couceiro, Akira F. Peters, Solenn Stoeckel, Myriam Valero & Marie-Laure Guillemin
We aimed to study the importance of hybridization between two cryptic species of the genus Ectocarpus, a group of filamentous algae with haploid-diploid life cycles that include the principal genetic model organism for the brown algae. In haploid-diploid species, the genetic structure of the two phases of the life cycle can be analysed separately in natural populations. Such life cycles provide a unique opportunity to estimate the frequency of hybrid genotypes in diploid sporophytes and...

Data from: Evidence for parasite-mediated selection during short-lasting toxic algal blooms

François Blanquart, Myriam Valero, Catharina Alves-De-Souza, Aliou Dia, Frédéric Lepelletier, Estelle Bigeard, Christian Jeanthon, Christophe Destombe & Laure Guillou
Parasites play a role in the control of transient algal blooms, but it is not known whether parasite-mediated selection results in coevolution of the host and the parasites over this short time span. We investigated the presence of coevolution between the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum and two naturally occurring endoparasites during blooms lasting a month in two river estuaries, using cross-inoculation experiments across time and space. Higher parasite abundance was associated with a large daily...

Data from: Local coastal configuration rather than latitudinal gradient shape clonal diversity and genetic structure of Phymatolithon calcareum maerl beds in North European Atlantic

Cristina Pardo, Marie-Laure Guillemin, Viviana Peña, Ignacio Bárbara, Myriam Valero & Rodolfo Barreiro
Maerl beds are one of the world’s key coastal ecosystems and are threatened by human activities and global change. In this study, the genetic diversity and structure of one of the major European maerl-forming species, Phymatolithon calcareum, was studied using eight microsatellite markers. Two sampling scales (global: North East Atlantic and regional: Galicia) were investigated and fifteen maerl beds from Atlantic Europe were sampled. At the regional-scale the location of sites outside and within four...

Microgeographic divergence of functional responses among salamanders under antagonistic selection from apex predators

Mark C. Urban, Nicole Friedenfelds & Jonathan Richardson
A predator's functional response determines predator–prey interactions by describing the relationship between the number of prey available and the number eaten. Its shape and parameters fundamentally govern the dynamic equilibrium of predator–prey interactions and their joint abundances. Yet, estimates of these key parameters generally assume stasis in space and time and ignore the potential for local adaptation to alter feeding responses and the stability of trophic dynamics. Here, we evaluate if functional responses diverge among...

Data from: Phenological synchrony shapes pathology in host–parasite systems

Travis McDevitt-Galles, Wynne E. Moss, Dana M. Calhoun & Pieter T. J. Johnson
A key challenge surrounding ongoing climate shifts is to identify how they alter species interactions, including those between hosts and parasites. Because transmission often occurs during critical time windows, shifts in the phenology of either taxa can alter the likelihood of interaction or the resulting pathology. We quantified how phenological synchrony between vulnerable stages of an amphibian host (Pseudacris regilla) and infection by a pathogenic trematode (Ribeiroia ondatrae), determined infection prevalence, parasite load, and host...

Recent warming reduces the reproductive advantage of large size and contributes to evolutionary downsizing in nature

David C Fryxell, Alexander N. Hoover, Daniel A. Alvarez, Finn J. Arnesen, Javiera N. Benavente, Emma R. Moffett, Michael T. Kinnison, Kevin S. Simon & Eric P. Palkovacs
Body size is a key functional trait that is predicted to decline under warming. Warming is known to cause size declines via phenotypic plasticity, but evolutionary responses of body size to warming are poorly understood. To test for warming-induced evolutionary responses of body size and growth rates, we used populations of mosquitofish ( Gambusia affinis ) recently established (less than 100 years) from a common source across a strong thermal gradient (19–33°C) created by geothermal...

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