13 Works

Data from: Year-round sexual harassment as a behavioral mediator of vertebrate population dynamics

Victoria Wearmouth, Emily Southall, David Morritt, Richard C. Thompson, Innes C. Cuthill, Julian Partridge, David W. Sims & Julian C. Partridge
Within-species sexual segregation is a widespread phenomenon among vertebrates but its causes remain a topic of much debate. Female avoidance of male coercive mating attempts has the potential to influence the social structure of animal populations, yet it has been largely overlooked as a driver of sexual separation. Indeed, its potential role in long-term structuring of natural populations has not been studied. Here we use a comparative approach to examine the suitability of multiple hypotheses...

Data from: Synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy of fossil embryos

Philip C. J. Donoghue, Stefan Bengtson, Xi-Ping Dong, Neil J. Gostling, Therese Huldtgren, John A. Cunningham, Chongyu Yin, Zhao Yue, Fan Peng & Marco Stampanoni
Fossilized embryos from the late Neoproterozoic and earliest Phanerozoic have caused much excitement because they preserve the earliest stages of embryology of animals that represent the initial diversification of metazoans. However, the potential of this material has not been fully realized because of reliance on traditional, non-destructive methods that allow analysis of exposed surfaces only, and destructive methods that preserve only a single two-dimensional view of the interior of the specimen. Here, we have applied...

Data from: microRNAs reveal the interrelationships of hagfish, lampreys, and gnathostomes and the nature of the ancestral vertebrate

Alysha M. Heimberg, Richard Cowper-Sal·Lari, Marie Sémon, Philip C. J. Donoghue, Kevin J. Peterson & R. Cowper-Sal{Middle Dot}Lari
Hagfish and lampreys are the only living representatives of the jawless vertebrates (agnathans), and compared with jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes), they provide insight into the embryology, genomics, and body plan of the ancestral vertebrate. However, this insight has been obscured by controversy over their interrelationships. Morphological cladistic analyses have identified lampreys and gnathostomes as closest relatives, whereas molecular phylogenetic studies recover a monophyletic Cyclostomata (hagfish and lampreys as closest relatives). Here, we show through deep sequencing...

Data from: The anatomy, taphonomy, taxonomy and systematic affinity of Markuelia: Early Cambrian to Early Ordovician scalidophorans

Xi-Ping Dong, Stefan Bengston, Neil J. Gostling, John A. Cunningham, Thomas H. P. Harvey, Artem Kouchinsky, Anatoly K. Val'kov, John E. Repetski, Marco Stampanoni, Federica Marone & Philip C. J. Donoghue
Markuelia is a vermiform, annulated introvertan animal known as embryonic fossils from the Lower Cambrian to Lower Ordovician. Analysis of an expanded and revised dataset for Introverta shows that the precise position of Markuelia within this clade is dependent on the taxa included. As a result, Markuelia is assigned to the scalidophoran total group to reflect uncertainty as to whether it is a stem-scalidophoran or a stem-priapulid. The taxonomy of the genus is revised to...

Data from: Polar lakes may act as ecological islands to aquatic protists

Karin Rengefors, Ramiro Logares & Johanna Laybourn-Parry
A fundamental question in ecology is whether microorganisms follow the same patterns as multicellular organisms when it comes to population structure and levels of genetic diversity. Enormous population sizes, predominately asexual reproduction, and presumably high dispersal due to small body size could have profound implications on their genetic diversity and population structure. Here, we have analyzed the population genetic structure in a lake-dwelling microbial eukaryote (dinoflagellate) and tested the hypothesis that there is population genetic...

Data from: Fossil embryos from the Middle and Late Cambrian period of Hunan, south China

Xi-Ping Dong, Philip C. J. Donoghue, Hong Cheng & Jian-Bo Liu
Comparative embryology is integral to uncovering the pattern and process of metazoan phylogeny, but it relies on the assumption that life histories of living taxa are representative of their antecedents. Fossil embryos provide a crucial test of this assumption and, potentially, insight into the evolution of development, but because discoveries so far lack phylogenetic constraint, their significance is moot. Here we describe a collection of embryos from the Middle and Late Cambrian period (500 million...

Data from: Historical introgression and the persistence of ghost alleles in the intermediate horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus affinis)

Xiuguang Mao, Guimei He, Panyu Hua, Gareth Jones, Shuyi Zhang & Stephen J. Rossiter
Phylogenetic conflicts between genetic markers can help to disentangle complex histories of phylogeography and introgression among taxa. We previously proposed that the Chinese mainland subspecies of the intermediate horseshoe bat Rhinolophus affinis himalayanus colonized Hainan Island to form the subspecies R. a. hainanus. Subsequent recolonization of the mainland formed a third taxon, R. a macrurus, and a secondary contact zone with the ancestral himalayanus. To test for historical and recurrent genetic exchange between these mainland...

Data from: Landscape genetics of a top neotropical predator

Sílvia Pérez-Espona, James E. McLeod & Nigel R. Franks
Habitat loss and fragmentation as a consequence of human activities is a worldwide phenomenon and one of the major threats to global biodiversity. Habitat loss and fragmentation is particularly a concern in the biodiverse tropics, where deforestation is occurring at unprecedented rates. Although insects are one of the most diverse and functionally important groups in tropical ecosystems, the quantitative effect of landscape features on their gene flow remains unknown. Here, we used a robust landscape...

Data from: The anatomy, affinity, and phylogenetic significance of Markuelia

Xi-Ping Dong, Philip C. J. Donoghue, John A. Cunningham, Jian-Bo Liu & Hong Cheng
The fossil record provides a paucity of data on the development of extinct organisms, particularly for their embryology. The recovery of fossilized embryos heralds new insight into the evolution of development but advances are limited by an almost complete absence of phylogenetic constraint. Markuelia is an exception to this, known from cleavage and pre-hatchling stages as a vermiform and profusely annulated direct-developing bilaterian with terminal circumoral and posterior radial arrays of spines. Phylogenetic analyses have...

Data from: Are palaeoscolecids ancestral ecdysozoans?

Thomas H. P. Harvey, Xiping Dong & Philip C. J. Donoghue
The reconstruction of ancestors is a central aim of comparative anatomy and evolutionary developmental biology, not least in attempts to understand the relationship between developmental and organismal evolution. Inferences based on living taxa can and should be tested against the fossil record, which provides an independent and direct view onto historical character combinations. Here, we consider the nature of the last common ancestor of living ecdysozoans through a detailed analysis of palaeoscolecids, an early and...

Data from: Arthropod diversity in a tropical forest

Yves Basset, Lukas Cizek, Philippe Cuénoud, Raphael K. Didham, François Guilhaumon, Olivier Missa, Vojtech Novotny, Frode Ødegaard, Tomas Roslin, Jürgen Schmidl, Alexey K. Tishechkin, Neville N. Winchester, David W. Roubik, Henri-Pierre Aberlenc, Johannes Bail, Héctor Barrios, Jon R. Bridle, Gabriela Castaño-Meneses, Bruno Corbara, Gianfranco Curletti, Wesley Duarte Da Rocha, Domir De Bakker, Jacques H. C. Delabie, Alain Dejean, Laura L. Fagan … & Maurice Leponce
Most eukaryotic organisms are arthropods. Yet, their diversity in rich terrestrial ecosystems is still unknown. Here we produce tangible estimates of the total species richness of arthropods in a tropical rainforest. Using a comprehensive range of structured protocols, we sampled the phylogenetic breadth of arthropod taxa from the soil to the forest canopy in the San Lorenzo forest, Panama. We collected 6,144 arthropod species from 0.48 ha and extrapolated total species richness to larger areas...

Data from: The first half of tetrapod evolution, sampling proxies, and fossil record quality

Michael J. Benton, Marcello Ruta, Alexander M. Dunhill & Manabu Sakamoto
The first half of tetrapod evolution witnessed substantial diversification of the clade and several major turnovers and mass extinctions. In the time since their origin, more than 380 Myr ago, to the beginning of the Middle Jurassic 175 Myr ago, tetrapods apparently diversified fitfully, reaching their highest level in the Middle Permian, and showing major diversity declines in the late Moscovian, Early Permian, Wordian, lower Wuchiapingian, end-Permian, lower Anisian, lower Ladinian, Late Triassic (lower Norian...

Data from: Approximate Bayesian computation for modular inference problems with many parameters: the example of migration rates

Simon Aeschbacher, Andreas Futschik & Mark A. Beaumont
We propose a two-step procedure for estimating multiple migration rates in an approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) framework, accounting for global nuisance parameters. The approach is not limited to migration, but generally of interest for inference problems with multiple parameters and a modular structure (e.g. independent sets of demes or loci). We condition on a known, but complex demographic model of a spatially subdivided population, motivated by the reintroduction of Alpine ibex (Capra ibex) into Switzerland....

Registration Year

  • 2012
    13

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    13

Affiliations

  • University of Bristol
    13
  • Peking University
    5
  • Paul Scherrer Institute
    2
  • Swedish Museum of Natural History
    2
  • Universidad De Panama
    1
  • Plymouth University
    1
  • National Museum of Natural History
    1
  • University of Erlangen-Nuremberg
    1
  • Research Institute for Nature and Forest
    1
  • Lund University
    1