56 Works

Time series of trajectory data for individual three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) swimming individually and in groups of six individuals

H.E.A. MacGregor & C.C. Ioannou
The resource consists of cartesian coordinates, expressed in units of pixels, for fish swimming individually, in groups of six individuals, and in groups of six individuals while presented repeatedly with a food stimulus delivering two food items until satiation. The fish were filmed from above with a high resolution video camera. The data were generated from the images and video using automated two-dimensional tracking software. The data were collected between September 2019 and March 2020...

Time series of trajectory data for individual three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) swimming in groups of eight individuals

H.E.A. MacGregor & C.C. Ioannou
The resource consists of cartesian coordinates, expressed in units of pixels for groups of eight individual fish, swimming in a shoal. The fish were filmed from above with a high resolution video camera. The data were generated from the images and video using automated two-dimensional tracking software. A food stimulus delivering a single food reward was presented six times per trial. The data were collected between July and August 2017 in a controlled fish laboratory...

Processed InSAR images over the volcanoes of the East African Rift

Fabien Albino & Juliet Biggs
This data set contains a set of 20,740 unwrapped, geocoded interferograms derived from Sentinel-1 InSAR scenes processed over 63 volcanoes within the East African Rift system. A full description of the dataset is provided in the accompanying READMe file. This data set was first published in Albino, F. & Biggs, J. (2020). Magmatic processes in the east African rift system: Insights from a 2015-2020 Sentinel-1 InSAR survey, Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems.

Data and R code from: Nature calls: intelligence and natural foraging style predict welfare problems in captive parrots

Emma Mellor
Around half of all parrots (a highly threatened order) live in captivity. Here, some species thrive. Others, however, breed poorly or display stereotypic behaviours indicating stress. Using data on the prevalence of three types of stereotypic behaviour in pet (50 species; 1,378 individuals) and aviculture hatch rates (115 species; 10,255 breeding pairs), we applied Phylogenetic Comparative Methods (PCMs) to test hypothesised causes of this variation (relating to species’ rarity and constraints on natural behaviour). In...

Data from: Colour pattern variation forms local background matching camouflage in a leaf-mimicking toad

James Barnett, Constantine Michalis, Nicholas Scott-Samuel & Innes Cuthill
Optimal camouflage can, in principle, be relatively easily achieved in simple, homogeneous, environments where backgrounds always have the same color, brightness, and patterning. Natural environments are, however, rarely homogenous and species often find themselves viewed against varied backgrounds where the task of concealment is more challenging. One result of variable backgrounds is the evolution of intraspecific phenotypic variation which may either be generalized, with multiple similarly cryptic patterns, or specialized, with each discrete color form...

Cheirogaleus population density meta-analysis data

Daniel Hending
Aim: Global animal populations are in decline due to destruction and degradation of their natural habitat. Understanding the factors that determine the distribution and density of threatened animal populations is therefore now a crucial component of their study and conservation. The Cheirogaleidae are a diverse family of small-bodied, nocturnal lemurs that are widespread throughout the forests of Madagascar. However, many cheirogaleid lemurs are now highly threatened with extinction and the environmental factors that determine their...

Evidence that bottlenose dolphins can communicate with vocal signals to solve a cooperative task

Stephanie King, Emily Guarino, Christina McMullen, Katy Donegan & Kelly Jaakkola
Cooperation experiments have long been used to explore the cognition underlying animals' coordination towards a shared goal. While the ability to understand the need for a partner in a cooperative task has been demonstrated in a number of species, there has been far less focus on cooperation experiments that address the role of communication. In humans, cooperative efforts can be enhanced by physical synchrony, and coordination problems can be solved using spoken language. Indeed, human...

Ecological opportunity and the rise and fall of crocodylomorph evolutionary innovation

Thomas Stubbs, Stephanie Pierce, Armin Elsler, Philip Anderson, Emily Rayfield & Michael Benton
Understanding the origin, expansion and loss of biodiversity is fundamental to evolutionary biology. The approximately 26 living species of crocodylomorphs (crocodiles, caimans, alligators and gharials) represent just a snapshot of the group’s rich 230-million-year history, whereas the fossil record reveals a hidden past of great diversity and innovation, including ocean and land-dwelling forms, herbivores, omnivores and apex predators. In this macroevolutionary study of skull and jaw shape disparity, we show that crocodylomorph ecomorphological variation peaked...

Cooperation-based concept formation in male bottlenose dolphins

Stephanie King, Richard Connor, Michael Krützen & Simon Allen
In Shark Bay, Western Australia, male bottlenose dolphins form a complex nested alliance hierarchy. At the first level, pairs or trios of unrelated males cooperate to herd single females. Multiple first-order alliances cooperate in teams (second-order alliances) in the pursuit and defense of females, and multiple teams also work together (third-order alliances). Yet it remains unknown how dolphins classify these nested alliance relationships. We used 30 years of behavioural data combined with 40 contemporary sound...

Supplementary material for: Testing for a dietary shift in the Early Cretaceous ceratopsian dinosaur Psittacosaurus lujiatunensis

Damiano Landi, Logan King, Qi Zhao, Emily Rayfield & Michael Benton
Many dinosaurs may have shown ecological differentiation between hatchlings and adults, possibly because of the great size differential. The basal ceratopsian Psittacosaurus lujiatunensis is known from thousands of specimens from the Early Cretaceous of China and these include many so-called ‘juvenile clusters’. During the early stages of ontogeny, P. lujiatunensis underwent a posture shift from quadrupedal to bipedal, and a dietary shift has also been postulated. In this study, we apply a 2D mechanical analysis...

Simulated distribution of the fluid salinity, Cu and temperature in a sub-volcanic region

Jon Blundy, Andrey Afanasyev, Oleg Melnik, Brian Tattitch, Steve Sparks, Alison Rust & Ivan Utkin
The files brinelens.00.vtu, brinelens.01.vtu,... contain the simulated distributions of the fluid bulk salinity (a), the Cu concentration in fluid for the 'no sulfur' case (b), the Cu concenration in fluid for the 'sulfur unlimited' case (c), the Cu deposition for the 'sulfur unlimited' case (d), and the temperature (e) at t=0 yr, 10000 yr, 20000 yr,..., respectively. The distributions shown in Fig. 6a-e are in brinelens.10.vtu. The file brinelens.csv contains the simulated time evolution of...

Nectar values from: Quantifying nectar production by flowering plants in urban and rural landscapes

Nicholas Tew, Jane Memmott, Ian Vaughan, Stephanie Bird, Graham Stone, Simon Potts & Katherine Baldock
Floral resources (nectar and pollen) provide food for insect pollinators but have declined in the countryside due to land use change. Given widespread pollinator loss, it is important that we quantify their food supply to help develop conservation actions. While nectar resources have been measured in rural landscapes, equivalent data are lacking for urban areas, an important knowledge gap as towns and cities often host diverse pollinator populations. We quantified the nectar supply of urban...

Does a high minimum wage make it harder for minimum wage workers to progress?

Silvia Avram & Susan Harkness

De Novo Designed Peptide and Protein Hairpins Self-assemble into Sheets and Nanoparticles

Johanna Galloway, Harriet E. V. Bray, Deborah K. Shoemark,, Lorna R. Hodgson, Jennifer Coombs, Judith M. Mantell, Ruth S. Rose, James F. Ross,, Caroline Morris, Robert L. Harniman, Christopher W. Wood, Christopher Arthur, Paul Verkade & Derek N. Woolfson
AFM, TEM, fluorescence microscopy image files and spectral data published in DOI:10.1002/smll.202100472. Preprint of this is available at bioRxiv DOI:10.1101/2020.08.14.251462

Imperfect detection alters the outcome of management strategies for protected areas

Edd Hammill & Christopher Clement
Designing protected areas configurations to maximize biodiversity is a critical conservation goal. The configuration of protected areas can significantly impact the richness and identity of the species found there; one large patch supports larger populations but can facilitate competitive exclusion. Conversely, many small habitats spreads risk but may exclude predators that typically require large home ranges. Identifying how best to design protected areas is further complicated by monitoring programs failing to detect species. Here we...

Fish avoid visually noisy environments where prey targeting is reduced

Joanna Attwell, Christos Ioannou, Chris Reid & James Herbert-Read
The environment contains different forms of ecological no­­­ise that can reduce the ability of animals to detect information. Here we ask whether animals adapt their behaviour to either exploit or avoid areas of their environment with increased dynamic visual noise. Three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) were immersed into environments with a simulated form of naturally occurring visual noise – moving light bands that form on underwater substrates caused by the refraction of light through surface waves....

Data from: Olfactory testing in Parkinson’s disease & REM behavior disorder: a machine learning approach

Christine Lo, Siddharth Arora, Yoav Ben-Shlomo, Thomas Barber, Michael Lawton, Johannes Klein, Sofia Kanavou, Annette Janzen, Elisabeth Sittig, Wolfgang Oertel, Donald Grosset & Michele Hu
Objective: We sought to identify an abbreviated test of impaired olfaction, amenable for use in busy clinical environments in prodromal (isolated REM sleep Behavior Disorder (iRBD)) and manifest Parkinson’s. Methods: 890 PD and 313 control participants in the Discovery cohort study underwent Sniffin’ stick odour identification assessment. Random forests were initially trained to distinguish individuals with poor (functional anosmia/hyposmia) and good (normosmia/super-smeller) smell ability using all 16 Sniffin’ sticks. Models were retrained using the top...

Ecological and behavioural drivers of offspring size in marine teleost fishes

Karina Vanadzina, André Phillips, Bonnie Martins, Kevin Laland, Michael Webster & Catherine Sheard
Aim: Our aim was to evaluate the role of ecological and life-history factors in shaping global variation in offspring size in a marine clade with a diverse range of parental care behaviours. Location: Global. Time period: Data sourced from literature published from 1953 until 2019. Major taxa studied: Marine teleost fishes. Methods: We compiled a species-level dataset of egg and hatchling size for 1,639 species of marine fish across 45 orders. We used Bayesian phylogenetic...

Linking micro and macroevolution of head shape in an island radiation

Maxime Taverne, Hugo Dutel, Michael Fagan, Anamaria Štambuk, Duje Lisičić, Zoran Tadić, Anne-Claire Fabre & Anthony Herrel
Phenotypic traits have been shown to evolve in response to variation in the environment. However, the evolutionary processes underlying the emergence of phenotypic diversity can typically only be understood at the population level. Consequently, how subtle phenotypic differences at the intraspecific level can give rise to larger-scale changes in performance and ecology remains poorly understood. We here tested for the covariation between ecology, bite force, jaw muscle architecture, and the three-dimensional shape of the cranium...

Data and code for: Collective motion diminishes, but variation between groups emerges, through time in fish shoals

Hannah MacGregor & Christos Ioannou
Despite extensive interest in the dynamic interactions between individuals that drive collective motion in animal groups, the dynamics of collective motion over longer time frames are understudied. Using three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus, randomly assigned to twelve shoals of eight fish, we tested how six key traits of collective motion changed over shorter (within trials) and longer (between days) timescales under controlled laboratory conditions. Over both timescales, groups became less social with reduced cohesion, polarisation, group...

Movement, translocation and MRR data for Heliconius butterflies

Priscila A. Moura, Gilberto Corso, Stephen H. Montgomery & Márcio Z. Cardoso
Site fidelity plays an important role in increasing foraging efficiency, particularly when food resources are reliable. In insects, site fidelity has largely been studied in Hymenopteran species, which consistently return to their nest site after foraging bouts. In butterflies, evidence of foraging site fidelity are limited but may be present in species with specific foraging specialisations, such as Heliconius, which have a derived foraging behaviour centred around active pollen feeding. Unlike many Hymenoptera, Heliconius are...

Scaling the extinction vortex: Body size as a predictor of population dynamics close to extinction events

Nathan Williams, Louise McRae, Robin Freeman, Pol Capdevila & Christopher Clements
Mutual reinforcement between abiotic and biotic factors can drive small populations into a catastrophic downward spiral to extinction – a process known as the ‘extinction vortex.’ However, empirical studies investigating extinction dynamics in relation to species’ traits have been lacking. We assembled a database of 35 vertebrate populations monitored to extirpation over a period of at least ten years, represented by 32 different species, including 25 birds, five mammals and two reptiles. We supplemented these...

Data from: Quantifying nectar production by flowering plants in urban and rural landscapes

Nicholas Tew, Jane Memmott, Ian Vaughan, Stephanie Bird, Graham Stone, Simon Potts & Katherine Baldock
Floral resources (nectar and pollen) provide food for insect pollinators but have declined in the countryside due to land use change. Given widespread pollinator loss, it is important that we quantify their food supply to help develop conservation actions. While nectar resources have been measured in rural landscapes, equivalent data are lacking for urban areas, an important knowledge gap as towns and cities often host diverse pollinator populations. We quantified the nectar supply of urban...

Niche partitioning shaped herbivore macroevolution through the early Mesozoic dataset

Suresh Singh, Armin Elsler, Thomas Stubbs, Russell Bond, Emily Rayfield & Michael Benton
The Triassic (252–201 Ma) marks a major punctuation in Earth history, when ecosystems rebuilt themselves following the devastating Permian-Triassic mass extinction. Herbivory evolved independently several times as ecosystems comprising diverse assemblages of therapsids, parareptiles and archosauromorphs rose and fell, leading to a world dominated by dinosaurs. It was assumed that dinosaurs prevailed either through long-term competitive replacement of the incumbent clades or rapidly and opportunistically following one or more extinction events. Here we use functional...

Processed airborne radio-echo sounding data from the IMAFI survey covering the Institute and Moller ice streams and the Patriot Hills, West Antarctica (2010/2011)

Neil Ross, Robert Bingham, Fausto Ferraccioli, Tom Jordan, Anne Le Brocq, David Rippin & Martin Siegert
An airborne radar survey was flown over the Institute and Moller ice streams in the Weddell Sea sector of West Antarctica in the austral summer of 2010/11 as part of the Institute-Moller Antarctic Funding Initiative (IMAFI) project (grant reference number: NE/G013071/1). This project was a NERC Antarctic Funding Initiative (AFI) collaborative project between the British Antarctic Survey and the Universities of Edinburgh, York, Aberdeen and Exeter with the aim to test the hypothesis that the...

Registration Year

  • 2021
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Affiliations

  • University of Bristol
    56
  • University of Edinburgh
    6
  • Cardiff University
    4
  • University of Southampton
    3
  • Royal Horticultural Society
    2
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • University of Hull
    2
  • University of Oxford
    2
  • University of Reading
    2
  • Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology
    1