20 Works

Data from: Experimental parasite community ecology: intraspecific variation in a large tapeworm affects community assembly

Daniel P. Benesh & Martin Kalbe
Non-random species associations occur in naturally-sampled parasite communities. The processes resulting in predictable community structure (e.g. particular host behaviours, cross-immunity, interspecific competition) could be affected by traits that vary within a parasite species, like growth or antigenicity. We experimentally infected three-spined sticklebacks with a large tapeworm (Schistocephalus solidus) that impacts the energy needs, foraging behaviour, and immune reactions of its host. The tapeworms came from two populations, characterized by high or low growth in sticklebacks....

Data from: Eco-evolutionary feedback promotes Red Queen dynamics and selects for sex in predator populations

Julia Haafke, Maria Abou Chakra & Lutz Becks
Although numerous hypotheses exist to explain the overwhelming presence of sexual reproduction across the tree of life, we still cannot explain its prevalence when considering all inherent costs involved. The Red Queen hypothesis states that sex is maintained because it can create novel genotypes with a selective advantage. This occurs when the interactions between species induce frequent environmental change. Here we investigate whether coevolution and eco-evolutionary feedback dynamics in a predator-prey system allows for indirect...

Data from: Genomic evolution of bacterial populations under co-selection by antibiotics and phage

Johannes Cairns, Jens Frickel, Matti Jalasvuori, Teppo Hiltunen & Lutz Becks
Bacteria live in dynamic systems where selection pressures can alter rapidly, forcing adaptation to the prevailing conditions. In particular, bacteriophages and antibiotics of anthropogenic origin are major bacterial stressors in many environments. We previously observed that populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 exposed to the lytic bacteriophage SBW25Φ2 and a non-inhibitive concentration of the antibiotic streptomycin (co-selection) achieved higher levels of phage resistance compared to populations exposed to the phage alone. In addition, the...

Data from: Competing metabolic strategies in a multilevel selection model

André Amado, Lenin Fernández, Weini Huang, Fernando F. Ferreira & Paulo R. A. Campos
The evolutionary mechanisms of energy efficiency have been addressed. One important question is to understand how the optimized usage of energy can be selected in an evolutionary process, especially when the immediate advantage of gathering efficient individuals in an energetic context is not clear. We propose a model of two competing metabolic strategies differing in their resource usage, an efficient strain which converts resource into energy at high efficiency but displays a low rate of...

Data from: Transcriptome profiling of immune tissues reveals habitat-specific gene expression between lake and river sticklebacks

Yun Huang, Frederic Chain, Mahesh Panchal, Christophe Eizaguirre, Martin Kalbe, Tobias Lenz, Irene Samonte, Monika Stoll, Erich Bornberg-Bauer, Thorsten B. Reusch, Manfred Milinski & Philine Feulner
The observation of habitat-specific phenotypes suggests the action of natural selection. The three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) has repeatedly colonized and adapted to diverse freshwater habitats across the northern hemisphere since the last glaciation, while giving rise to recurring phenotypes associated with specific habitats. Parapatric lake and river populations of sticklebacks harbour distinct parasite communities, a factor proposed to contribute to adaptive differentiation between these ecotypes. However, little is known about the transcriptional response to the...

Data from: Rapid genetic and ecological differentiation during the northern range expansion of the venomous yellow sac spider Cheiracanthium punctorium in Europe

Henrik Krehenwinkel, Dennis Rödder, Magdalena Năpăruş-Aljančič & Matjaz Kuntner
Although poleward range expansions are commonly attributed to global change, a complex interaction of ecological and evolutionary factors might contribute to expansion success. Here, we study the expansion of the yellow sac spider Cheiracanthium punctorium, a medically important species in Central Europe. Using microsatellite markers and DNA sequences, morphological and climate niche analyses, we identify factors associated with the spider’s expansion success. Our results indicate that the species’ initial expansion has been triggered by environmental...

Data from: Measuring microbial fitness in a field reciprocal transplant experiment

Primrose J. Boynton, Rike Stelkens, Vienna Kowallik & Duncan Greig
Microbial fitness is easy to measure in the laboratory, but difficult to measure in the field. Laboratory fitness assays make use of controlled conditions and genetically modified organisms, neither of which are available in the field. Among other applications, fitness assays can help researchers detect adaptation to different habitats or locations. We designed a competitive fitness assay to detect adaptation of Saccharomyces paradoxus isolates to the habitat they were isolated from (oak or larch leaf...

Data from: Recombination in the eggs and sperm in a simultaneously hermaphroditic vertebrate

Loukas Theodosiou, W. O. McMillan & Oscar Puebla
When there is no recombination (achiasmy) in one sex, it is in the heterogametic one. This observation is so consistent that it constitutes one of the few patterns in biology that may be regarded as a ‘rule’ and Haldane (Haldane 1922 J. Genet. 12, 101–109. (doi:10.1007/BF02983075)) proposed that it might be driven by selection against recombination in the sex chromosomes. Yet differences in recombination rates between the sexes (heterochiasmy) have also been reported in hermaphroditic...

Data from: Tracing the dynamics of gene transcripts after organismal death

Alexander E. Pozhitkov, Rafik Neme, Tomislav Domazet-Lošo, Brian G. Leroux, Shivani Soni, Diethard Tautz & Peter A. Noble
In life, genetic and epigenetic networks precisely coordinate the expression of genes—but in death, it is not known if gene expression diminishes gradually or abruptly stops or if specific genes and pathways are involved. We studied this by identifying mRNA transcripts that apparently increase in relative abundance after death, assessing their functions, and comparing their abundance profiles through postmortem time in two species, mouse and zebrafish. We found mRNA transcript profiles of 1063 genes became...

Data from: Sublethal streptomycin concentrations and lytic bacteriophage together promote resistance evolution

Johannes Cairns, Lutz Becks, Matti Jalasvuori & Teppo Hiltunen
Sub-minimum inhibiting concentrations (sub-MICs) of antibiotics frequently occur in natural environments owing to wide-spread antibiotic leakage by human action. Even though the concentrations are very low, these sub-MICs have recently been shown to alter bacterial populations by selecting for antibiotic resistance and increasing the rate of adaptive evolution. However, studies are lacking on how these effects reverberate into key ecological interactions, such as bacteria–phage interactions. Previously, co-selection of bacteria by phages and antibiotic concentrations exceeding...

Data from: The consequences of facultative sex in a prey adapting to predation

Hanna Koch & Lutz Becks
A species reproductive mode, along with its associated costs and benefits, can play a significant role in its evolution and survival. Facultative sexuality, being able to reproduce both sexually and asexually, has been deemed evolutionary favourable as the benefits of either mode may be fully realized. In fact, many studies have focused on identifying the benefits of sex and/or the forces selecting for increased rates of sex using facultative sexual species. The costs of either...

Data from: The temporal window of ecological adaptation in postglacial lakes: a comparison of head morphology, trophic position and habitat use in Norwegian threespine stickleback populations

Kjartan Østbye, Chris Harrod, Finn Gregersen, Tom Klepaker, Michael Schulz, Dolph Schluter & Leif Asbjørn Vøllestad
Background: Studying how trophic traits and niche use are related in natural populations is important in order to understand adaptation and specialization. Here, we describe trophic trait diversity in twenty-five Norwegian freshwater threespine stickleback populations and their putative marine ancestor, and relate trait differences to postglacial lake age. By studying lakes of different ages, depths and distance to the sea we examine key environmental variables that may predict adaptation in trophic position and habitat use....

Data from: A phylogeographical survey of a highly dispersive spider reveals eastern Asia as a major glacial refugium for Palaearctic fauna

Henrik Krehenwinkel, Maxene Graze, Dennis Roedder, Tanaka Kazuhiro, Yuki G. Baba, Christoph Muster, Gabriele Uhl & Kazuhiro Tanaka
Aim: The phylogeographical history of wide-ranging Palaearctic species is not well understood. Here, we present a range-wide phylogeographical study of the wasp spider, Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772), a highly dispersive and widely distributed Palaearctic species. We aim to identify glacial refugia and patterns of interglacial gene flow across the Palaearctic. Location: Palaearctic region, including the Azores, Madeira, Europe, North Africa and Asia. Methods: We conduct a range-wide phylogeographical survey. Our study is based on nuclear...

Data from: The role of prezygotic isolation mechanisms in the divergence of two parasite species

Tina Henrich & Martin Kalbe
Background: The formation of reproductive barriers in diverging lineages is a prerequisite to complete speciation according to the biological species concept. In parasites with complex life cycles, speciation may be driven by adaptation to different intermediate hosts, yet diverging lineages can still share the same definitive host where reproduction takes place. In these cases, prezygotic isolation mechanisms should evolve very early and be particularly strong, preventing costly unfavourable matings. In this study, we investigated the...

Data from: Patterns of MHC-dependent mate selection in humans and non-human primates: a meta-analysis

Jamie Winternitz, Jessica Abbate, Elise Huchard, Jan Havlíček & Laszlo Z. Garamszegi
Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in vertebrates are integral for effective adaptive immune response and are associated with sexual selection. Evidence from a range of vertebrates supports MHC-based preference for diverse and dissimilar mating partners, but evidence from human mate choice studies has been disparate and controversial. Methodologies and sampling peculiarities specific to human studies make it difficult to know whether wide discrepancies in results among human populations are real or artefact. To...

Data from: Community assembly in Lake Tanganyika cichlid fish: quantifying the contributions of both niche-based and neutral processes

Thijs Janzen, Adriana Alzate, Moritz Muschick, Martine E. Maan, Fons Van Der Plas & Rampal S. Etienne
The cichlid family features some of the most spectacular examples of adaptive radiation. Evolutionary studies have highlighted the importance of both trophic adaptation and sexual selection in cichlid speciation. However, it is poorly understood what processes drive the composition and diversity of local cichlid species assemblages on relatively short, ecological timescales. Here, we investigate the relative importance of niche-based and neutral processes in determining the composition and diversity of cichlid communities inhabiting various environmental conditions...

Data from: Fast turnover of genome transcription across evolutionary time exposes entire non-coding DNA to de novo gene emergence

Rafik Neme & Diethard Tautz
Deep sequencing analyses have shown that a large fraction of genomes is transcribed, but the significance of this transcription is much debated. Here, we characterize the phylogenetic turnover of poly-adenylated transcripts in a comprehensive sampling of taxa of the mouse (genus Mus), spanning a phylogenetic distance of 10 Myr. Using deep RNA sequencing we find that at a given sequencing depth transcriptome coverage becomes saturated within a taxon, but keeps extending when compared between taxa,...

Data from: Disruptive selection without genome-wide evolution across a migratory divide

Jan A. C. Von Rönn, Aaron B. A. Shafer, Jochen B. W. Wolf & Aaron B.A. Shafer
Transcontinental migration is a fascinating example of how animals can respond to climatic oscillation. Yet, quantitative data on fitness components are scarce, and the resulting population genetic consequences are poorly understood. Migratory divides, hybrid zones with a transition in migratory behaviour, provide a natural setting to investigate the micro-evolutionary dynamics induced by migration under sympatric conditions. Here, we studied the effects of migratory programme on survival, trait evolution and genome-wide patterns of population differentiation in...

Data from: Seasonal variation in male alternative reproductive tactics

Melanie J. Monroe, Trond Amundsen, Anne Christine Utne Palm, Kenyon B. Mobley & A. C. Utne-Palm
Genetic parentage analyses reveal considerable diversity in alternative reproductive behaviours (e.g. sneaking) in many taxa. However, little is known about whether these behaviours vary seasonally and between populations. Here, we investigate seasonal variation in male reproductive behaviours in a population of two-spotted gobies (Gobiusculus flavescens) in Norway. Male two-spotted gobies guard nests, attract females and care for fertilized eggs. We collected clutches and nest-guarding males early and late in the breeding season in artificial nests...

Data from: Long live the alien: is high genetic diversity a pivotal aspect of crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata) long-lasting and successful invasion?

Emiliano Trucchi, Benoit Facon, Paolo Gratton, Emiliano Mori, Nils Chr. Stenseth & Sissel Jentoft
Studying the evolutionary dynamics of an alien species surviving and continuing to expand after several generations can provide fundamental information on the relevant features of clearly successful invasions. Here, we tackle this task by investigating the dynamics of the genetic diversity in invasive crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata) populations, introduced to Italy about 1500 years ago, which are still growing in size, distribution range and ecological niche. Using genome-wide RAD markers, we describe the structure of...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    20

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    20

Affiliations

  • Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology
    20
  • University of California System
    2
  • University of Oslo
    2
  • GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel
    2
  • University of Bern
    2
  • University of Bergen
    2
  • University of Helsinki
    2
  • University of Jyväskylä
    2
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    1
  • Ghent University
    1