17 Works

Data from: Early arrival and climatically-linked geographic expansion of New World monkeys from tiny African ancestors

Daniele Silvestro, Marcelo F. Tejedor, Martha L. Serrano-Serrano, Oriane Loiseau, Victor Rossier, Jonathan Rolland, Alexander Zizka, Sebastian Höhna, Alexandre Antonelli & Nicolas Salamin
New World monkeys (platyrrhines) are one of the most diverse groups of primates, occupying today a wide range of ecosystems in the American tropics and exhibiting large variations in ecology, morphology, and behavior. Although the relationships among the almost 200 living species are relatively well understood, we lack robust estimates of the timing of origin, ancestral morphology, and geographic range evolution of the clade. Here we integrate paleontological and molecular evidence to assess the evolutionary...

Data from: Longitudinal cognitive and biomarker changes in dominantly inherited Alzheimer disease

Eric McDade, Guoqiao Wang, Brian Andrew Gordon, Jason Hassenstab, Tammie L.S. Benzinger, Virginia Buckles, Anne M. Fagan, David M. Holtzman, Nigel J. Cairns, Alison M. Goate, Daniel S. Marcus, John C. Morris, Katrina Paumier, Chengjie Xiong, Ricardo Allegri, Sarah B. Berman, William Klunk, James Nobel, John Ringman, Bernardino Ghetti, Martin Farlow, Reisa Anne Sperling, Jasmeer Chhatwal, Stephen Salloway, Neil R. Graff-Radford … & Randall J. Bateman
Objective: To assess the onset, sequence and rate of progression of comprehensive biomarker and clinical measures across the spectrum of Alzheimer disease using the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) study and compare these to cross-sectional estimates. Methods: We conducted longitudinal clinical, cognitive, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neuroimaging assessments (mean of 2.7 (+/- 1.1) visits) in 217 DIAN participants. Linear mixed effects models were used to assess changes in each measure relative to individuals’ estimated years...

Data from: The evolution of fungal substrate specificity in a widespread group of crustose lichens

Philipp Resl, Fernando Fernández-Mendoza, Helmut Mayrhofer & Toby Spribille
Lichens exhibit varying degrees of specialization with regard to the surfaces they colonize, ranging from substrate generalists to strict substrate specialists. Though long recognized, the causes and consequences of substrate specialization are poorly known. Using a phylogeny of a 150-200 MYA clade of lichen fungi, we asked whether substrate niche is phylogenetically conserved, which substrates are ancestral, whether specialists arise from generalists or vice versa, and how specialization affects speciation/extinction processes. We found strong phylogenetic...

Data from: Parallel plumage color evolution and introgressive hybridization in wheatears

Manuel Schweizer, Vera Warmuth, Niloofar Alaei Kakhki, Mansour Aliabadian, Marc Förschler, Hadoram Shirihai, Alexander Suh & Reto Burri
Genetic and phenotypic mosaics, in which various phenotypes and different genomic regions show discordant patterns of species or population divergence, offer unique opportunities to study the role of ancestral and introgressed genetic variation in phenotypic evolution. Here, we investigated the evolution of discordant phenotypic and genetic divergence in a monophyletic clade of four songbird taxa – pied wheatear (O. pleschanka), Cyprus wheatear (O. cypriaca), and western and eastern subspecies of black-eared wheatear (O. h. hispanica...

Data from: Functional relations between body mass and risk-taking behavior in wild great tits

Maria Moiron, Yimen G. Araya Ajoy, Kimberley J. Mathot, Alexia Mouchet, Niels J. Dingemanse & Yimen G Araya-Ajoy
Natural selection often favors particular combinations of functionally-related traits, resulting in adaptive phenotypic integration. Phenotypic integration has been proposed as a potential mechanism explaining the existence of repeatable among-individual differences in behavior (i.e., animal personality). In this study, we investigated patterns of covariation between morphology and behavior in a population of free-living great tits (Parus major) monitored for seven years. In particular, we aimed to disentangle the effect of structural size versus body condition on...

Data from: Multiple biological mechanisms result in correlations between pre- and post-mating traits that differ among versus within individuals and genotypes

Cristina Tuni, Chang S. Han & Niels J. Dingemanse
Reproductive traits involved in mate acquisition (pre-mating traits) are predicted to covary with those involved in fertilization success (post-mating traits). Variation in male quality may give rise to positive, and resource allocation trade-offs to negative, covariances between pre- and post-mating traits. Empirical studies have yielded mixed results. Progress is hampered as researchers often fail to appreciate that mentioned biological mechanisms can act simultaneously but at different hierarchical levels of biological variation: genetic correlations may, for...

Data from: The “tolerant chimpanzee” - towards the costs and benefits of sociality in female bonobos

Niina O. Nurmi, Gottfried Hohmann, Lucas G. Goldstone, Tobias Deschner & Oliver Schülke
Humans share an extraordinary degree of sociality with other primates, calling for comparative work into the evolutionary drivers of the variation in social engagement observed between species. Of particular interest is the contrast between the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and bonobo (Pan paniscus), the latter exhibiting increased female gregariousness, more tolerant relationships, and elaborate behavioral adaptations for conflict resolution. Here we test predictions from three socio-ecological hypotheses regarding the evolution of these traits using data on...

Data from: WMH and long-term outcomes in ischemic stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Marios K. Georgakis, Marco Duering, Joanna M. Wardlaw & Martin Dichgans
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between baseline white matter hyperintensities (WMH) in patients with ischemic stroke and long-term risk of dementia, functional impairment, recurrent stroke, and mortality. METHODS: Following the MOOSE and PRISMA guidelines (PROSPERO protocol: CRD42018092857), we systematically searched Medline and Scopus for cohort studies of ischemic stroke patients examining whether MRI- or CT-assessed WMH at baseline are associated with dementia, functional impairment, recurrent stroke, and mortality at 3 months or later post-stroke. We...

Data from: Conservation of a domestic metapopulation structured into related and partly admixed strains

Jelena Ramljak, Gjoko Bunevski, Hysen Bytyqi, Božidarka Marković, Muhamed Brka, Ante Ivanković, Kristaq Kume, Srđan Stojanović, Vasil Nikolov, Mojca Simčič, Johann Soelkner, Elisabeth Kunz, Sophie Rothammer, Doris Seichter, Hans-Peter Grünenfelder, Elli T. Broxham, Waltraud Kugler & Ivica Medugorac
Preservation of genetic diversity is one of the most pressing challenges in the planetary boundaries concept. Within this context, we focused on genetic diversity in a native, unselected and highly admixed domesticated metapopulation. A set of 1828 individuals from 60 different cattle breeds was analysed using a medium density SNP chip. Among these breeds, 14 Buša strains formed a metapopulation represented by 350 individuals, while the remaining 46 breeds represented the global cattle population. Genetic...

Data from: Does perceived predation risk affect patterns of extra-pair paternity? A field experiment in a passerine bird

Robin N. Abbey-Lee, Yimen Gerardo Araya-Ajoy, Alexia Mouchet, Maria Moiron, Erica F. Stuber, Bart Kempenaers & Niels J. Dingemanse
1. Non-consumptive predator effects have been shown to influence a wide range of behavioural, life history, and morphological traits. Extra-pair reproduction is widespread among socially monogamous birds and may incur predation costs. Consequently, altered rates of extra-pair reproduction are expected in circumstances characterized by increased adult perceived predation risk. 2. Additionally, extra-pair reproduction is expected to be most affected for birds with phenotypes that generally increase predation risk (such as more active individuals). 3. In...

Data from: To eat and not be eaten: diurnal mass gain and foraging strategies in wintering great tits

Maria Moiron, Kimberley J. Mathot & Niels J. Dingemanse
Adaptive theory predicts that the fundamental trade-off between starvation and predation risk shapes diurnal patterns in foraging activity and mass gain in wintering passerine birds. Foragers mitigating both types of risk should exhibit a bimodal distribution (increased foraging and mass gain early and late in the day), whereas both foraging and mass gains early (vs. late) during the day are expected when the risk of starvation (vs. predation) is greatest. Finally, relatively constant rates of...

Data from: A prospective study of serum metabolites and risk of ischemic stroke

Daokun Sun, Steffen Tiedt, Bing Yu, Xueqiu Jian, Rebecca F. Gottesman, Tom H. Mosley, Eric Boerwinkle, Martin Dichgans & Myriam Fornage
Objective: To identify promising blood-based biomarkers and novel etiological pathways of disease risk, we applied an untargeted serum metabolomics profiling in a community-based prospective study of ischemic stroke (IS). Methods: In 3,904 men and women from the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities (ARIC) study, Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the association of incident IS with the standardized level of 245 fasting serum metabolites individually, adjusting for age, sex, race, field center, batch, diabetes,...

Data from: Early MoCA predicts long-term cognitive and functional outcome and mortality after stroke

Vera Zietemann, Marios K Georgakis, Thibaut Dondaine, Claudia Müller, Anne-Marie Mendyk, Anna Kopczak, Hilde Hénon, Stéphanie Bombois, Frank Arne Wollenweber, Régis Bordet & Martin Dichgans
Objective: To examine whether the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) administered within 7 days after stroke predicts long-term cognitive impairment, functional impairment, and mortality. Methods: MoCA was administered to 274 patients from two prospective hospital-based cohort studies in Germany (n=125) and France (n=149). Cognitive and functional outcomes were assessed at 6, 12 and 36 months post-stroke by comprehensive neuropsychological testing, the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale, modified Rankin Scale (mRS), and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living...

Data from: Increased developmental density decreases the magnitude of indirect genetic effects expressed during agonistic interactions in an insect

Chang S. Han, Cristina Tuni, Jakob Ulcik & Niels J. Dingemanse
The expression of aggression depends not only on the direct genetic effects (DGEs) of an individual’s genes on its own behaviour, but also on indirect genetic effects (IGEs) caused by heritable phenotypes expressed by social partners. IGEs can affect the amount of heritable variance on which selection can act. Despite the important roles of IGEs in the evolutionary process, it remains largely unknown whether the strength of IGEs varies across life stages or competitive regimes....

Data from: Testing the role of the Red Queen and Court Jester as drivers of the macroevolution of Apollo butterflies

Fabien L. Condamine, Jonathan Rolland, Sebastian Höhna, Felix A. H. Sperling & Isabel Sanmartín
In macroevolution, the Red Queen (RQ) model posits that biodiversity dynamics depend mainly on species-intrinsic biotic factors such as interactions among species or life-history traits, while the Court Jester (CJ) model states that extrinsic environmental abiotic factors have a stronger role. Until recently, a lack of relevant methodological approaches has prevented the unraveling of contributions from these two types of factors to the evolutionary history of a lineage. Here we take advantage of the rapid...

Data from: A 2.6‐g sound and movement tag for studying the acoustic scene and kinematics of echolocating bats

Laura Stidsholt, Mark Johnson, Kristian Beedholm, Lasse Jakobsen, Kathrin Kugler, Signe Brinkløv, Angeles Salles, Cynthia F. Moss & Peter Teglberg Madsen
1. To study sensorimotor behaviour in wild animals, it is necessary to synchronously record the sensory inputs available to the animal, and its movements. To do this, we have developed a biologging device that can record the primary sensory information and the associated movements during foraging and navigating in echolocating bats. 2. This 2.6 -gram tag records the sonar calls and echoes from an ultrasonic microphone, while simultaneously sampling fine-scale movement in three dimensions from...

Data from: Ancient genomes revisit the ancestry of domestic and Przewalski’s horses

Charleen Gaunitz, Antoine Fages, Kristian Hanghøj, Anders Albrechtsen, Naveed Khan, Mikkel Schubert, Andaine Seguin-Orlando, Ivy J. Owens, Sabine Felkel, Olivier Bignon-Lau, Peter De Barros Damgaard, Alissa Mittnik, Azadeh F. Mohaseb, Hossein Davoudi, Saleh Alquraishi, Ahmed H. Alfarhan, Khaled A. S. Al-Rasheid, Eric Crubézy, Norbert Benecke, Sandra Olsen, Dorcas Brown, David Anthony, Ken Massy, Vladimir Pitulko, Aleksei Kasparov … & Ludovic Orlando
The Eneolithic Botai culture of the Central Asian steppes provides the earliest archaeological evidence for horse husbandry, ~5500 years ago, but the exact nature of early horse domestication remains controversial. We generated 42 ancient-horse genomes, including 20 from Botai. Compared to 46 published ancient- and modern-horse genomes, our data indicate that Przewalski’s horses are the feral descendants of horses herded at Botai and not truly wild horses. All domestic horses dated from ~4000 years ago...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    17

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    17

Affiliations

  • Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich
    17
  • University of Alberta
    4
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    3
  • Johns Hopkins University
    2
  • University of Lausanne
    2
  • UNSW Sydney
    2
  • Norwegian University of Science and Technology
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics
    1
  • Massachusetts General Hospital
    1