49 Works

Data from: Large ecosystem service benefits of assisted natural regeneration

Yusheng Yang, Lixin Wang, Zhijie Yang, Chao Xu, Jingsheng Xie, Guangshui Chen, Chengfang Lin, Jianfen Guo, Xiaofei Liu, Decheng Xiong, Weisheng Lin, Shidong Chen, Zongming He, Kaimiao Lin, Miaohua Jiang & Teng-Chiu Lin
China manages the largest monoculture plantations in the world, with 24% being Chinese fir plantations. Maximizing the ecosystem services of Chinese fir plantations has important implications in global carbon cycle and biodiversity protection. Assisted natural regeneration (ANR) is a practice to convert degraded lands into more productive forests with great ecosystems services. However, the quantitative understanding of ANR ecosystem service benefits is very limited. We conducted a comprehensive field manipulation experiment to evaluate the ANR...

Seasonal rainfall in subtropical montane cloud forests drives demographic fluctuations in a Green-backed Tit population

Ming-Tang Shiao, Mei-Chen Chuang, Hsiao-Wei Yuan & Ying Wang
Montane birds are vulnerable to climate change. However, the mechanisms by which weather drives demographic processes in montane birds have seldom been investigated. We conducted a long-term study (2009–2019) on the Green-backed Tit (Parus monticolus), an insectivorous passerine, in the montane cloud forest of subtropical Taiwan. We explored the effects of weather variability on the productivity and survival of adult Green-backed Tits. Nest survival was negatively associated with seasonal rainfall during the breeding season (April–July)...

Impact of upwelling on phytoplankton blooms and hypoxia along the Chinese coast in the East China Sea

Chung-Chi Chen, Fuh-Kwo Shiah, Gwo-Ching Gong & Tzong-Yueh Chen
This study evaluates the rarely observed phenomenon of the simultaneous occurrences of phytoplankton blooms, hypoxia, and upwelling along the Zhejiang coast in the East China Sea. Results show that the upwelling uplifted bottom water to 5–10 m below the surface. In the upwelling region, phytoplankton blooms (Chl a = 10.9 μg L−1) occurred and hypoxia or low-oxygen appeared below the surface water. High concentrations of nitrate and phosphate were regenerated in the hypoxic regions, corresponding...

Data from: Litter type and termites regulate root decomposition across contrasting savanna land-uses

Stuart W. Smith, James D. M. Speed, John Bukombe, Shombe N. Hassan, Richard D. Lyamuya, Philipo Jacob Mtweve, Anders Sundsdal & Bente J. Graae
Decomposition is a vital ecosystem process, increasingly modified by human activity. Theoretical frameworks and empirical studies that aim to understand the interplay between human land-use, macro-fauna and decomposition processes have primarily focused on leaf and wood litter. For a whole-plant understanding of how land-use and macro-fauna influence decomposition, investigating root litter is required. Using litterbags, we quantified rates of root decomposition across contrasting tropical savanna land-uses, namely wildlife and fire-dominated protected areas and livestock pastureland...

Data from: Fighting experience alters brain androgen receptor expression dependent on testosterone status

Cheng-Yu Li, Ryan L. Earley, Shu-Ping Huang, Yuying Hsu, S.-P. Huang & C.-Y. Li
Contest decisions are influenced by the outcomes of recent fights (winner–loser effects). Steroid hormones and serotonin are closely associated with aggression and therefore probably also play important roles in mediating winner–loser effects. In mangrove rivulus fish, Kryptolebias marmoratus, individuals with higher testosterone (T), 11-ketotestosterone and cortisol levels are more capable of winning, but titres of these hormones do not directly mediate winner–loser effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of winning/losing experiences on brain...

Morphological and isotope data on three passerines in Taiwan

Pei-Jen Shaner & Yu‐Cheng Hsu
The niche variation hypothesis (NVH) predicts that populations with wider niches exhibit greater morphological variation through increased inter-individual differences in both niche and morphology. In this study, we examined niche-trait relationships in three passerine species (Cyanoderma ruficeps, Sinosuthora webbiana, Zosterops simplex). A total of 289 C. ruficeps from 7 sites, 259 S. webbiana from 8 sites, and 144 Z. simplex from 6 sites were sampled along an elevation gradient (0-2,700 m) in Taiwan from 2009...

Data from: Divergent selection and local adaptation in disjunct populations of an endangered conifer, Keteleeria davidiana var. formosana (Pinaceae)

Jing-Yu Fang, Jeng-Der Chung, Yu-Chung Chiang, Chung-Te Chang, Chia-Ying Chen & Shih-Ying Hwang
The present study investigated the genetic diversity, population structure, FST outliers, and extent and pattern of linkage disequilibrium in five populations of Keteleeria davidiana var. formosana, which is listed as a critically endangered species by the Council of Agriculture, Taiwan. Twelve amplified fragment length polymorphism primer pairs generated a total of 465 markers, of which 83.74% on average were polymorphic across populations, with a mean Nei’s genetic diversity of 0.233 and a low level of...

Data from: Reconstructing the invasion history of Heracleum persicum (Apiaceae) into Europe

Dilli P. Rijal, Torbjørn Alm, Šárka Jahodova, Hans K. Stenøein & Inger G. Alsos
Sparse, incomplete and inappropriate historical records of invasive species often hamper invasive species management interventions. Population genetic analyses of invaders might provide a suitable context for the identification of their source populations and possible introduction routes. Here, we describe the population genetics of Heracleum persicum Desf. ex Fisch and trace its route of introduction into Europe. Microsatellite markers revealed a significantly higher genetic diversity of H. persicum in its native range, and the loss of...

Data from: Highly overlapping winter diet in two sympatric lemming species revealed by DNA metabarcoding

Eeva M. Soininen, Gilles Gauthier, Frédéric Bilodeau, Dominique Berteaux, Ludovic Gielly, Pierre Taberlet, Galina Gussarova, Eva Bellemain, Kristian Hassel, Hans K. Stenøien, Laura Epp, Audun Schrøder-Nilsen, Christian Brochmann, Nigel G. Yoccoz & Audun Schrøder-Nielsen
Sympatric species are expected to minimize competition by partitioning resources, especially when these are limited. Herbivores inhabiting the High Arctic in winter are a prime example of a situation where food availability is anticipated to be low, and thus reduced diet overlap is expected. We present here the first assessment of diet overlap of high arctic lemmings during winter based on DNA metabarcoding of feces. In contrast to previous analyses based on microhistology, we found...

Data from: Genetic relationships and ecological divergence in Salix species and populations in Taiwan

Chun-Lin Huang, Chung-Te Chang, Bing-Hong Huang, Jeng-Der Chung, Jui-Hung Chen, Yu-Chung Chiang & Shih-Ying Hwang
Linking ecology with evolutionary biology is important to understand how environments drive population and species divergence. Phenotypically diverse Salix species, such as lowland riparian willow trees and middle- to high-elevation multistemmed shrubs and alpine dwarf shrubs, provide opportunities for studying genetic divergence driven by ecological factors. We used amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) to quantify the genetic variation of 185 individuals from nine populations of four Salix species in Taiwan. Our phylogenetic analyses distinguished two...

Data from: Genomic analysis of demographic history and ecological niche modeling in the endangered Sumatran Rhinoceros Dicerorhinus sumatrensis

, Chih-Ming Hung, Pei-Jen Shaner, James Denvir, Megan Justice, Shang-Fang Yang, Terri L. Roth, David A. Oehler, Jun Fan, Swanthana Rekulapally, Donald A. Primerano & Herman L. Mays
The vertebrate extinction rate over the past century is approximately 22–100 times greater than background extinction rates, and large mammals are particularly at risk. Quaternary megafaunal extinctions have been attributed to climate change, overexploitation, or a combination of the two. Rhinoceroses (Family: Rhinocerotidae) have a rich fossil history replete with iconic examples of climate-induced extinctions, but current pressures threaten to eliminate this group entirely. The Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) is among the most imperiled mammals...

Data from: Climate niche differentiation between two passerines despite ongoing gene flow

Shou-Hsien Li, Pei-Jen L. Shaner, Tzu-Hsuan Tsao, Rong-Chien Lin, Wei Liang, Chia-Fen Yeh, Xiao-Jun Yang, Fu-Min Lei, Fang Zhou, Can-Chao Yang & Yu-Cheng Hsu
Niche evolution underpins the generation and maintenance of biological diversity, but niche conservatism, in which niches remain little changed over time in closely related taxa and the role of ecology in niche evolution are continually debated. To test whether climate niches are conserved in two closely related passerines in East Asia – the vinous-throated (Paradoxornis webbianus) and ashy-throated (P. alphonsianus) parrotbills – we established their potential allopatric and sympatric regions using ecological niche models and...

Data from: Population genetic structure, local adaptation, and conservation genetics of Kandelia obovata

Yu Ruan, Bing-Hong Huang, Shih-Jie Lai, Yu-Ting Wan, Jun-Qing Li, Shong Huang & Pei-Chun Liao
Topographic changes during the Pleistocene glacial/interglacial cycles affected the distribution of coastline mangroves and influenced their population genetic structure. The submergence of the continental shelf off southeast China during the postglacial age caused coastline expansions and resulted in the colonization of mangroves. Here, we performed multilocus genome scans using amplified fragment-length polymorphisms to explore the effects of topography and natural selection in structuring Kandelia obovata populations. Long-term isolation by the Taiwan Strait since the end...

Data from: Community structure influences species’ abundance along environmental gradients

Antti P. Eloranta, Ingeborg P. Helland, Odd Terje Sandlund, Trygve Hesthagen, Ola Ugedal & Anders G. Finstad
Species response to abiotic environmental variation can be influenced by local community structure and interspecific interactions, particularly in restricted habitats such as islands and lakes. In temperate lakes, future increase in water temperature and runoff of terrestrial (allochthonous) dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are predicted to alter community composition and the overall ecosystem productivity. However, little is known about how the present community structure and abiotic environmental variation interact to affect the abundance of native fish...

Population genetics under the Massenerhebung effect: the influence of topography on the demography of Acer morrisonense (Sapindaceae)

Jui-Tse Chang, Min-Xin Luo, Hsin-Pei Lu, Yi-Ting Tseng & Pei-Chun Liao
Aim: The Massenerhebung effect (Mass elevation effect) refers to heat or wind-driven altitudinal distribution patterns of temperature-dependent parameters among massifs with narrower range and lower elevation around peripheral and isolated mountains compared to core and continuous ones. Although common in ecology, this effect is rarely discussed in population genetics. Here, we use genetic markers to reveal population genetic patterns and also test the mountain- and sky-barrier hypotheses relevant to the Massenerhebung distribution pattern of Acer...

Eggs survive through avian guts—A possible mechanism for transoceanic dispersal of flightless weevils

Hui-Yun Tseng, Si‐Min Lin, Tsui‐Wen Li, Chia‐Hsin Liou, Ace Kevin S. Amarga & Analyn Cabras
How flightless animals disperse to remote oceanic islands is a key unresolved question in biogeography. The flightless Pachyrhynchus weevils represent repetitive colonization history in West Pacific islands, which attracted our interests about how some weevils have successfully dispersed in the reverse direction against the sea current. Here, we propose endozoochory as a possible mechanism that the eggs of the weevils might be carried by embedded in the fruits as the food of frugivorous birds. In...

Data from: Trace DNA from insect skins: a comparison of five extraction protocols and direct PCR on chironomid pupal exuviae

Petra Kranzfelder, Torbjørn Ekrem & Elisabeth Stur
Insect skins (exuviae) are of extracellular origin and shed during moulting. The skins do not contain cells or DNA themselves, but epithelial cells and other cell-based structures might accidentally attach as they are shed. This source of trace DNA can be sufficient for PCR amplification and sequencing of target genes and aid in species identification through DNA barcoding or association of unknown life stages. Species identification is essential for biomonitoring programs, as species vary in...

Data from: Influence of gene flow on divergence dating – implications for speciation history of Takydromus grass lizards

Shu-Ping Tseng, Shou-Hsien Li, Hurng-Yi Wang, Si-Min Lin & Chia-Hung Hsieh
Dating the time of divergence and understanding speciation processes are central to the study of the evolutionary history of organisms but are notoriously difficult. The difficulty is largely rooted in variations in the ancestral population size or in the genealogy variation across loci. To depict the speciation processes and divergence histories of three monophyletic Takydromus species endemic to Taiwan, we sequenced 20 nuclear loci and combined with one mitochondrial locus published in GenBank. They were...

Data from: The first set of universal nuclear protein-coding loci markers for avian phylogenetic and population genetic studies

Yang Liu, Simin Liu, Chia-Fen Yeh, Nan Zhang, Guoling Chen, Pinjia Que, Lu Dong & Shou-Hsien Li
Multiple nuclear markers provide genetic polymorphism data for molecular systematics and population genetic studies. They are especially required for the coalescent-based analyses that can be used to accurately estimate species trees and infer population demographic histories. However, in avian evolutionary studies, these powerful coalescent-based methods are hindered by the lack of a sufficient number of markers. In this study, we designed PCR primers to amplify 136 nuclear protein-coding loci (NPCLs) by scanning the published Red...

Data from: Trophic niche width increases with bill size variation in a generalist passerine: a test of the niche variation hypothesis

Yu-Cheng Hsu, Pei-Jen Shaner, Chun-I Chang, Linhua Ke & Shuh-Ji Kao
1. The niche variation hypothesis (NVH) predicts that populations with wider niches are phenotypically more variable than populations with narrower niches, which is frequently used to explain diversifying processes such as ecological release. However, not all empirical evidence supports the NVH. Furthermore, a relationship between population phenotypic variation and niche width can be caused by sexual selection or environmental gradients, which should be carefully considered along with competition in explaining niche variation. 2. In this...

Data from: Evidence of trait shifts in response to forest disturbance in Taiwanese Carabus masuzoi (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

Yen-Ting Chen, Lan-Wei Yeh, I-Min Tso, Hui-Chen Lin, Liang-Kong Lin & Chung-Ping Lin
Shifts of functional traits are important because phenotypic responses of species to environmental changes caused by natural and anthropogenic disturbances are fundamental in determining the risk of population extinction. This study tested the effect of forest thinning on the body shape and male genital size of an endemic ground beetle species Carabus masuzoi (Imura and Satô 1989) (Coleoptera, Carabidae) in cypress plantations started approximately 30 years ago in central Taiwan. The beetles were sampled and...

Data from: Real or fake? natural and artificial social stimuli elicit divergent behavioral and neural responses in mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus

Cheng-Yu Li, Hans A. Hofmann, Melissa L. Harris & Ryan L. Earley
Understanding how the brain processes social information and generates adaptive behavioural responses is a major goal in neuroscience. We examined behaviour and neural activity patterns in socially relevant brain nuclei of hermaphroditic mangrove rivulus fish (Kryptolebias marmoratus) provided with different types of social stimuli: stationary model opponent, regular mirror, non-reversing mirror and live opponent. We found that: i) individuals faced with a regular mirror were less willing to interact with, delivered fewer attacks towards, and...

Data from: Scrutinizing key steps for reliable metabarcoding of environmental samples

Antton Alberdi, Ostaizka Aizpurua, M. Thomas P. Gilbert & Kristine Bohmann
1. Metabarcoding of environmental samples has many challenges and limitations that require carefully considered laboratory and analysis pipelines to ensure reliable results. We explore how decisions regarding study design, laboratory work and bioinformatic processing affect the final results, and provide guidelines for reliable study of environmental samples. 2. We evaluate the performance of four primer sets targeting COI and 16S regions characterising arthropod diversity in bat faecal samples, and investigate how metabarcoding results are affected...

Data from: The genetic relatedness in groups of joint-nesting Taiwan Yuhinas: low genetic relatedness with preferences for male kin

Mark Liu, Quen-Dian Zhong, Yi-Ru Cheng, Shou-Hsien Li, Shu Fang, Chang-En Pu, Hsiao-Wei Yuan & Sheng-Feng Shen
The relative importance of direct and indirect fitness and, thus, the role of kinship in the evolution of social behavior is much debated. Studying the genetic relatedness of interacting individuals is crucial to improving our understanding of these issues. Here, we used a seven-year data set to study the genetic structure of the Taiwan yuhina (Yuhina brunneciceps), a joint-nesting passerine. Ten microsatellite loci were used to investigate the pair-wised relatedness among yuhina breeding group members....

Data from: Historical demography of four gecko species specializing in boulder cave habitat – its implications in the evolutionary dead end hypothesis and conservation

Hung N. Nguyen, Chia-Wei Lu, Jui-Hua Chu, Lee L. Grismer, Chih-Ming Hung & Si-Min Lin
Specialization in narrow ecological niches might not only help species to survive in competitive or unique environments but also contribute to their extermination over evolutionary time. Although the “evolutionary dead end” hypothesis has long been debated, empirical evidence from species with detailed information on niche specialization and evolutionary history is still rare. Here we used a group of four closely related Cnemaspis gecko species that highly depend on granite boulder caves in the Mekong Delta...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    2
  • 2021
    7
  • 2020
    5
  • 2019
    1
  • 2018
    10
  • 2017
    4
  • 2016
    3
  • 2015
    6
  • 2014
    6
  • 2013
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    49

Affiliations

  • National Taiwan Normal University
    49
  • National Taiwan University
    12
  • Academia Sinica
    7
  • Taiwan Forestry Research Institute
    6
  • Norwegian University of Science and Technology
    6
  • National Museum of Natural Science
    4
  • National Dong Hwa University
    3
  • National Taiwan Ocean University
    3
  • Kunming Institute of Zoology
    3
  • Uppsala University
    3