7 Works

Eggs survive through avian guts—A possible mechanism for transoceanic dispersal of flightless weevils

Hui-Yun Tseng, Si‐Min Lin, Tsui‐Wen Li, Chia‐Hsin Liou, Ace Kevin S. Amarga & Analyn Cabras
How flightless animals disperse to remote oceanic islands is a key unresolved question in biogeography. The flightless Pachyrhynchus weevils represent repetitive colonization history in West Pacific islands, which attracted our interests about how some weevils have successfully dispersed in the reverse direction against the sea current. Here, we propose endozoochory as a possible mechanism that the eggs of the weevils might be carried by embedded in the fruits as the food of frugivorous birds. In...

Population genetics under the Massenerhebung effect: the influence of topography on the demography of Acer morrisonense (Sapindaceae)

Jui-Tse Chang, Min-Xin Luo, Hsin-Pei Lu, Yi-Ting Tseng & Pei-Chun Liao
Aim: The Massenerhebung effect (Mass elevation effect) refers to heat or wind-driven altitudinal distribution patterns of temperature-dependent parameters among massifs with narrower range and lower elevation around peripheral and isolated mountains compared to core and continuous ones. Although common in ecology, this effect is rarely discussed in population genetics. Here, we use genetic markers to reveal population genetic patterns and also test the mountain- and sky-barrier hypotheses relevant to the Massenerhebung distribution pattern of Acer...

Herbivores reduce seedling recruitment in alpine plant communities

Øystein H. Opedal, Kristin Nystuen, Dagmar Hagen, Håkon Holien, Mia Sørensen, Simone Lang, Sigrid Lindmo, G. RIchard Strimbeck & Bente Graae
Through changes in climate and other environmental factors, alpine tundra ecosystems are subject to increased cover of erect shrubs, reduced predictability of rodent dynamics, and changes in wild and domesticated herbivore densities. To predict the dynamics of these ecosystems, we need to understand how these simultaneous changes affect alpine vegetation. In the long term, vegetation dynamics may depend critically on seedling recruitment. To study drivers of alpine plant seedling recruitment, we set up a field...

Morphological and isotope data on three passerines in Taiwan

Pei-Jen Shaner & Yu‐Cheng Hsu
The niche variation hypothesis (NVH) predicts that populations with wider niches exhibit greater morphological variation through increased inter-individual differences in both niche and morphology. In this study, we examined niche-trait relationships in three passerine species (Cyanoderma ruficeps, Sinosuthora webbiana, Zosterops simplex). A total of 289 C. ruficeps from 7 sites, 259 S. webbiana from 8 sites, and 144 Z. simplex from 6 sites were sampled along an elevation gradient (0-2,700 m) in Taiwan from 2009...

Impact of upwelling on phytoplankton blooms and hypoxia along the Chinese coast in the East China Sea

Chung-Chi Chen, Fuh-Kwo Shiah, Gwo-Ching Gong & Tzong-Yueh Chen
This study evaluates the rarely observed phenomenon of the simultaneous occurrences of phytoplankton blooms, hypoxia, and upwelling along the Zhejiang coast in the East China Sea. Results show that the upwelling uplifted bottom water to 5–10 m below the surface. In the upwelling region, phytoplankton blooms (Chl a = 10.9 μg L−1) occurred and hypoxia or low-oxygen appeared below the surface water. High concentrations of nitrate and phosphate were regenerated in the hypoxic regions, corresponding...

Seasonal rainfall in subtropical montane cloud forests drives demographic fluctuations in a Green-backed Tit population

Ming-Tang Shiao, Mei-Chen Chuang, Hsiao-Wei Yuan & Ying Wang
Montane birds are vulnerable to climate change. However, the mechanisms by which weather drives demographic processes in montane birds have seldom been investigated. We conducted a long-term study (2009–2019) on the Green-backed Tit (Parus monticolus), an insectivorous passerine, in the montane cloud forest of subtropical Taiwan. We explored the effects of weather variability on the productivity and survival of adult Green-backed Tits. Nest survival was negatively associated with seasonal rainfall during the breeding season (April–July)...

Do I stay or do I go? Shifts in perch use by lizards during twilight suggests anticipatory behaviour

Si-Min Lin & Chih-Wei Chen
Anticipatory behaviour is the expectation of a near-future event based on information processed in the past and influences an animal’s tactical decisions, particularly when there are significant fitness consequences. The grass lizard (Takydromus viridipunctatus) perches on blades of grass at night which likely reduces the probability of predation by terrestrial predators such as snakes, rodents, and shrews. During twilight (starting 30 mins before sunrise) they move from above the grass to within grass clumps and...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    7

Affiliations

  • National Taiwan Normal University
    7
  • National Taiwan University
    2
  • Academia Sinica
    2
  • Air Navigation and Weather Services
    1
  • National Dong Hwa University
    1
  • University of Mindanao
    1
  • National Museum of Natural Science
    1
  • Lund University
    1
  • Taiwan Forestry Research Institute
    1
  • Nord University
    1