277 Works

Data from: Fish population genetic structure shaped by hydroelectric power plants in the upper Rhine catchment

Alexandre Gouskov, Marta Reyes, Lisa Wirthner-Bitterlin & Christoph Vorburger
The Rhine catchment in Switzerland has been transformed by a chain of hydroelectric power stations. We addressed the impact of fragmentation on the genetic structure of fish populations by focusing on the European chub (Squalius cephalus). This fish species is not stocked and copes well with altered habitats, enabling an assessment of the effects of fragmentation per se. Using microsatellites, we genotyped 2133 chub from 47 sites within the catchment fragmented by 37 hydroelectric power...

Data from: Transmission risk predicts avoidance of infected conspecifics in Trinidadian guppies

Jessica F. Stephenson, Sarah E. Perkins & Joanne Cable
1.Associating with conspecifics afflicted with infectious diseases increases the risk of becoming infected, but engaging in avoidance behaviour incurs the cost of lost social benefits. Across systems, infected individuals vary in the transmission risk they pose, so natural selection should favour risk‐sensitive avoidance behaviour that optimally balances the costs and benefits of sociality. 2.Here we use the guppy Poecilia reticulata‐Gyrodactylus turnbulli host‐parasite system to test the prediction that individuals avoid infected conspecifics in proportion to...

Data from: Plasmids and evolutionary rescue by drug resistance

Samuel J. Tazzyman & Sebastian Bonhoeffer
Antibiotic resistance provides evolutionary rescue for bacterial populations under the threat of extinction through antibiotics. It can arise de novo through mutation in the population, or be obtained from other bacterial populations via the transfer of a resistance-conferring plasmid. We use stochastic modelling methods to establish whether the most likely source of rescue is via a plasmid or via the chromosome, and show that contrary to what is assumed plasmids are not necessarily beneficial locations...

Data from: Only helpful when required: a longevity cost of harbouring defensive symbionts

Christoph Vorburger & Alexandre Gouskov
Maternally transmitted symbionts can spread in host populations if they provide a fitness benefit to their hosts. Hamiltonella defensa, a bacterial endosymbiont of aphids, protects hosts against parasitoids but only occurs at moderate frequencies in most aphid populations. This suggests that harbouring this symbiont is also associated with costs, yet the nature of these costs has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate an important and clearly defined cost: reduced longevity. Experimental infections with six different isolates...

Data from: Quality attracts parasites: host condition-dependent chemo-orientation of trematode larvae

Otto Seppälä & Katja Leicht
1. Environmental factors impairing physiological condition of organisms are assumed to predispose them to parasite infections. This is because host immune function is typically condition-dependent. However, poor physiological condition has been reported to reduce host susceptibility to parasites in various systems. 2. We examined whether such an effect can be due to altered exposure of hosts to active parasite transmission stages by investigating chemo-orientation of free-swimming cercariae larvae of a parasite Echinoparyphium aconiatum towards its...

Data from: Spontaneous nongenetic variation of group size creates cheater-free groups of social microbes

Michaela Amherd, Gregory J. Velicer & Olaya Rendueles
In social organisms, cheaters that gain a fitness advantage by defecting from the costs of cooperation reduce the average level of cooperation in a population. Such “cheating load” can be severe enough to cause local extinction events when cooperation is necessary for survival, but can also mediate group-level selection against cheaters across spatially structured groups that vary in cheater frequency. In cheater-laden populations, such variation could be generated by the formation of new homogeneous groups...

Data from: Invasiveness of plant pathogens depends on the spatial scale of host distribution

Alexey Mikaberidze, Christopher C. Mundt & Sebastian Bonhoeffer
Plant diseases often cause serious yield losses in agriculture. A pathogen’s invasiveness can be quantified by the basic reproductive number, R0. Since pathogen transmission between host plants depends on the spatial separation between them, R0 is strongly influenced by the spatial scale of the host distribution.We present a proof of principle of a novel approach to estimate the basic reproductive number, R0, of plant pathogens as a function of the size of a field planted...

Data from: De novo transcriptome analysis of the common New Zealand stick insect Clitarchus hookeri (Phasmatodea) reveals genes involved in olfaction, digestion and sexual reproduction

Chen Wu, Ross N Crowhurst, Alice B. Dennis, Victoria G. Twort, Shanlin Liu, Richard D. Newcomb, Howard A. Ross & Thomas R. Buckley
Phasmatodea, more commonly known as stick insects, have been poorly studied at the molecular level for several key traits, such as components of the sensory system and regulators of reproduction and development, impeding a deeper understanding of their functional biology. Here, we employ de novo transcriptome analysis to identify genes with primary functions related to female odour reception, digestion, and male sexual traits in the New Zealand common stick insect Clitarchus hookeri (White). The female...

Data from: A global meta-analysis on the ecological drivers of forest restoration success

Renato Crouzeilles, Michael Curran, Mariana S. Ferreira, David B. Lindenmayer, Carlos E. V. Grelle & José M. Rey Benayas
Two billion ha have been identified globally for forest restoration. Our meta-analysis encompassing 221 study landscapes worldwide reveals forest restoration enhances biodiversity by 15–84% and vegetation structure by 36–77%, compared with degraded ecosystems. For the first time, we identify the main ecological drivers of forest restoration success (defined as a return to a reference condition, that is, old-growth forest) at both the local and landscape scale. These are as follows: the time elapsed since restoration...

Data from: Infection-induced behavioural changes reduce connectivity and the potential for disease spread in wild mice contact networks

Patricia C. Lopes, Per Block & Barbara König
Infection may modify the behaviour of the host and of its conspecifics in a group, potentially altering social connectivity. Because many infectious diseases are transmitted through social contact, social connectivity changes can impact transmission dynamics. Previous approaches to understanding disease transmission dynamics in wild populations were limited in their ability to disentangle different factors that determine the outcome of disease outbreaks. Here we ask how social connectivity is affected by infection and how this relationship...

Data from: Genetic connectivity of the moth pollinated tree Glionnetia sericea in a highly fragmented habitat

Aline Finger, Christopher N. Kaiser-Bunbury, Chris J. Kettle, Terence Valentin & Jaboury Ghazoul
Long-distance gene flow is thought to be one prerequisite for the persistence of plant species in fragmented environments. Human influences have led to severe fragmentation of native habitats in the Seychelles islands, with many species surviving only in small and isolated populations. The endangered Seychelles endemic tree Glionnetia sericea is restricted to altitudes between 450 m and 900 m where the native forest vegetation has been largely lost and replaced with exotic invasives over the...

Data from: Parasites driving host diversity: incidence of disease correlated with Daphnia clonal turnover

Patrick Turko, Christoph Tellenbach, Esther Keller, Nadine Tardent, Barbara Keller, Piet Spaak & Justyna Wolinska
According to the Red Queen hypothesis, clonal diversity in asexual populations could be maintained by negative frequency-dependant selection by co-evolving parasites. If common clones are selected against and rare clones gain a concomitant advantage, we expect that clonal turnover should be faster during parasite epidemics than between them. We tested this hypothesis exploring field data of the Daphnia – Caullerya host-parasite system. The clonal make-up and turnover of the Daphnia host population was tracked with...

Data from: Migration patterns and changes in population biology associated with the worldwide spread of the oilseed rape pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans

Azita Dilmaghani, Pierre Gladieux, Lilian Gout, Tatiana Giraud, Patrick C. Brunner, Anna Stachowiak, Marie-Hélène Balesdent & Thierry Rouxel
Pathogen introductions into novel areas can lead to the emergence of new fungal diseases of plants. Understanding the origin, introduction pathways, possible changes in reproductive system and population size of fungal pathogens is essential in devising an integrated strategy for the control of these diseases. We used minisatellite markers to infer the worldwide invasion history of the fungal plant pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans, which causes stem canker (blackleg) of oilseed and vegetable brassicas. Clustering analyses partitioned...

Data from: Aphid specialization on different summer hosts is associated with strong genetic differentiation and unequal symbiont communities despite a common mating habitat

Christoph Vorburger, Jenny Herzog & Romain Rouchet
Specialization on different host plants can promote evolutionary diversification of herbivorous insects. Work on pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) has contributed significantly to the understanding of this process, demonstrating that populations associated with different host plants exhibit performance trade-offs across hosts, show adaptive host choice and genetic differentiation, and possess different communities of bacterial endosymbionts. Populations specialized on different secondary host plants during the parthenogenetic summer generations are also described for the black bean aphid (Aphis...

Data from: Experimental evolution of parasitoid infectivity on symbiont-protected hosts leads to the emergence of genotype-specificity

Romain Rouchet & Christoph Vorburger
Host-parasitoid interactions may lead to strong reciprocal selection for traits involved in host defense and parasitoid counter-defense. In aphids, individuals harboring the facultative bacterial endosymbiont Hamiltonella defensa exhibit enhanced resistance to parasitoid wasps. We used an experimental evolution approach to investigate the ability of the parasitoid wasp Lysiphlebus fabarum to adapt to the presence of H. defensa in its aphid host Aphis fabae. Sexual populations of the parasitoid were exposed for eleven generations to a...

Data from: How do leaf trait values change spatially and temporally with light availability in a grassland diversity experiment?

Dörte Bachmann, Christiane Roscher & Nina Buchmann
Complementarity in light use might increase light exploitation and could be an important mechanism explaining the coexistence of multiple species in plant communities of increasing diversity. We measured vertical light profiles and leaf traits related to light acquisition and light use in 40 mixtures of varying species richness (SR, 2, 4, 8 and 16) and functional group richness (FR, 1-4) in a large grassland biodiversity experiment at five different times during the growing season. Light...

Data from: Population structure of the invasive forest pathogen Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus

Andrin Gross, Tsuyoshi Hosoya & Valentin Queloz
Understanding the genetic diversity and structure of invasive pathogens in source and introduced areas is crucial to reveal hidden biological aspects of an organism, to reconstruct the course of invasions and to establish effective control measures. Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus (anamorph: Chalara fraxinea) is an invasive and highly destructive fungal pathogen on common ash Fraxinus excelsior in Europe and occurs natively in east Asia. To get insights into the dispersal mechanism and the history of invasion, we...

Data from: Local human pressures influence gene flow in a hybridizing Daphnia species complex

Benjamin Alric, Markus Möst, Isabelle Domaizon, Cecile Pignol, Piet Spaak & Marie-Elodie Perga
Anthropogenic environmental changes are considered critical drivers of the genetic structure of populations and communities through, for example, the facilitation of introgressive hybridization between syntopic species. However, the mechanisms by which environmental perturbations trigger changes in the genetic structure of populations and communities, such as the processes that determine the directionality of hybridization and patterns of mitochondrial introgression over many generations, remain largely unexplored. In this study, the changes in genetic structure of hybridizing members...

Data from: Rapid evolution of symbiont-mediated resistance compromises biological control of aphids by parasitoids

Heidi Kaech, Hugo Mathé-Hubert, Alice Dennis, Christoph Vorburger & Alice B. Dennis
There is growing interest in biological control as a sustainable and environmentally friendly way to control pest insects. Aphids are among the most detrimental agricultural pests worldwide, and parasitoid wasps are frequently employed for their control. The use of asexual parasitoids may improve the effectiveness of biological control because only females kill hosts and because asexual populations have a higher growth rate than sexuals. However, asexuals may have a reduced capacity to track evolutionary change...

Data from: Socio-economic impact classification of alien taxa (SEICAT)

Sven Bacher, Tim M. Blackburn, Franz Essl, Piero Genovesi, Jaakko Heikkilä, Jonathan M. Jeschke, Glyn Jones, Reuben Keller, Marc Kenis, Christoph Kueffer, Angeliki F. Martinou, Wolfgang Nentwig, Jan Pergl, Petr Pyšek, Wolfgang Rabitsch, David M. Richardson, Helen E. Roy, Wolf-Christian Saul, Riccardo Scalera, Montserrat Vila, John R. U. Wilson, Sabina Kumschick & Sabrina Kumschick
Many alien taxa are known to cause socio-economic impacts by affecting the different constituents of human well-being (security; material and non-material assets; health; social, spiritual and cultural relations; freedom of choice and action). Attempts to quantify socio-economic impacts in monetary terms are unlikely to provide a useful basis for evaluating and comparing impacts of alien taxa because they are notoriously difficult to measure and important aspects of human well-being are ignored. Here, we propose a...

Data from: Yield of temperate forage grassland species is either largely resistant or resilient to experimental summer drought

Daniel Hofer, Matthias Suter, Eamon Haughey, John A. Finn, Nyncke J. Hoekstra, Nina Buchmann & Andreas Lüscher
Due to climate change, an increasing frequency and severity of drought events are expected to impair grassland productivity, particularly of intensively managed temperate grasslands. To assess drought impacts, a common field experiment to manipulate precipitation was set up at three sites (two Swiss and one Irish) using monocultures and mixtures with two and four key forage species. Species differed in their functional traits: a shallow-rooted non-legume (Lolium perenne L.), a deep-rooted non-legume (Cichorium intybus L.),...

Data from: Cheaper isn’t always worse: more protective isolates of a defensive symbiont are less costly to the aphid host

Luis Cayetano, Lukas Rothacher, Jean-Christophe Simon, Christoph Vorburger & J.-C. Simon
Defences against parasites are typically associated with costs to the host that contribute to the maintenance of variation in resistance. This also applies to the defence provided by the facultative bacterial endosymbiont Hamiltonella defensa, which protects its aphid hosts against parasitoid wasps while imposing life-history costs. To investigate the cost–benefit relationship within protected hosts, we introduced multiple isolates of H. defensa to the same genetic backgrounds of black bean aphids, Aphis fabae, and we quantified...

Data from: Plant life history stage and nurse age change the development of ecological networks in an arid ecosystem

Gianalberto Losapio, Francisco I. Pugnaire, Michael J. O'Brien & Christian Schöb
Understanding how ecological networks are organised over the course of an organism’s lifetime is crucial for predicting the dynamics of interacting populations and communities across temporal scales. However, most studies so far considered only one life history stage at a time, such as adult, when studying networks of interacting species. Therefore, knowledge about how multiple life history stages affect the development and stability of plant–plant association networks is lacking. We measured the understory adult plant...

Data from: Back from the brink: potential for genetic rescue in a critically endangered tree

Aline Finger, Chris J Kettle, Christopher N Kaiser-Bunbury, Terence Valentin, Denis Matatiken, Damien Dudee & Jaboury Ghazoul
Rare plant species are vulnerable to genetic erosion and inbreeding associated with small population size and isolation due to increasing fragmentation, though the degree to which these problems undermine population viability remains debated. We explore genetic and reproductive processes in the critically endangered long-lived tropical tree Medusagyne oppositifolia, an endemic to the Seychelles with a naturally patchy distribution. This species is failing to recruit in three of its four populations. We evaluate whether recruitment failure...

Data from: Resilience of seed production to a severe El Niño‐induced drought across functional groups and dispersal types

Michael J. O'Brien, Daniel Peréz-Aviles & Jennifer S. Powers
More frequent and severe El Niño Southern Oscillations (ENSO) are causing episodic periods of decreased rainfall. Although the effects of these ENSO-induced droughts on tree growth and mortality have been well studied, the impacts on other demographic rates such as reproduction are less well known. We use a four-year seed rain dataset encompassing the most severe ENSO-induced drought in more than 30 years to assess the resilience (i.e. resistance and recovery) of the seed composition...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    58
  • 2020
    40
  • 2019
    23
  • 2018
    24
  • 2017
    33
  • 2016
    30
  • 2015
    17
  • 2014
    25
  • 2013
    12
  • 2012
    10

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    261
  • Text
    14
  • Image
    1
  • Journal Article
    1

Affiliations

  • Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich
    249
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    29
  • University of Zurich
    29
  • ETH Zurich
    25
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    21
  • Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research
    13
  • University of Oxford
    8
  • Columbia University
    7
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    7
  • Spanish National Research Council
    7