12 Works

Data from: Worldwide population genetic structure of the oriental fruit moth (Grapholita molesta), a globally invasive pest

Heather Kirk, Silvia Dorn & Dominique Mazzi
Background: Invasive pest species have large impacts on agricultural crop yields, and understanding their population dynamics is important for ensuring food security. The oriental fruit moth Grapholita molesta is a cosmopolitan pest of stone and pome fruit species including peach and apple, and historical records indicate that it has invaded North and South America, Europe, Australia and Africa from its putative native range in Asia over the past century. Results: We used 13 microsatellite loci,...

Data from: Cross-scale interactions among bark beetles, climate change and wind disturbances a landscape modeling approach

Christian Temperli, Harald K. M. Bugmann, Ché Elkin & Harald Bugmann
Bark beetles are a key forest disturbance agent worldwide, with their impact shaped by climate, forest susceptibility, and interactions with other disturbances such as windthrow and fire. There is ample evidence on the interactions among these factors at small spatial and temporal scales, but projecting their long-term and landscape-scale impacts remains a challenge. We developed a spatially explicit model of European spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus) dynamics that incorporates beetle phenology and forest susceptibility, and...

Data from: Evolution under changing climates: climatic niche stasis despite rapid evolution in a non-native plant

Jake M. Alexander
A topic of great current interest is the capacity of populations to adapt genetically to rapidly changing climates, for example by evolving the timing of life-history events, but this is challenging to address experimentally. I use a plant invasion as a model system to tackle this question by combining molecular markers, a common garden experiment and climatic niche modelling. This approach reveals that non-native Lactuca serriola originates primarily from Europe, a climatic subset of its...

European Database of Seismogenic Faults (EDSF)

Roberto Basili, Vanja Kastelic, Mine Betül Demircioglu, David Garcia Moreno, Eliza S. Nemser, Patrizio Petricca, Sotiris P. Sboras, Glenda M. Besana-Ostman, João Cabral, Thierry Camelbeeck, Riccardo Caputo, Laurentiu Danciu, Hilal Domaç, João Filipe de Barros Duarte Fonseca, Julián García-Mayordomo, Domenico Giardini, Branislav Glavatovic, Levent Gulen, Yigit Ince, Spyros Pavlides, Karin Sesetyan, Gabriele Tarabusi, Mara Monica Tiberti, Murat Utkucu, Gianluca Valensise … & Jochen Wössner
The European Database of Seismogenic Faults (EDSF) was compiled in the framework of the EU Project SHARE, Work Package 3, Task 3.2. EDSF includes only faults that are deemed to be capable of generating earthquakes of magnitude equal to or larger than 5.5 and aims at ensuring a homogenous input for use in ground-shaking hazard assessment in the Euro-Mediterranean area. Several research institutions participated in this effort with the contribution of many scientists (see the...

Data from: No association between sperm competition and sperm length variation across dung flies (Scathophagidae)

Manmohan D. Sharma, Aria M. Minder & David J. Hosken
Sperm length is extremely variable across species, but a general explanation for this variation is lacking. However, when the risk of sperm competition is high, sperm length is predicted to be less variable within species, and there is some evidence for this in birds and social insects. Here, we examined intraspecific variation in sperm length, both within and between males, and its potential associations with sperm competition risk and variation in female reproductive tract morphology...

Data from: Faster clonal turnover in high-infection habitats provides evidence for parasite-mediated selection

Dorota Paczesniak, Sofia Adolfsson, Katri Liljeroos, Kirsten Klappert, Curt M. Lively & Jukka Jokela
According to the Red Queen hypothesis for sex, parasite-mediated selection against common clones counterbalances the reproductive advantage of asexual lineages, which would otherwise outcompete sexual conspecifics. Such selection on the clonal population is expected to lead to a faster clonal turnover in habitats where selection by parasites is stronger. We tested this prediction by comparing the genetic structure of clonal and sexual populations of freshwater snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum between years 2003 and 2007 in three...

Data from: Genetic constraints underlying human reproductive timing in a premodern Swiss village

Anja Bürkli & Erik Postma
The trade-off between reproductive investment in early versus late life is central to life-history theory. Despite abundant empirical evidence supporting different versions of this trade-off, the specific trade-off between age at first reproduction (AFR) and age at last reproduction (ALR) has received little attention, especially in long-lived species with a pronounced reproductive senescence such as humans. Using genealogical data for a 19th-century Swiss village, we (i) quantify natural selection acting on reproductive timing, (ii) estimate...

Data from: Interactions between C:N:P stoichiometry and soil macrofauna control dung decomposition of savanna herbivores

Judith Sitters, Marc-Jacques Maechler, Peter J. Edwards, Werner Suter & Harry Olde Venterink
1. Although dung of mammalian herbivores is an important pathway for nutrient return in savanna ecosystems, differences in dung decomposition rates among species have been little studied. 2. We measured rates of dung deposition and decomposition for various herbivores in a moist Tanzanian savanna, and related differences among species to nutrient concentrations and the activities of soil macrofauna (e.g., different mesh sizes of decomposition bags, or presence and absence of dung beetles). 3. Dung C:N:P...

Data from: The role of bacteriocins as selfish genetic elements

R. Fredrik Inglis, Bihter Bayramoglu, Osnat Gillor & Martin Ackermann
Bacteria produce a wide arsenal of toxic compounds in order to kill competing species. Bacteriocins, protein-based toxins produced by nearly all bacteria, have generally been considered a ubiquitous anti-competitor strategy, used to kill competing bacterial strains. Some of these bacteriocins are encoded on plasmids, which also code for closely linked immunity compounds (thereby rendering toxin producing cells immune to their own toxin). However, the production of bacteriocins can also be interpreted as a means to...

SHARE European Earthquake Catalogue (SHEEC) 1000-1899

Massimiliano Stucchi, Andrea Rovida, Augusto Antonio Gómez Capera, Pierre Alexandre, Thierry Camelbeeck, Mine Betül Demircioglu, Paolo Gasperini, Vasiliki Kouskouna, Roger M.W. Musson, Mircea Radulian, Karin Sesetyan, Susana Pires Vilanova, David Baumont, Hilmar Bungum, Donat Fäh, Wolfgang Lenhardt, Konstantinos Makropoulos, José Manuel Martínez Solares, Oona Scotti, Mladen Živčić, Paola Albini, Josep Batlló, Christos A. Papaioannou, Ruben Tatevossian, Mario Locati … & Domenico Giardini
The SHARE European Earthquake Catalogue (SHEEC) 1000-1899 has been compiled in the frame of the EC project "SHARE" (Seismic Hazard Harmonization in Europe; 2009-2012).nIt relies on the experience of the EC I3 project "Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology" (NERIES; 2006-2010), a module of which was dedicated to create the Europeann"Archive of Historical Earthquake Data" (AHEAD) and to establish methodologies to homogenously derive earthquake parameters from macroseismic data.nAHEAD has supplied the final earthquake list,...

Data from: Altruism can evolve when relatedness is low: evidence from bacteria committing suicide upon phage infection

Dominik Refardt, Tobias Bergmiller & Rolf Kümmerli
High relatedness among interacting individuals has generally been considered a precondition for the evolution of altruism. However, kin-selection theory also predicts the evolution of altruism when relatedness is low, as long as the cost of the altruistic act is minor compared to its benefit. Here, we demonstrate evidence for a low-cost altruistic act in bacteria. We investigated Escherichia coli responding to the attack of an obligately lytic phage by committing suicide in order to prevent...

Data from: The structural and functional connectivity of the grassland plant Lychnis flos-cuculi

Tsipe Aavik, Rolf Holderegger & Janine Bolliger
Understanding the relationship between structural and functional connectivity is essential for successful restoration and conservation management, particularly in intensely managed agricultural landscapes. We evaluated the relationship between structural and functional connectivity of the wetland plant Lychnis flos-cuculi in a fragmented agricultural landscape using landscape genetic and network approaches. First, we studied the effect of structural connectivity, such as geographic distance and various landscape elements (forest, agricultural land, settlements and ditch verges), on gene flow among...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich
    10
  • Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB)
    2
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    2
  • Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV)
    2
  • University of Lisbon (ULisboa)
    2
  • Boğaziçi University (BOUN)
    2
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    2
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH)
    2
  • National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP)
    1
  • Sapienza University of Rome (Uni Sapienza)
    1