24 Works

Data from: Cross-biome patterns in soil microbial respiration predictable from evolutionary theory on thermal adaptation

Mark A. Bradford, Rebecca L. McCulley, Thomas W. Crowther, Emily E. Oldfield, Stephen A. Wood & Noah Fierer
Climate warming may stimulate microbial metabolism of soil carbon, causing a carbon cycle-climate feedback whereby carbon is redistributed from soil to atmospheric CO2. The magnitude of this feedback is uncertain, in part because warming-induced shifts in microbial physiology and/or community composition could retard or accelerate soil carbon losses. Here, we measure microbial respiration rates for soils collected from 22 sites in each of three years, at locations spanning boreal to tropical climates. Respiration was measured...

Data from: Trait means, trait plasticity and trait differences to other species jointly explain species performances in grasslands of varying diversity

Christiane Roscher, Marlén Gubsch, Annett Lipowsky, Jens Schumacher, Alexandra Weigelt, Nina Buchmann, Ernst-Detlef Schulze & Bernhard Schmid
Functional traits may help to explain the great variety of species performances in plant communities, but it is not clear whether the magnitude of trait values of a focal species or trait differences to co-occurring species are key for trait-based predictions. In addition, trait expression within species is often plastic, but this variation has been widely neglected in trait-based analyses. We studied functional traits and plant biomass of 59 species in 66 experimental grassland mixtures...

Data from: Microbiome interactions shape host fitness

Alison L. Gould, Vivian Zhang, Lisa Lamberti, Eric W. Jones, Benjamin Obadia, Nikolaos Korasidis, Alex Gavryushkin, Jean M. Carlson, Niko Beerenwinkel & William B. Ludington
Gut bacteria can affect key aspects of host fitness, such as development, fecundity, and lifespan, while the host, in turn, shapes the gut microbiome. However, it is unclear to what extent individual species versus community interactions within the microbiome are linked to host fitness. Here, we combinatorially dissect the natural microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster and reveal that interactions between bacteria shape host fitness through life history tradeoffs. Empirically, we made germ-free flies colonized with each...

Data from: The effects of rainforest fragment area on the strength of plant-pathogen interactions

Ashwin Viswanathan, Jaboury Ghazoul, Ganesh Honwad, N. Arun Kumar & Robert Bagchi
Pathogenic interactions between fungi and plants facilitate plant species coexistence and tropical rainforest diversity. Such interactions, however, may be affected by forest fragmentation as fungi are susceptible to anthropogenic disturbance. To examine how fragmentation affects fungus-induced seed and seedling mortality, we sowed seeds of six plant species in soils collected from 21 forest fragments. We compared seedling establishment in unmanipulated soils to soils treated with fungicides. Fungicides increased germination of Toona ciliata seeds and decreased...

Data from: Ecological divergence plays an important role in strong but complex reproductive isolation in campions (Silene)

Sophie Karrenberg, Xiaodong Liu, Emelie Hallander, Adrien Favre, Joelle Herforth Rahmé & Alex Widmer
New species arise through the evolution of reproductive barriers between formerly interbreeding lineages. Yet, comprehensive assessments of potential reproductive barriers, which are needed to make inferences on processes driving speciation, are only available for a limited number of systems. In this study, we estimated individual and cumulative strengths of seven prezygotic and six postzygotic reproductive barriers between the recently diverged taxa Silene dioica (L.) Clairv. and S. latifolia Poiret using both published and new data....

Data from: Spatial variation in throughfall, soil, and plant water isotopes in a temperate forest

Gregory R. Goldsmith, Scott T. Allen, Sabine Braun, Nadine Engbersen, Clara Romero González-Quijano, James W. Kirchner & Rolf T.W. Siegwolf
Studies of stable isotopes of water in the environment have been fundamental to advancing our understanding of how water moves through the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum; however, much of this research focuses on how water isotopes vary in time, rather than in space. We examined the spatial variation in the δ18O and δ2H of throughfall and bulk soil water, as well as branch xylem and bulk leaf water of Picea abies (Norway Spruce) and Fagus sylvatica (Beech),...

Data from: Measurement of infection efficiency of a major wheat pathogen using time-resolved imaging of disease progress

Petteri Karisto, Susanne Dora & Alexey Mikaberidze
Infection efficiency is a key epidemiological parameter that determines the proportion of pathogen spores able to infect and cause lesions once they have landed on a susceptible plant tissue. In this study, we present an improved method to measure infection efficiency of Zymoseptoria tritici using a replicated greenhouse experiment. Z. tritici is a fungal pathogen that infects wheat leaves and causes Septoria tritici blotch (STB), a major disease of wheat worldwide. We devised an original...

Data from: The balance of canopy and soil effects determines intraspecific differences in foundation species’ effects on associated plants

Nuria Pistón, Richard Michalet, Christian Schöb, Petr Macek, Cris Armas & Francisco I. Pugnaire
1. The impact of plant-plant interactions on species diversity patterns has been broadly addressed in stressful environments, such as alpine ecosystems, where foundation species promote species richness by creating habitat for other species. However, foundation species with contrasting phenotypes might modify the microhabitat differently, which would alter the subordinate community composition, and coincide with distinct feedback effects of those subordinate species on the foundation species. However, the precise interaction mechanisms that facilitate species are not...

Data from: The predictability of a lake phytoplankton community, over time-scales of hours to years

Mridul K. Thomas, Simone Fontana, Marta Reyes, Michael Kehoe & Francesco Pomati
Forecasting changes to ecological communities is one of the central challenges in ecology. However, nonlinear dependencies, biotic interactions and data limitations have limited our ability to assess how predictable communities are. We used a machine learning approach and environmental monitoring data (biological, physical and chemical) to assess the predictability of phytoplankton cell density in one lake across an unprecedented range of time scales. Communities were highly predictable over hours to months: model R2 decreased from...

Data from: Classification of cryptocurrency coins and tokens by the dynamics of their market capitalisations

Ke Wu, Spencer Wheatley & Didier Sornette
We empirically verify that the market capitalisations of coins and tokens in the cryptocurrency universe follow power-law distributions with significantly different values, with the tail exponent falling between 0.5 and 0.7 for coins, and between 1.0 and 1.3 for tokens. We provide a rationale for this, based on a simple proportional growth with birth & death model previously employed to describe the size distribution of firms, cities, webpages, etc. We empirically validate the model and...

Data from: Predation risk shaped by habitat and landscape complexity in urban environments

David Frey, Kevin Vega, Florian Zellweger, Jaboury Ghazoul, Dennis Hansen & Marco Moretti
1. Habitat loss and modification are hallmarks of anthropogenic ecosystems, but the consequences for ecosystem functions and services often remain unclear. Understanding these links in cities is complicated by strong but fine-scale differences in habitat structure among green space patches, and a high variance in habitat amount across urban landscapes. 2. We used airborne laser scanning (ALS) data to disentangle the effects of 3D woody habitat heterogeneity of urban home gardens, and woody habitat amount...

Data from: Do soil biota influence the outcome of novel interactions between plant competitors?

Aline Cardinaux, Simon Hart, Jake Alexander, Jake M. Alexander & Simon P. Hart
1. Species are shifting their ranges, for example to higher elevations, in response to climate change. Different plant species and soil microbiota will likely shift their ranges at different rates, giving rise to novel communities of plants and soil organisms. However, the ecological consequences of such novel plant-soil interactions are poorly understood. We experimentally simulated scenarios for novel interactions arising between high- and low elevation plants and soil biota following asynchronous climate change range shifts,...

Data from: Simplification of shade tree diversity reduces nutrient cycling resilience in coffee agroforestry

Maike Nesper, Christoph Kueffer, Smitha Krishnan, Cheppudira G. Kushalappa & Jaboury Ghazoul
1. Agroforestry systems are refuges for biodiversity and provide multiple ecosystem functions and services. Diverse multispecies shade tree canopies are increasingly replaced by monospecific shade, often dominated by non-native tree species. The loss of tree diversity and the nature of the dominating tree can have strong implications for ecosystem functions, e.g. nutrient cycling ultimately reducing crop production. 2. To understand direct and indirect impacts of shade trees on nutrient cycling and crop production, we studied...

Data from: Intransitive competition is common across five major taxonomic groups and is driven by productivity, competitive rank and functional traits.

Santiago Soliveres, Anika Lehmann, Steffen Boch, Florian Altermatt, Francesco Carrara, Thomas W. Crowther, Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, Anne Kempel, Daniel S. Maynard, Matthias C. Rillig, Brajesh K. Singh, Pankaj Trivedi & Eric Allan
1. Competition can be fully hierarchical or intransitive, and this degree of hierarchy is driven by multiple factors, including environmental conditions, the functional traits of the species involved or the topology of competition networks. Studies simultaneously analyzing these drivers of competition hierarchy are rare. Additionally, organisms compete either directly or via interference competition for resources or space, within a local neighbourhood or across the habitat. Therefore, the drivers of competition could change accordingly and depend...

Data from: Resilience of seed production to a severe El Niño‐induced drought across functional groups and dispersal types

Michael J. O'Brien, Daniel Peréz-Aviles & Jennifer S. Powers
More frequent and severe El Niño Southern Oscillations (ENSO) are causing episodic periods of decreased rainfall. Although the effects of these ENSO-induced droughts on tree growth and mortality have been well studied, the impacts on other demographic rates such as reproduction are less well known. We use a four-year seed rain dataset encompassing the most severe ENSO-induced drought in more than 30 years to assess the resilience (i.e. resistance and recovery) of the seed composition...

Data from: Plant life history stage and nurse age change the development of ecological networks in an arid ecosystem

Gianalberto Losapio, Francisco I. Pugnaire, Michael J. O'Brien & Christian Schöb
Understanding how ecological networks are organised over the course of an organism’s lifetime is crucial for predicting the dynamics of interacting populations and communities across temporal scales. However, most studies so far considered only one life history stage at a time, such as adult, when studying networks of interacting species. Therefore, knowledge about how multiple life history stages affect the development and stability of plant–plant association networks is lacking. We measured the understory adult plant...

Data from: Transmission risk predicts avoidance of infected conspecifics in Trinidadian guppies

Jessica F. Stephenson, Sarah E. Perkins & Joanne Cable
1.Associating with conspecifics afflicted with infectious diseases increases the risk of becoming infected, but engaging in avoidance behaviour incurs the cost of lost social benefits. Across systems, infected individuals vary in the transmission risk they pose, so natural selection should favour risk‐sensitive avoidance behaviour that optimally balances the costs and benefits of sociality. 2.Here we use the guppy Poecilia reticulata‐Gyrodactylus turnbulli host‐parasite system to test the prediction that individuals avoid infected conspecifics in proportion to...

Data from: Effective polyploidy causes phenotypic delay and influences bacterial evolvability

Lei Sun, Helen K. Alexander, Balazs Bogos, Daniel J. Kiviet, Martin Ackermann & Sebastian Bonhoeffer
Whether mutations in bacteria exhibit a noticeable delay before expressing their corresponding mutant phenotype was discussed intensively in the 1940s to 1950s, but the discussion eventually waned for lack of supportive evidence and perceived incompatibility with observed mutant distributions in fluctuation tests. Phenotypic delay in bacteria is widely assumed to be negligible, despite the lack of direct evidence. Here, we revisited the question using recombineering to introduce antibiotic resistance mutations into E. coli at defined...

Data from: Evolution during population spread affects plant performance in stressful environments

Nicky Lustenhouwer, Jennifer L. Williams & Jonathan M. Levine
1. Reliable predictions of population spread rates are essential to forecast biological invasions. Recent studies have shown that populations spreading through favourable habitat can rapidly evolve higher dispersal and reproductive rates at the expansion front, which accelerates spread velocity. However, spreading populations are likely to eventually encounter stressful conditions in the expanded range. How evolution during spread in favourable environments affects subsequent population growth in harsher environments is currently unknown. 2. We examined evolutionary change...

Data from: Below-ground resource partitioning alone cannot explain the biodiversity–ecosystem function relationship: a field test using multiple tracers

Annette Jesch, Kathryn E. Barry, Janneke M. Ravenek, Dörte Bachmann, Tanja Strecker, Alexandra Weigelt, Nina Buchmann, Hans De Kroon, Arthur Gessler, Liesje Mommer, Christiane Roscher & Michael Scherer-Lorenzen
1. Belowground resource partitioning is among the most prominent hypotheses for driving the positive biodiversity-ecosystem function relationship. However, experimental tests of this hypothesis in biodiversity experiments are scarce, and the available evidence is not consistent. 2. We tested the hypothesis that resource partitioning in space, in time, or in both space and time combined drives the positive effect of diversity on both plant productivity and community resource uptake. At the community level, we predicted that...

Data from: Lineages evolved under stronger sexual selection show superior ability to invade conspecific competitor populations

Joanne L. Godwin, Lewis G. Spurgin, L. Michalczyk, Oliver Y. Martin, Alyson J. Lumley, Tracey Chapman & Matthew J.G. Gage
Despite limitations on offspring production, almost all multicellular species use sex to reproduce. Sex gives rise to sexual selection, a widespread force operating through competition and choice within reproduction, however, it remains unclear whether sexual selection is beneficial for total lineage fitness, or if it acts as a constraint. Sexual selection could be a positive force because of selection on improved individual condition and purging of mutation load, summing into lineages with superior fitness. On...

Data from: Kin discrimination and outer membrane exchange in Myxococcus xanthus: a comparative analysis among natural isolates

Sébastien Wielgoss, Francesca Fiegna, Olaya Rendueles, Yuen-Tsu N. Yu & Gregory J. Velicer
Genetically similar cells of the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus cooperate at multiple social behaviours, including motility and multicellular development. Another social interaction in this species is outer-membrane exchange (OME), a behaviour of unknown primary benefit in which cells displaying closely related variants of the outer-membrane protein TraA transiently fuse and exchange membrane contents. Functionally incompatible TraA variants do not mediate OME, which led to the proposal that TraA incompatibilities determine patterns of intercellular cooperation in...

Data from: Simultaneous exposure to a pulsed and a prolonged anthropogenic stressor can alter consumer multifunctionality

Tiina Salo, Katja Rasanen, Christian Stamm, Francis J. Burdon & Otto Seppala
Ecosystems face multiple anthropogenic threats globally, and the effects of these environmental stressors range from individual-level organismal responses to altered system functioning. Understanding the combined effects of stressors on process rates mediated by individuals in ecosystems would greatly improve our ability to predict organismal multifunctionality (e.g. multiple consumer-mediated functions). We conducted a laboratory experiment to test direct and indirect, as well as immediate and delayed effects of a heat wave (pulsed stress) and micropollutants (MPs)...

Data from: Relative importance of chemical attractiveness to parasites for susceptibility to trematode infection

Laura Langeloh & Otto Seppälä
While the host immune system is often considered the most important physiological mechanism against parasites, pre-contact mechanisms determining exposure to parasites may also affect infection dynamics. For instance, chemical cues released by hosts can attract parasite transmission stages. We used the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis and its trematode parasite Echinoparyphium aconiatum to examine the role of host chemical attractiveness, physiological condition and immune function in determining its susceptibility to infection. We assessed host attractiveness through...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    24

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    24

Affiliations

  • Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich
    24
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    6
  • University of Zurich
    5
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    5
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    2
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    2
  • Berlin Brandenburg Institute of Advanced Biodiversity Research
    2
  • Spanish National Research Council
    2
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    2
  • Leipzig University
    2