62 Works

Data from: Testing the phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis in the presence and absence of inbreeding

Wolfgang Forstmeier, Malika Ihle, Pavlina Opatova, Katrin Martin, Ulrich Knief, Jana Albrechtová, Tomas Albrecht & Bart Kempenaers
The phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis suggests that females can judge male fertility by inspecting male phenotypic traits. This is because male sexually selected traits might correlate with sperm quality if both are sensitive to factors that influence male condition. A recent meta-analysis found little support for this hypothesis, suggesting little or no shared condition dependence. However, we recently reported that in captive zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) inbreeding had detrimental effects both on phenotypic traits and on...

Data from: Para-allopatry in hybridizing fire-bellied toads (Bombina bombina and B. variegata): inference from transcriptome-wide coalescence analyses

Beate Nürnberger, Konrad Lohse, Anna Fijarczyk, Jacek M. Szymura & Mark L. Blaxter
Ancient origins, profound ecological divergence, and extensive hybridization make the fire-bellied toads Bombina bombina and B. variegata (Anura: Bombinatoridae) an intriguing test case of ecological speciation. Previous modeling has proposed that the narrow Bombina hybrid zones represent strong barriers to neutral introgression. We test this prediction by inferring the rate of gene exchange between pure populations on either side of the intensively studied Kraków transect. We developed a method to extract high confidence sets of...

Data from: Genetic distinction between contiguous urban and rural multimammate mice in Tanzania despite gene flow

Sophie Gryseels, Joëlle Goüy De Bellocq, Rhodes Makundi, Kurt Vanmechelen, Jan Broeckhove, Vladimír Mazoch, Radim Šumbera, , Herwig Leirs & Stuart J. E. Baird
Special conditions are required for genetic differentiation to arise at a local geographical scale in the face of gene flow. The Natal multimammate mouse, Mastomys natalensis, is the most widely distributed and abundant rodent in sub-Saharan Africa. A notorious agricultural pest and a natural host for many zoonotic diseases, it can live in close proximity to man, and appears to compete with other rodents for the synanthropic niche. We surveyed its population genetic structure across...

Data from: Around the Mediterranean: an extreme example of loop migration in a long-distance migratory passerine

Petr Klvaňa, Jaroslav Cepák, Pavel Munclinger, Romana Michálková, Oldřich Tomášek & Tomas Albrecht
An important issue in migration research is how small-bodied passerines pass over vast geographical barriers; in European-African avian migration, these are represented by the Mediterranean Sea and the Sahara Desert. Eastern (passing Eastern Mediterranean), central (passing Apennine Peninsula) and western (via western Mediterranean) major migration flyways are distinguished for European migratory birds. The autumn and spring migration routes may differ (loop migration) and there could be a certain level of individual flexibility in how individuals...

Data from: An invasive species reverses the roles in a host-parasite relationship between bitterling fish and unionid mussels

Martin Reichard, Milan Vrtilek, Karel Douda & Carl Smith
The impact of multiple invading species can be magnified due to mutual facilitation, termed “invasional meltdown”, but invasive species can also be adversely affected by their interactions with other invaders. Using a unique reciprocal host-parasite relationship between a bitterling fish, Rhodeus amarus, and unionid mussels, we show that an invasive mussel reverses the roles in the relationship. Bitterling lay their eggs into mussel gills, and mussel larvae parasitize fish. Bitterling recently colonized Europe and parasitize...

Data from: Moderate heritability and low evolvability of sperm morphology in a species with high risk of sperm competition, the collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis

Anais Edme, Petr Zobač, Peter Korsten, Tomáš Albrecht, Tim Schmoll & Miloš Krist
Spermatozoa represent the morphologically most diverse type of animal cells and show remarkable variation in size across and also within species. To understand the evolution of this diversity, it is important to reveal to what degree this variation is genetic or environmental in origin and whether this depends on species’ life‐histories. Here we applied quantitative genetic methods to a pedigreed multigenerational data set of the collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis, a passerine bird with high levels...

Data from: Does developmental acclimatization reduce the susceptibility to predation in newt larvae?

Radovan Smolinsky & Lumir Gvozdik
Many organisms respond to the heterogeneity of abiotic environmental conditions by plastic modifications of their phenotypes (acclimation or acclimatization). Despite considerable research efforts in this area, the beneficial (adaptive) effect of acclimation or acclimatization is still debated. We examined whether development of newt larvae (Ichthyosaura alpestris) in different natural light and thermal conditions subsequently altered their susceptibility to predation in sun-exposed versus shaded tanks in nature. During predation trials in various light and temperature conditions,...

Data from: No evidence for host specialization or host-race formation in the European bitterling (Rhodeus amarus), a fish that parasitizes freshwater mussels

Martin Reichard, Josef Bryja, Matej Polačik & Carl Smith
Coevolutionary relationships between parasites and hosts can elevate the rate of evolutionary changes due to reciprocal adaptations between coevolving partners. Such relationships can result in the evolution of host specificity. Recent methodological advances have permitted the recognition of cryptic lineages, with important consequences for our understanding of biological diversity. We used the European bitterling (Rhodeus amarus), a freshwater fish that parasitizes unionid mussels, to investigate host specialization across regions of recent and ancient sympatry between...

Data from: Body size, swimming speed, or thermal sensitivity? Predator-imposed selection on amphibian larvae

Lumír Gvoždík & Radovan Smolinský
Background: Many animals rely on their escape performance during predator encounters. Because of its dependence on body size and temperature, escape velocity is fully characterized by three measures, absolute value, size-corrected value, and its response to temperature (thermal sensitivity). The primary target of the selection imposed by predators is poorly understood. We examined predator (dragonfly larva)-imposed selection on prey (newt larvae) body size and characteristics of escape velocity using replicated and controlled predation experiments under...

Data from: Genetics, morphology, advertisement calls, and historical records distinguish six new polyploid species of African clawed frog (Xenopus, Pipidae) from West and Central Africa

Ben J. Evans, Timothy F. Carter, Eli Greenbaum, Václav Gvoždík, Darcy B. Kelley, Patrick J. McLaughlin, Olivier S. G. Pauwels, Daniel M. Portik, Edward L. Stanley, Richard C. Tinsley, Martha L. Tobias & David C. Blackburn
African clawed frogs, genus Xenopus, are extraordinary among vertebrates in the diversity of their polyploid species and the high number of independent polyploidization events that occurred during their diversification. Here we update current understanding of the evolutionary history of this group and describe six new species from west and central sub-Saharan Africa, including four tetraploids and two dodecaploids. We provide information on molecular variation, morphology, karyotypes, vocalizations, and estimated geographic ranges, which support the distinctiveness...

Data from: Chemical defence in avian brood parasites: production and function of repulsive secretions in common cuckoo chicks

Alfréd Trnka, Milica Požgayová, Petr Procházka, Miroslav Capek & Marcel Honza
The use of active chemical defence against predators is relatively rare in birds. Among others, it has been reported for some members of family Cuculidae whose chicks, when threatened, expel dark foul-smelling liquid from their cloaca. Apart from the brood parasitic great spotted cuckoo Clamator glandarius, however, this phenomenon has not yet been systematically studied in any other cuckoo species. Here we investigated the repellent behaviour in the evicting brood parasite, the common cuckoo Cuculus...

Data from: Strategic exploitation of fluctuating asymmetry in male Endler's guppy courtship displays is modulated by social environment

Radomil Rezucha & Martin Reichard
Lateral asymmetry in signalling traits enables males to strategically exploit their best side. In many animals, both body colouration and fluctuating asymmetry are signals of male attractiveness. We demonstrated experimentally that even sexually naïve male Poecilia wingei were able to identify their most attractive side (i.e. that with a higher proportion of carotenoid pigmentation) and use it preferentially during courtship. Notably, males retained their strategic signalling in a male-biased social environment, whereas they ceased to...

Data from: PCR-based isolation of multigene families: lessons from the avian MHC class IIB

Reto Burri, Marta Promerová, Julien Goebel & Luca Fumagalli
The amount of sequence data available today highly facilitates the access to genes from many gene families. Primers amplifying the desired genes over a range of species are readily obtained by aligning conserved gene regions, and laborious gene isolation procedures can often be replaced by quicker PCR-based approaches. However, in the case of multigene families, PCR-based approaches bear the often ignored risk of incomplete isolation of family members. This problem is most prominent in gene...

Data from: Repeated intraspecific divergence in life span and aging of African annual fishes along an aridity gradient

Radim Blažek, Matej Polacik, Petr Kacer, Alessandro Cellerino, Radomil Řežucha, Caroline Methling, Oldrich Tomasek, Kaila Syslova, Eva Terzibasi-Tozzini, Tomas Albrecht, Milan Vrtílek & Martin Reichard
Life span and aging are substantially modified by natural selection. Across species, higher extrinsic (environmentally related) mortality (and hence shorter life expectancy) selects for the evolution of more rapid aging. However, among populations within species, high extrinsic mortality can lead to extended life span and slower aging as a consequence of condition-dependent survival. Using within-species contrasts of eight natural populations of Nothobranchius fishes in common garden experiments, we demonstrate that populations originating from dry regions...

Data from: Active farmsteads are year-round strongholds for farmland birds

Martin Šálek, Miroslav Bažant & Michał Żmihorski
1. Farmland birds have experienced substantial declines over recent decades and various conservation measures have been designed to halt their massive decrease. The effectiveness of these measures is however limited, due to inappropriate identification of crucial breeding and wintering habitats. Identification of appropriate habitats, like farmsteads, and understanding seasonal changes in species richness and abundance of farmland birds within these habitats may therefore be key for farmland bird conservation. 2. We investigated the effect of...

Data from: Sperm is a sexual ornament in rose bitterling

Carl Smith, Rowena Spence & Martin Reichard
In many taxa, odour cues mediate mating decisions. A key question is what these odours comprise, where they are produced, and what they signal. Using rose bitterling, fish that spawn in the gills of freshwater mussels, we investigated the role of sperm cues on female oviposition decisions using individuals of known MHC genotype. Male bitterling frequently released sperm prior to female oviposition and females responded with an increased probability of oviposition and released a greater...

Data from: Admixture of eastern and western European red deer lineages as a result of postglacial re-colonisation of the Czech Republic (Central Europe)

Jarmila Krojerová-Prokešová, Miroslava Barančeková & Petr Koubek
Due to a restriction of the distributional range of European red deer (Cervus elaphus L.) during the Quaternary and subsequent recolonization of Europe from different refugia, a clear phylogeographical pattern in genetic structure has been revealed using mitochondrial DNA markers. In Central Europe, 2 distinct, eastern and western, lineages of European red deer are present; however, admixture between them has not yet been studied in detail. We used mitochondrial DNA (control region and cytochrome b...

Data from: Metazoan parasites of African annual killifish (Nothobranchiidae): abundance, diversity, and their environmental correlates

Veronika Nezhybová, Martin Reichard, Radim Blažek & Markéta Ondračková.
Estimates of biodiversity and its global patterns are affected by parasite richness and specificity. Despite this, parasite communities are largely neglected in biodiversity estimates, especially in the tropics. We studied the parasites of annual killifish of the genus Nothobranchius that inhabit annually desiccating pools across the African savannah and survive the dry period as developmentally arrested embryos. Their discontinuous, non-overlapping generations make them a unique organism in which to study natural parasite fauna. We investigated...

GPS data of little owls

Martin Mayer, Martin Šálek, Anthony Fox, Frej Juhl Lindhøj, Lars Bo Jacobsen & Peter Sunde
Advances in bio-logging technology for wildlife monitoring have expanded our ability to study space use and behavior of many animal species at increasingly detailed scales. However, such data can be challenging to analyze due to autocorrelation of GPS positions. As a case study, we investigated spatiotemporal movements and habitat selection in the little owl (Athene noctua), a bird species that is declining in central Europe and verges on extinction in Denmark. We equipped 6 Danish...

Data from: The function of multiple ejaculations in bitterling

Carl Smith, Mark Warren, Romain Rouchet & Martin Reichard
In some taxa, males perform multiple ejaculations, which may function in sperm competition or in maintaining a baseline density of spermatozoa in the female reproductive tract to ensure fertilization, a process that has been termed ‘topping up’. We investigated the function of multiple ejaculations in two species of bitterling, the European bitterling (Rhodeus amarus) and Chinese rose bitterling (Rhodeus ocellatus). Bitterling oviposit in living freshwater mussels, with fertilization taking place within the mussel gill cavity....

Data from: Lessons learned from microsatellite development for non-model organisms using 454 pyrosequencing

Corine Schoebel, Sabine Brodbeck, Dominique Buehler, Carolina Cornejo, Jyoti Gajurel, Hanna Hartikainen, Daniela Keller, Marie Leys, Štěpánka Říčanová, Gernot Segelbacher, Silke Werth, Daniela Csencsics & C. N. Schoebel
Microsatellites, also known as simple sequence repeats (SSRs), are among the most commonly used marker types in evolutionary and ecological studies. Next Generation Sequencing techniques such as 454 pyrosequencing allow the rapid development of microsatellite markers in nonmodel organisms. 454 pyrosequencing is a straightforward approach to develop a high number of microsatellite markers. Therefore, developing microsatellites using 454 pyrosequencing has become the method of choice for marker development. Here, we describe a user friendly way...

Data from: Parentage analysis of Ansell's mole-rat family groups indicates a high reproductive skew despite relatively relaxed ecological constraints on dispersal

Hana Patzenhauerová, Jan Šklíba, Josef Bryja & Radim Šumbera
To better understand evolutionary pathways leading to eusociality, interspecific comparisons are needed, which would use a common axis, such as that of reproductive skew, to array species. African mole-rats (Bathyergidae, Rodentia) provide an outstanding model of social evolution because of a wide range of social organizations within a single family; however, their reproductive skew is difficult to estimate, due to their cryptic lifestyle. A maximum skew could theoretically be reached in groups where reproduction is...

Data from: Strong population genetic structuring in an annual fish, Nothobranchius furzeri, suggests multiple savannah refugia in southern Mozambique

Veronika Bartáková, Martin Reichard, Karel Janko, Matej Polačik, Radim Blažek, Kathrin Reichwald, Alessandro Cellerino & Josef Bryja
Background: Intraspecific genetic variation of African fauna has been signific antly affected by pronounced climatic fluctuations in Plio-Pleistocene, but, with the exception of large mammals, very limited empirical data on diversity of natural populations are available for savanna-dwelling animals. Nothobranchius furzeri is an annual fish from south-eastern Africa, inhabiting discrete temporary savannah pools outside main river alluvia. Their dispersal is limited and population processes affecting its genetic structure are likely a combination of those affecting...

Data from: Divergent evolutionary processes associated with colonization of offshore islands

Natália Martínková, Ross Barnett, Thomas Cucchi, Rahel Struchen, Marine Pascal, Michel Pascal, Martin C. Fischer, Thomas Higham, Selina Brace, Simon Y. W. Ho, Jean-Pierre Quéré, Paul O'Higgins, Laurent Excoffier, Gerald Heckel, A. Rus Hoelzel, Keith M. Dobney & Jeremy B. Searle
Oceanic islands have been a test ground for evolutionary theory, but here, we focus on the possibilities for evolutionary study created by offshore islands. These can be colonized through various means and by a wide range of species, including those with low dispersal capabilities. We use morphology, modern and ancient sequences of cytochrome b (cytb) and microsatellite genotypes to examine colonization history and evolutionary change associated with occupation of the Orkney archipelago by the common...

Data from: Influence of interspecific competitors on behavioral thermoregulation: developmental or acute plasticity?

Barbora Winterová & Lumír Gvoždík
Many ectotherms reduce their exposure to changing thermal conditions using behavioral thermoregulation. The effectiveness of behavioral thermoregulation in maintaining ectotherm body temperatures within the target range is influenced not only by environmental (operative) temperatures but also by the presence of other con- and heterospecific individuals. How species’ interactions affect behavioral thermoregulation is largely unknown. Theory predicts that species’ interactions could affect the plasticity of behavioral thermoregulation in two ways, i.e. by developmental plasticity of a...

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