71 Works

Data from: Population-specific responses to an invasive species

Martin Reichard, Karel Douda, Mirosław Przybyłski, Oana P. Popa, Eva Karbanová, Klára Matasová, Kateřina Rylková, Matej Polačik, Radim Blažek & Carl Smith
Predicting the impacts of non-native species remains a challenge. As populations of a species are genetically and phenotypically variable, the impact of non-native species on local taxa could crucially depend on population-specific traits and adaptations of both native and non-native species. Bitterling fishes are brood parasites of unionid mussels and unionid mussels produce larvae that parasitize fishes. We used common garden experiments to measure three key elements in the bitterling–mussel association among two populations of...

Data from: Empirical evidence for large X-effects in animals with undifferentiated sex chromosomes

Christophe Dufresnes, Tomasz Majtyka, Stuart J. E. Baird, Jörn F. Gerchen, Amaël Borzée, Romain Savary, Maria Ogielska, Nicolas Perrin & Matthias Stöck
Reproductive isolation is crucial for the process of speciation to progress. Sex chromosomes have been assigned a key role in driving reproductive isolation but empirical evidence from natural population processes has been restricted to organisms with degenerated sex chromosomes such as mammals and birds. Here we report restricted introgression at sex-linked compared to autosomal markers in a hybrid zone between two incipient species of European tree frog, Hyla arborea and H. orientalis, whose homologous X...

Data from: The function of multiple ejaculations in bitterling

Carl Smith, Mark Warren, Romain Rouchet & Martin Reichard
In some taxa, males perform multiple ejaculations, which may function in sperm competition or in maintaining a baseline density of spermatozoa in the female reproductive tract to ensure fertilization, a process that has been termed ‘topping up’. We investigated the function of multiple ejaculations in two species of bitterling, the European bitterling (Rhodeus amarus) and Chinese rose bitterling (Rhodeus ocellatus). Bitterling oviposit in living freshwater mussels, with fertilization taking place within the mussel gill cavity....

Data from: Can newts cope with the heat? Disparate thermoregulatory strategies of two sympatric species in water

Monika Balogová & Lumír Gvoždík
Many ectotherms effectively reduce their exposure to low or high environmental temperatures using behavioral thermoregulation. In terrestrial ectotherms, thermoregulatory strategies range from accurate thermoregulation to thermoconformity according to the costs and limits of thermoregulation, while in aquatic taxa the quantification of behavioral thermoregulation have received limited attention. We examined thermoregulation in two sympatric newt species, Ichthyosaura alpestris and Lissotriton vulgaris, exposed to elevated water temperatures under semi-natural conditions. According to a recent theory, we predicted...

Data from: Parentage analysis of Ansell's mole-rat family groups indicates a high reproductive skew despite relatively relaxed ecological constraints on dispersal

Hana Patzenhauerová, Jan Šklíba, Josef Bryja & Radim Šumbera
To better understand evolutionary pathways leading to eusociality, interspecific comparisons are needed, which would use a common axis, such as that of reproductive skew, to array species. African mole-rats (Bathyergidae, Rodentia) provide an outstanding model of social evolution because of a wide range of social organizations within a single family; however, their reproductive skew is difficult to estimate, due to their cryptic lifestyle. A maximum skew could theoretically be reached in groups where reproduction is...

Data from: Strong population genetic structuring in an annual fish, Nothobranchius furzeri, suggests multiple savannah refugia in southern Mozambique

Veronika Bartáková, Martin Reichard, Karel Janko, Matej Polačik, Radim Blažek, Kathrin Reichwald, Alessandro Cellerino & Josef Bryja
Background: Intraspecific genetic variation of African fauna has been signific antly affected by pronounced climatic fluctuations in Plio-Pleistocene, but, with the exception of large mammals, very limited empirical data on diversity of natural populations are available for savanna-dwelling animals. Nothobranchius furzeri is an annual fish from south-eastern Africa, inhabiting discrete temporary savannah pools outside main river alluvia. Their dispersal is limited and population processes affecting its genetic structure are likely a combination of those affecting...

Data from: Alternative intrapopulation life history strategies and their trade-offs in an African annual fish

Matej Polačik, Radim Blažek, Radomil Řežucha, Milan Vrtílek, Eva Terzibasi-Tozzini & Martin Reichard
In ephemeral habitats, the same genotypes cope with unpredictable environmental conditions, favouring the evolution of developmental plasticity and alternative life-history strategies (ALHS). We tested the existence of intrapopulation ALHS in an annual killifish, Nothobranchius furzeri, inhabiting temporary pools. The pools are either primary (persisting throughout the whole rainy season) or secondary (refilled after desiccation of the initial pool), representing alternative niches. The unpredictable conditions led to the evolution of reproductive bet-hedging with asynchronous embryonic development....

Data from: Phylogeographic analysis reveals northerly refugia for the riverine amphibian Triturus dobrogicus (Caudata: Salamandridae)

Judit Vörös, Peter Mikulíček, Ágnes Major, Ernesto Recuero & Jan W. Arntzen
We investigated the recent evolutionary history of the Danube crested newt, Triturus dobrogicus through reconstructions of: (1) the number and position of refugia at the last glacial maximum, (2) the role of major central European rivers in pattern of post-glacial dispersal, and (3) the present-day distribution pattern. We analysed sequences of mitochondrial DNA (ND2, 1065 bp) and six microsatellite loci in 363 T. dobrogicus individuals from 58 populations covering the range of the species. Our...

Data from: Across a migratory divide: divergent migration directions and non-breeding grounds of Eurasian reed warblers revealed by geolocators and stable isotopes

Petr Procházka, Vojtěch Brlík, Elizabeth Yohannes, Bert Meister, Jürgen Auerswald, Mihaela Ilieva & Steffen Hahn
Migratory divides represent narrow zones of overlap between parapatric populations with distinct migration directions and, consequently, expected divergent non-breeding distributions. The composition of the mixed population at a migratory divide and the corresponding non-breeding ranges remain, however, unknown for many Palaearctic-African migrants. Here, we used light-level geolocation to track migration direction and non-breeding grounds of Eurasian reed warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) from three breeding populations across the species’ migratory divide. Moreover, by using feathers grown at...

Data from: Influence of interspecific competitors on behavioral thermoregulation: developmental or acute plasticity?

Barbora Winterová & Lumír Gvoždík
Many ectotherms reduce their exposure to changing thermal conditions using behavioral thermoregulation. The effectiveness of behavioral thermoregulation in maintaining ectotherm body temperatures within the target range is influenced not only by environmental (operative) temperatures but also by the presence of other con- and heterospecific individuals. How species’ interactions affect behavioral thermoregulation is largely unknown. Theory predicts that species’ interactions could affect the plasticity of behavioral thermoregulation in two ways, i.e. by developmental plasticity of a...

Data from: Idiosyncratic responses to climate-driven forest fragmentation and marine incursions in reed frogs from Central Africa and the Gulf of Guinea Islands

Rayna C. Bell, Juan L. Parra, Gabriel Badjedjea, Michael F. Barej, David C. Blackburn, Marius Burger, Alan Channing, J. Maximilian Dehling, Eli Greenbaum, Václav Gvoždík, Jos Kielgast, Chifundera Kusamba, Stefan Lötters, Patrick J. McLaughlin, Zoltán T. Nagy, Mark-Oliver Rödel, Daniel M. Portik, Bryan L. Stuart, Jeremy VanDerWal, Ange-Ghislain Zassi Boulou & Kelly R. Zamudio
Organismal traits interact with environmental variation to mediate how species respond to shared landscapes. Thus, differences in traits related to dispersal ability or physiological tolerance may result in phylogeographic discordance among co-distributed taxa, even when they are responding to common barriers. We quantified climatic suitability and stability, and phylogeographic divergence within three reed frog species complexes across the Guineo-Congolian forests and Gulf of Guinea archipelago of Central Africa to investigate how they responded to a...

Data from: Sperm head abnormalities are associated with excessive omega-6 fatty acids in two finch species feeding on sunflower seeds

Hanna Nyborg Støstad, Melissah Rowe, Arild Johnsen, Oldřich Tomášek, Tomáš Albrecht & Jan Terje Lifjeld
In a rapidly changing world, it is important to understand how urban environments impact wildlife. For example, supplementary feeding of birds, though well‐intended, might have unexpected negative effects on the health of individual animals. Sunflower seeds are commonly provided in garden bird feeders, but they contain high levels of linoleic acid (LA), an omega‐6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA). Omega‐6 PUFAs are associated with increased oxidative stress, which can damage cell membranes, and in particular sperm...

Data from: A skull might lie: modelling ancestral ranges and diet from genes and shape of tree squirrels

Patrícia Pečnerová, Jiří C. Moravec & Natália Martínková
Tropical forests of Central and South America represent hotspots of biological diversity. Tree squirrels of the tribe Sciurini are an excellent model system for the study of tropical biodiversity as these squirrels disperse exceptional distances, and after colonizing the tropics of the Central and South America, they have diversified rapidly. Here, we compare signals from DNA sequences with morphological signals using pictures of skulls and computational simulations. Phylogenetic analyses reveal step-wise geographic divergence across the...

Data from: Lessons learned from microsatellite development for non-model organisms using 454 pyrosequencing

Corine Schoebel, Sabine Brodbeck, Dominique Buehler, Carolina Cornejo, Jyoti Gajurel, Hanna Hartikainen, Daniela Keller, Marie Leys, Štěpánka Říčanová, Gernot Segelbacher, Silke Werth, Daniela Csencsics & C. N. Schoebel
Microsatellites, also known as simple sequence repeats (SSRs), are among the most commonly used marker types in evolutionary and ecological studies. Next Generation Sequencing techniques such as 454 pyrosequencing allow the rapid development of microsatellite markers in nonmodel organisms. 454 pyrosequencing is a straightforward approach to develop a high number of microsatellite markers. Therefore, developing microsatellites using 454 pyrosequencing has become the method of choice for marker development. Here, we describe a user friendly way...

Data from: Gut microbiome composition and metabolomic profiles of wild western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) reflect host ecology

Andres Gomez, Klara Petrzelkova, Carl J. Yeoman, Klara Vlckova, Jakub Mrázek, Ingrid Koppova, Franck Carbonero, Alexander Ulanov, David Modry, Angelique Todd, Manolito Torralba, Karen Nelson, H. Rex Gaskins, Brenda Wilson, Rebecca M. Stumpf, Bryan A. White, Steven R. Leigh & Karen E. Nelson
The metabolic activities of gut microbes significantly influence host physiology; thus, characterizing the forces that modulate this micro-ecosystem is key to understanding mammalian biology and fitness. To investigate the gut microbiome of wild primates and determine how these microbial communities respond to the host's external environment, we characterized faecal bacterial communities and, for the first time, gut metabolomes of four wild lowland gorilla groups in the Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas, Central African Republic. Results show that...

Data from: Divergent evolutionary processes associated with colonization of offshore islands

Natália Martínková, Ross Barnett, Thomas Cucchi, Rahel Struchen, Marine Pascal, Michel Pascal, Martin C. Fischer, Thomas Higham, Selina Brace, Simon Y. W. Ho, Jean-Pierre Quéré, Paul O'Higgins, Laurent Excoffier, Gerald Heckel, A. Rus Hoelzel, Keith M. Dobney & Jeremy B. Searle
Oceanic islands have been a test ground for evolutionary theory, but here, we focus on the possibilities for evolutionary study created by offshore islands. These can be colonized through various means and by a wide range of species, including those with low dispersal capabilities. We use morphology, modern and ancient sequences of cytochrome b (cytb) and microsatellite genotypes to examine colonization history and evolutionary change associated with occupation of the Orkney archipelago by the common...

Annual killifish embryo ecology

Matej Polačik, Milan Vrtilek, Martin Reichard, Jakub Žák, Radim BLažek & Jason Podrabsky
Embryo-environment interactions are of paramount importance during the development of all organisms, and impacts during this period can echo far into later stages of ontogeny. African annual fish of the genus Nothobranchius live in temporary pools and their eggs survive the dry season in the dry bottom substrate of the pools by entering a facultative developmental arrest termed diapause. Uniquely among animals, the embryos (encased in eggs) may enter diapause at three different developmental stages....

Comparative analysis of passerine feather traits: data and script

Tomas Albrecht & Krystof Horak
Tropical bird species are characterised by a comparatively slow pace of life, being predictably different from their temperate zone counterparts in their investments in growth, survival and reproduction. In birds, the development of functional plumage is often considered energetically demanding investment, with consequences on individual fitness and survival. However, current knowledge of interspecific variation in feather growth patterns is mostly based on species of the northern temperate zone. We evaluated patterns in tail feather growth...

Data from: Evaluation of two approaches to genotyping MHC class I in a passerine – CE-SSCP and 454 pyrosequencing

Marta Promerová, Wiesław Babik, Josef Bryja, Tomáš Albrecht, Michał Stuglik & Jacek Radwan
Genes of the highly dynamic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are directly linked to individual fitness and are of high interest in evolutionary ecology and conservation genetics. Gene duplication and positive selection usually lead to high levels of polymorphism in the MHC region, making genotyping of MHC a challenging task. Here, we compare the performance of two methods for MHC class I genotyping in a passerine with highly duplicated MHC class I genes: capillary electrophoresis single...

Data from: Reinforcement selection acting on the European house mouse hybrid zone

Barbora Vošlajerová Bimová, Miloš Macholán, Stuart J E Baird, Pavel Munclinger, Petra Dufková, Christina M Laukaitis, Robert C Karn, Kenneth Luzynski, Priscilla K Tucker & Jaroslav Piálek
Behavioural isolation may lead to complete speciation when partial postzygotic isolation acts in the presence of divergent specific mate recognition systems. These conditions exist where Mus musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus come into contact and hybridize. We studied two mate recognition signal systems, based on urinary and salivary proteins, across a Central European portion of the mouse hybrid zone. Introgression of the genomic regions responsible for these signals: the major urinary proteins (MUPs) and...

Data from: No evidence for host specialization or host-race formation in the European bitterling (Rhodeus amarus), a fish that parasitizes freshwater mussels

Martin Reichard, Josef Bryja, Matej Polačik & Carl Smith
Coevolutionary relationships between parasites and hosts can elevate the rate of evolutionary changes due to reciprocal adaptations between coevolving partners. Such relationships can result in the evolution of host specificity. Recent methodological advances have permitted the recognition of cryptic lineages, with important consequences for our understanding of biological diversity. We used the European bitterling (Rhodeus amarus), a freshwater fish that parasitizes unionid mussels, to investigate host specialization across regions of recent and ancient sympatry between...

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