4 Works

Data from: Invasion genetics of the introduced black rat (Rattus rattus) in Senegal, West Africa

Adam Konečný, Arnaud Estoup, Jean-Marc Duplantier, Josef Bryja, Khalilou Ba, Maxime Galan, Caroline Tatard & Jean-François Cosson
An understanding of the evolutionary history and dynamics of invasive species is required for the construction of predictive models of future spread, and the design of biological management measures. The black rat (Rattus rattus) is a major vertebrate invader with a worldwide distribution. Despite the severe ecological, economic and health impacts of this species, its evolutionary history has been little studied. We carried out extensive specimen sampling in Senegal, West Africa, and used microsatellite markers...

Data from: An invasive species reverses the roles in a host-parasite relationship between bitterling fish and unionid mussels

Martin Reichard, Milan Vrtilek, Karel Douda & Carl Smith
The impact of multiple invading species can be magnified due to mutual facilitation, termed “invasional meltdown”, but invasive species can also be adversely affected by their interactions with other invaders. Using a unique reciprocal host-parasite relationship between a bitterling fish, Rhodeus amarus, and unionid mussels, we show that an invasive mussel reverses the roles in the relationship. Bitterling lay their eggs into mussel gills, and mussel larvae parasitize fish. Bitterling recently colonized Europe and parasitize...

Data from: Does developmental acclimatization reduce the susceptibility to predation in newt larvae?

Radovan Smolinsky & Lumir Gvozdik
Many organisms respond to the heterogeneity of abiotic environmental conditions by plastic modifications of their phenotypes (acclimation or acclimatization). Despite considerable research efforts in this area, the beneficial (adaptive) effect of acclimation or acclimatization is still debated. We examined whether development of newt larvae (Ichthyosaura alpestris) in different natural light and thermal conditions subsequently altered their susceptibility to predation in sun-exposed versus shaded tanks in nature. During predation trials in various light and temperature conditions,...

Data from: Lessons learned from microsatellite development for non-model organisms using 454 pyrosequencing

Corine Schoebel, Sabine Brodbeck, Dominique Buehler, Carolina Cornejo, Jyoti Gajurel, Hanna Hartikainen, Daniela Keller, Marie Leys, Štěpánka Říčanová, Gernot Segelbacher, Silke Werth, Daniela Csencsics & C. N. Schoebel
Microsatellites, also known as simple sequence repeats (SSRs), are among the most commonly used marker types in evolutionary and ecological studies. Next Generation Sequencing techniques such as 454 pyrosequencing allow the rapid development of microsatellite markers in nonmodel organisms. 454 pyrosequencing is a straightforward approach to develop a high number of microsatellite markers. Therefore, developing microsatellites using 454 pyrosequencing has become the method of choice for marker development. Here, we describe a user friendly way...

Registration Year

  • 2012
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Institute of Vertebrate Biology
    4
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    1
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    1
  • University of Freiburg
    1
  • University of St Andrews
    1
  • Natural History Museum
    1
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    1
  • T. G. Masaryk Water Research Institute
    1
  • Centre de Biologie et de Gestion des Populations
    1