592 Works

Fertilizer quantity and type alter mycorrhizae-conferred growth and resistance to herbivores

Zoe Getman-Pickering, George Stack & Jennifer Thaler
1. Plants face a constant struggle to acquire nutrients and defend themselves against herbivores. Mycorrhizae are fungal mutualists that provide nutrients that can increase plant growth and alter resistance to herbivores. The beneficial effects of mycorrhizae for nutrient acquisition can depend on the quantity and type of soil nutrients available, with plants usually benefiting more in terms of growth from mycorrhizae when nutrients are limited. However, it is unclear how the addition of different nutrients...

Data from: User experience methods and maturity in academic libraries

Scott W. H. Young, Zoe Chao & Adam Chandler
This article presents a mixed-methods study of the methods and maturity of user experience (UX) practice in academic libraries. The authors apply qualitative content analysis and quantitative statistical analysis to a research dataset derived from a survey of UX practitioners. Results reveal the type and extent of UX methods currently in use by practitioners in academic libraries. Themes extracted from the survey responses also reveal a set of factors that influence the development of UX...

Migratory lineages rapidly evolve larger body sizes than non-migratory relatives in ray-finned fishes

Michael Burns
Migratory animals respond to environmental heterogeneity by predictably moving long distances in their lifetime. Migration has evolved repeatedly in animals, and many adaptations are found across the tree of life that increase migration efficiency. Life history theory predicts that migratory species should evolve a larger body size than non-migratory species and some empirical studies have shown this pattern. A recent study analyzed the evolution of body size between diadromous and non-diadromous shads, herrings, anchovies and...

Increasing agricultural habitat reduces solitary bee offspring number and weight in apple orchards through reduced floral diet diversity and increased fungicide risk

Mary Centrella, Laura Russo, Natalia Moreno-Ramirez, Brian Eitzer, Maria Van Dyke, Bryan Danforth & Katja Poveda
1. Threats to bee pollinators such as land use change, high pesticide risk, and reduced floral diet diversity are usually assessed independently, even though they often co-occur to impact bees in agroecosystems. 2. We established populations of the non-native mason bee O. cornifrons at 17 NY apple orchards varying in proportion of surrounding agriculture and measured floral diet diversity and pesticide risk levels in the pollen provisions they produced. We used path analysis to test...

Data from: Osteosarcopenia in reproductive-aged women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a multicenter case-control study

Maryam Kazemi, Brittany Jarrett, Stephen Parry, Anna Thalacker-Mercer, Kathleen Hoeger & Steven Spandorfer
Context: Osteosarcopenia (loss of skeletal muscle and bone mass and/or function usually associated with aging) shares pathophysiological mechanisms with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, the relationship between osteosarcopenia and PCOS remains unclear. Objective: We evaluated skeletal muscle index% (SMI%=[appendicular muscle mass/weight {kg}]×100) and bone mineral density (BMD) in PCOS (hyperandrogenism+oligoamenorrhea), and contrasted these musculoskeletal markers against 3 reproductive phenotypes: (1) HA (hyperandrogenism+eumenorrhea); (2) OA (normoandrogenic+oligoamenorrhea) and, (3) controls (normoandrogenic+eumenorrhea). Endocrine predictors of SMI% and BMD...

Lost and found: frogs in a biodiversity hotspot rediscovered with environmental DNA

Carla Martins Lopes, Délio Baêta, Alice Valentini, Mariana Lúcio Lyra, Ariadne Fares Sabbag, João Luiz Gasparini, Tony Dejean, Célio Fernando Baptista Haddad & Kelly Raquel Zamudio
Declines and extinctions are increasing globally and challenging conservationists to keep pace with biodiversity monitoring. Organisms leave DNA traces in the environment and this free DNA in soil, water, and air is referred to as environmental DNA (eDNA). The analysis of eDNA is a highly sensitive method with the potential to rapidly assess local diversity and the status of threatened species. We searched for DNA traces of 30 target amphibian species of conservation concern, at...

Pigmentation Genes Show Evidence of Repeated Divergence and Multiple Bouts of Introgression in Setophaga Warblers

David Toews, Marcella Baiz, Andrew Wood, Alan Brelsford & Irby Lovette
Species radiations have long served as model systems in evolutionary biology. However, it has only recently become possible to study the genetic bases of the traits responsible for diversification, and only in a small number of model systems. Here we use genomes of 36 species of North, Central, and South American warblers to highlight the role of pigmentation genes—involved in melanin and carotenoid processing—in the diversification of this group. We show that agouti signaling protein...

Personality-specific carry-over effects on breeding

Steph Harris, Stephanie M Harris, Sebastien Descamps, Lynne Sneddon, Milena Cairo, Philip Bertrand & Samantha Patrick
Carry-over effects describe the phenomenon whereby an animal’s previous conditions influence its subsequent performance. Carry-over effects are unlikely to affect individuals uniformly, but the factors modulating their strength are poorly known. Variation in the strength of carry-over effects may reflect individual differences in pace-of-life: slow-paced, shyly behaved individuals are thought to favour allocation to self-maintenance over current reproduction, compared to their fast-paced, boldly behaved conspecifics (the pace-of-life syndrome hypothesis). Therefore, detectable carry-over effects on breeding...

High genomic diversity in the bank vole at the northern apex of a range expansion: the role of multiple colonizations and end-glacial refugia

Silvia Marková, Michaela Horníková, Hayley Lanier, Heikki Henttonen, Jeremy Searle, Lawrence Weider & Petr Kotlík
The history of repeated northern glacial cycling and southern climatic stability has long dominated explanations for how genetic diversity is distributed within temperate species in Eurasia and North America. However, growing evidence indicates the importance of cryptic refugia for northern colonization dynamics. An excellent geographic region to assess this is Fennoscandia, where recolonization at the end of the last glaciation was restricted to specific routes and temporal windows. We used genomic data to analyze genetic...

The island biogeography of the eBird citizen-science program

Frank La Sorte & Marius Somveille
Aim: Island biotas face an array of unique challenges under global change. Monitoring and research efforts, however, have been hindered by the large number of islands, their broad distribution and geographic isolation. Global citizen-science initiatives have the potential to address these deficiencies. Here, we determine how the eBird citizen-science program is currently sampling island bird assemblages annually and how these patterns are developing over time. Location: Global. Taxa: Birds. Methods: We compiled occurrence information of...

Data from: Ecological and social drivers of neighbor recognition and the dear enemy effect in a poison frog

James Tumulty & Mark Bee
Navigating social relationships frequently rests on the ability to recognize familiar individuals using phenotypic characteristics. Across diverse taxa, animals vary in their capacities for social recognition but the ecological and social sources of selection for recognition are often unclear. In a comparative study of two closely related species of poison frogs, we identified a species difference in social recognition of territory neighbors and investigated potential sources of selection underlying this difference. In response to acoustic...

An atypical mating system in a neotropical manakin

Milene G. Gaiotti, Michael Webster & Regina Macedo
Most of the diversity of in the mating systems of birds and other animals come at higher taxonomic levels, such as across orders. Although divergent selective pressures should lead to animal mating systems that diverge sharply from those of close relatives, opportunities to examine the importance of such processes are scarce. We addressed this issue using the Araripe manakin (Antilophia bokermanni), a species endemic to a forest enclave surrounded by xeric shrublands in Brazil. Most...

Evolution of a multifunctional trait: shared effects of foraging ecology and thermoregulation on beak morphology, with consequences for song evolution

Nicholas R. Friedman, Eliot T. Miller, Jason R. Ball, Haruka Kasuga, Vladimír Remeš & Evan P. Economo
While morphological traits are often associated with multiple functions, it remains unclear how evolution balances the selective effects of different functions. Birds' beaks function in foraging, but also in thermoregulating and singing, among other behaviours. Studies of beak evolution abound, however most focus on a single function. Thus, we quantified relative contributions of different functions over an evolutionary time scale. We measured beak shape using geometric morphometrics and compared this trait to foraging behaviour, climatic...

Data from: Social context alters spatial memory performance in free-living male prairie voles

Alexander Ophir
Spatial memory is crucial for mating success because it enables males to locate potential mates and potential competitors in space. Intraspecific competition and its varying intensity under certain conditions are potentially important for shaping spatial memory. For example, spatial memory could enable males to know where competitors are (contest competition), it could help males find mating partners (scramble competition), or both. We manipulated the intensity of intraspecific competition in two distinct contexts by altering the...

Leaf data of 101 species, varieties, forms, and cultivars of bamboo

Shuyan Lin, Karl Niklas, Yawen Wan, Dirk Hölscher, Cang Hui, Yulong Ding & Peijian Shi
The data include four comma-delimited (CSV) files and one word document. data1.csv file saves the raw data (including blade fresh mass, dry mass, area, length, width, perimeter and other measures) of 10045 leaves from 101 species, varieties, forms, and cultivars of bamboo; data2.csv file saves the results of the leaf dry mass per unit area (g/m2) comparison among 101 data sets; data3.csv file saves the results of the quotient of blade width to length comparison...

Data from: Attack and aggregation of a major squash pest: parsing the role of plant chemistry and beetle pheromones across spatial scales

Lauren Brzozowski, Jeffrey Gardner, Michael Hoffmann, André Kessler, Anurag Agrawal & Michael Mazourek
1. Successful management of insect crop pests requires an understanding of the cues and spatial scales at which they function to affect rates of attack of preferred and non-preferred host plants. A long-standing conceptual framework in insect-plant ecology posits that there is hierarchical structure spanning host location, acceptance, and attack that could be exploited for integrated pest management. 2. We investigated how plant- and insect-derived chemical cues affect successive decisions of host choice in aggregating...

Data from: Negative effects of pesticides on wild bee communities can be buffered by landscape context

Mia G. Park, Eleanor J. Blitzer, Jason Gibbs, John E. Losey & Bryan N. Danforth
Wild bee communities provide underappreciated but critical agricultural pollination services. Given predicted global shortages in pollination services, managing agroecosystems to support thriving wild bee communities is, therefore, central to ensuring sustainable food production. Benefits of natural (including semi-natural) habitat for wild bee abundance and diversity on farms are well documented. By contrast, few studies have examined toxicity of pesticides on wild bees, let alone effects of farm-level pesticide exposure on entire bee communities. Whether beneficial...

Data from: Population growth and sequestration of plant toxins along a gradient of specialization in four aphid species on the common milkweed Asclepias syriaca

Tobias Züst & Anurag A. Agrawal
Dietary specialization in insect herbivores has long been hypothesized to predict tolerance of plant defences, with more specialized herbivores being highly tolerant of and sometimes sequestering plant secondary compounds. Plant variation in secondary compounds should thus play an important and predictable role in shaping the performance and distribution of insect communities. We compared the performance of four naturally co-occurring aphid species on twenty genotypes of the common milkweed Asclepias syriaca. Genotypes of milkweed consistently differed...

Data from: Genetic structure of populations of whale sharks among ocean basins and evidence for their historic rise and recent decline

Thomas M. Vignaud, Jeffrey A. Maynard, Raphael Leblois, Mark G. Meekan, Ricardo Vázquez-Juárez, Dení Ramírez-Macías, Simon J. Pierce, David Rowat, Michael L. Berumen, Champak Beeravolu, Sandra Baksay & Serge Planes
This study presents genetic evidence that whale sharks, Rhincodon typus, are comprised of at least two populations that rarely mix and is the first to document a population expansion. Relatively high genetic structure is found when comparing sharks from the Gulf of Mexico with sharks from the Indo-Pacific. If mixing occurs between the Indian and Atlantic Oceans, it is not sufficient to counter genetic drift. This suggests whale sharks are not all part of a...

Data from: Seascape continuity plays an important role in determining patterns of spatial genetic structure in a coral reef fish

Cassidy C. D'Aloia, Steven M. Bogdanowicz, Richard G. Harrison & Peter M. Buston
Detecting patterns of spatial genetic structure (SGS) can help identify intrinsic and extrinsic barriers to gene flow within metapopulations. For marine organisms such as coral reef fishes, identifying these barriers is critical to predicting evolutionary dynamics and demarcating evolutionarily significant units for conservation. In this study, we adopted an alternative hypothesis-testing framework to identify the patterns and predictors of SGS in the Caribbean reef fish Elacatinus lori. First, genetic structure was estimated using nuclear microsatellites...

Data from: Divergence in calls but not songs in the orchard oriole complex: Icterus spurius and I. fuertesi

Rachel J. Sturge, Kevin E. Omland, J. Jordan Price & Bernard Lohr
Birdsong has important functions in attracting and competing for mates, and song characteristics are thought to diverge rapidly during the process of speciation. In contrast, other avian vocalizations that may have non-reproductive functions, such as calls, are thought to be more evolutionarily conserved and may diverge more slowly among taxa. This study examines differences in both male song and an acoustically simpler vocalization, the ‘jeet’ call, between two closely related taxa, Icterus spurius and I....

Data from: Experimental manipulation of floral scent bouquets restructures flower-visitor interactions in the field

Anne-Amélie C. Larue, Robert A. Raguso & Robert R. Junker
1. A common structural feature of natural communities is the non-random distribution of pairwise interactions between organisms of different trophic levels. For plant–animal interactions, it is predicted that both stochastic processes and functional plant traits that facilitate or prevent interactions are responsible for these patterns. 2. However, unbiased manipulative field experiments that rigorously test the effects of individual traits on community structure are lacking. We address this gap by manipulating floral scent bouquets in the...

Data from: Wolbachia infection in a natural parasitoid wasp population

Anne Duplouy, Christelle Couchoux, Ilkka Hanski & Saskya Van Nouhuys
The maternally transmitted bacterium Wolbachia pipientis is well known for spreading and persisting in insect populations through manipulation of the fitness of its host. Here, we identify three new Wolbachia pipientis strains, wHho, wHho2 and wHho3, infecting Hyposoter horticola, a specialist wasp parasitoid of the Glanville fritillary butterfly. The wHho strain (ST435) infects about 50% of the individuals in the Åland islands in Finland, with a different infection rate in the two mitochondrial (COI) haplotypes...

Data from: Population size-structure dependent fitness and ecosystem consequences in Trinidadian guppies

Ronald D. Bassar, , Michael C. Marshall, Steven A. Thomas, Alexander S. Flecker, David N. Reznick & Thomas Heatherly
1. Decades of theory and recent empirical results have shown that evolutionary, population, community and ecosystem properties are the result of feedbacks between ecological and evolutionary processes. The vast majority of theory and empirical research on these eco-evolutionary feedbacks has focused on interactions among population size and mean traits of populations. 2. However, numbers and mean traits represent only a fraction of the possible feedback dimensions. Populations of many organisms consist of different size classes...

Data from: Ecotypes of an ecologically dominant prairie grass (Andropogon gerardii) exhibit genetic divergence across the U.S. Midwest grasslands environmental gradient

Miranda M. Gray, Paul St. Amand, Nora M. Bello, Mary Knapp, Karen A. Garrett, Theodore J. Morgan, Sara G. Baer, Brian R. Maricle, Eduard D. Akhunov, Loretta C. Johnson & Matthew B. Galliart
Big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) is an ecologically dominant grass with wide distribution across the environmental gradient of U.S. Midwest grasslands. This system offers an ideal natural laboratory to study the nature of population divergence and adaptation in spatially varying climates. Objectives were to: (i) characterize neutral genetic diversity and structure within and among three regional ecotypes derived from 11 prairies across the U.S. Midwest environmental gradient, (ii) distinguish between the relative roles of isolation-by-distance (IBD)...

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