41 Works

Data from: Landscape diversity moderates the effects of bee visitation frequency to flowers on crop production.

Jessica D. Petersen & Brian A. Nault
1.Reductions in natural habitat are implicated in declining honey bee Apis mellifera L. and wild bee populations, thereby threatening crop production. This concern has stimulated interest in identifying landscape-level impacts on bee-mediated pollination services, but previous studies have only inferred connections between landscape, bees and yield through generalized linear regressions. 2. We examined landscape impacts on bee-mediated crop yield using both a traditional linear regression approach and conditional process modelling, which combined landscape features, bee...

Data from: The role of cis regulatory evolution in maize domestication

Zachary H. Lemmon, Robert Bukowski, Qi Sun & John F. Doebley
Gene expression differences between divergent lineages caused by modification of cis regulatory elements are thought to be important in evolution. We assayed genome-wide cis and trans regulatory differences between maize and its wild progenitor, teosinte, using deep RNA sequencing in F1 hybrid and parent inbred lines for three tissue types (ear, leaf and stem). Pervasive regulatory variation was observed with approximately 70% of ~17,000 genes showing evidence of regulatory divergence between maize and teosinte. However,...

Data from: Context-dependent reproductive isolation mediated by floral scent and color

Mascha Bischoff, Robert A. Raguso, Andreas Jürgens & Diane R. Campbell
Reproductive isolation due to pollinator behavior is considered a key mode of speciation in flowering plants. Although floral scent is thought to mediate pollinator behavior, little is known about its effects on pollinator attraction and floral visitation in the wild. We used field experiments with wild hawkmoths and laboratory experiments with naïve hawkmoths to investigate attraction to and probing of flowers in response to indole, a volatile emitted by Ipomopsis tenuituba but not its close...

Data from: Historically browsed jewelweed populations exhibit greater tolerance to deer herbivory than historically protected populations

Laura J. Martin, Anurag A. Agrawal & Clifford E. Kraft
Browsing by overabundant white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) has altered ecological relationships in forest communities across eastern North America. Recent but limited work suggests that deer browsing also selects for particular plant defensive traits. We hypothesized that browsing by deer has imposed selection on defensive traits in an annual native wildflower, orange jewelweed (Impatiens capensis). To test this hypothesis, we collected individuals from 26 natural populations across a 5000 km2 area in New York State, USA....

Data from: Earthworm invasion, white-tailed deer and seedling establishment in deciduous forests of northeastern North America

Bernd Blossey & Annise Dobson
1. Earthworm invasions and high deer populations are among many stressors threatening long-term population viability of forest understorey plants in northeastern North America. Stressor effects are typically tested one at a time, however, stressors often co-occur, and plants respond to effects of multiple stressors simultaneously. 2. We used a factorial design to test independent and combined effects of non-native earthworms and native white-tailed deer on survival of seedling transplants of 15 native understorey plants in...

Data from: Defense mutualisms enhance plant diversification

Marjorie G. Weber & Anurag A. Agrawal
The ability of plants to form mutualistic relationships with animal defenders has long been suspected to influence their evolutionary success, both by decreasing extinction risk and by increasing opportunity for speciation through an expanded realized niche. Nonetheless, the hypothesis that defense mutualisms consistently enhance plant diversification across lineages has not been well tested due to a lack of phenotypic and phylogenetic information. Using a global analysis, we show that the >100 vascular plant families in...

Data from: Eyespots deflect predator attack increasing fitness and promoting the evolution of phenotypic plasticity

Kathleen L. Prudic, Andrew M. Stoehr, Bethany R. Wasik & Antónia Monteiro
Some eyespots are thought to deflect attack away from the vulnerable body, yet there is limited empirical evidence for this function and its adaptive advantage. Here, we demonstrate the conspicuous ventral hindwing eyespots found on Bicyclus anynana butterflies protect against invertebrate predators, specifically praying mantids. Wet season (WS) butterflies with larger, brighter eyespots were easier for mantids to detect, but more difficult to capture compared to dry season (DS) butterflies with small, dull eyespots. Mantids...

Data from: Characterizing male-female interactions using natural genetic variation in Drosophila melanogaster

Michael Reinhart, Tara Carney, Andrew G. Clark & Anthony C. Fiumera
Drosophila melanogaster females commonly mate with multiple males establishing the opportunity for pre- and postcopulatory sexual selection. Traits impacting sexual selection can be affected by a complex interplay of the genotypes of the competing males, the genotype of the female, and compatibilities between the males and females. We scored males from 96 2nd and 94 3rd chromosome substitution lines for traits affecting reproductive success when mated with females from 3 different genetic backgrounds. The traits...

Data from: Warning signals are seductive: relative contributions of color and pattern to predator avoidance and mate attraction in Heliconius butterflies

Susan D. Finkbeiner, Adriana D. Briscoe & Robert D. Reed
Visual signaling in animals can serve many uses, including predator deterrence and mate attraction. In many cases, signals used to advertise unprofitability to predators are also used for intraspecific communication. Although aposematism and mate choice are significant forces driving the evolution of many animal phenotypes, the interplay between relevant visual signals remains little explored. Here, we address this question in the aposematic passion-vine butterfly Heliconius erato by using color- and pattern-manipulated models to test the...

Data from: A phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia: an RNA-seq approach

Vanessa L. González, Sónia C. S. Andrade, Rüdiger Bieler, Timothy M. Collins, Casey W. Dunn, Paula M. Mikkelsen, John D. Taylor, Gonzalo Giribet & V. L. Gonzalez
Bivalves are an ancient and ubiquitous group of aquatic invertebrates with an estimated 10 000–20 000 living species. They are economically significant as a human food source, and ecologically important given their biomass and effects on communities. Their phylogenetic relationships have been studied for decades, and their unparalleled fossil record extends from the Cambrian to the Recent. Nevertheless, a robustly supported phylogeny of the deepest nodes, needed to fully exploit the bivalves as a model...

Data from: Complete dosage compensation and sex-biased gene expression in the moth Manduca sexta

Gilbert Smith, Yun-Ru Chen, Gary W. Bissard & Adriana D. Briscoe
Sex chromosome dosage compensation balances homogametic sex chromosome expression with autosomal expression in the heterogametic sex, leading to sex chromosome expression parity between the sexes. If compensation is incomplete this can lead to expression imbalance and sex-biased gene expression. Recent work has uncovered an intriguing and variable pattern of dosage compensation across species that includes a lack of complete dosage compensation in ZW species compared to XY species. This has led to the hypothesis that...

Data from: New insights into New World biogeography: an integrated view from the phylogeny of blackbirds, cardinals, sparrows, tanagers, warblers, and allies

F. Keith Barker, Kevin J. Burns, John Klicka, Scott M. Lanyon & Irby J. Lovette
Understanding the biogeographic origins and temporal sequencing of groups within a region or of lineages within an ecosystem can yield important insights into evolutionary dynamics and ecological processes. Fifty years ago, Ernst Mayr generated comprehensive—if limited—inferences about the origins of the New World avifaunas, including the importance of pre-Isthmian dispersal between North and South America. Since then, methodological advances have improved our ability to address many of the same questions, but the phylogenies upon which...

Data from: The generification of the fossil record

Jonathan R. Hendricks, Erin E. Saupe, Corinne E. Myers, Elizabeth J. Hermsen & Warren D. Allmon
Many modern paleobiological analyses are conducted at the generic level, a practice predicated on the validity of genera as meaningful proxies for species. Uncritical application of genera in such analyses, however, has led, perhaps inadvertently, to the unjustified reification of genera in an evolutionary context. While the utility of genera as proxies for species in evolutionary studies should be evaluated as an empirical issue, in practice it is increasingly assumed (rather than demonstrated) that genera...

Data from: An experimental analysis of the heritability of variation in glucocorticoid concentrations in a wild avian population

Brittany R. Jenkins, Maren N. Vitousek, Joanna K. Hubbard & Rebecca J. Safran
Glucocorticoid hormones (CORT) are predicted to promote adaptation to variable environments, yet little is known about the potential for CORT secretion patterns to respond to selection in free-living populations. We assessed the heritable variation underlying differences in hormonal phenotypes using a cross-foster experimental design with nestling North American barn swallows (Hirundo rustica erythrogaster). Using a bivariate animal model, we partitioned variance in baseline and stress-induced CORT concentrations into their additive genetic and rearing environment components...

Data from: Meta-analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana phospho-proteomics data reveals compartmentalization of phosphorylation motifs

Klaas J. Van Wijk, Giulia Friso, Dirk Walther & Waltraud X. Schulze
Protein (de)phosphorylation plays an important role in plants. To provide a robust foundation for subcellular phosphorylation signaling network analysis and kinase-substrate relationships, we performed a meta-analysis of 27 published and unpublished in-house mass spectrometry–based phospho-proteome data sets for Arabidopsis thaliana covering a range of processes, (non)photosynthetic tissue types, and cell cultures. This resulted in an assembly of 60,366 phospho-peptides matching to 8141 nonredundant proteins. Filtering the data for quality and consistency generated a set of...

Data from: Genetic diversity among INERA maize inbred lines with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and their relationship with CIMMYT, IITA, and temperate lines

Abdalla Dao, Jacob Sanou, Sharon E. Mitchell, Gracen Vernon & Eric Y. Danquah
Background: Genetic diversity provides the capacity for plants to meet changing environments. It is fundamentally important in crop improvement. Fifty-nine local maize lines developed at INERA and 41 exotic (temperate and tropical) inbred lines were characterized using 1057 SNP markers to (1) analyse the genetic diversity in a diverse set of maize inbred lines; (2) determine the level of genetic diversity in INERA inbred lines and patterns of relationships of these inbred lines developed from...

Data from: Constructing predictive models of human running

Horst-Moritz Maus, Shai Revzen, John Guckenheimer, Christian Ludwig, Johann Reger & Andre Seyfarth
Running is an essential mode of human locomotion, during which ballistic aerial phases alternate with phases when a single foot contacts the ground. The spring-loaded inverted pendulum (SLIP) provides a starting point for modelling running, and generates ground reaction forces that resemble those of the centre of mass (CoM) of a human runner. Here, we show that while SLIP reproduces within-step kinematics of the CoM in three dimensions, it fails to reproduce stability and predict...

Data from: Genotype and diet shape resistance and tolerance across distinct phases of bacterial infection

Virginia M. Howick & Brian P. Lazzaro
Background: Host defense against pathogenic infection is composed of resistance and tolerance. Resistance is the ability of the host to limit a pathogen burden, whereas tolerance is the ability to limit the deleterious effects of a given pathogen burden. This distinction recognizes that the fittest host does not necessarily have the most aggressive immune system, suggesting that host-pathogen co-evolution involves more than an escalating arms race between pathogen virulence factors and host antimicrobial activity. How...

Data from: Demographic history of a recent invasion of house mice on the isolated Island of Gough

Melissa M. Gray, Daniel Wegmann, Ryan J. Haasl, Michael A. White, Sofia I. Gabriel, Jeremy B. Searle, Richard J. Cuthbert, Peter G. Ryan & Bret A. Payseur
Island populations provide natural laboratories for studying key contributors to evolutionary change, including natural selection, population size, and the colonization of new environments. The demographic histories of island populations can be reconstructed from patterns of genetic diversity. House mice (Mus musculus) inhabit islands throughout the globe, making them an attractive system for studying island colonization from a genetic perspective. Gough Island, in the central South Atlantic Ocean, is one of the remotest islands in the...

Data from: Climate, physiological tolerance, and sex-biased dispersal shape genetic structure of Neotropical orchid bees

Margarita M. Lopez-Uribe, Kelly R. Zamudio, Carolina F. Cardoso & Bryan N. Danforth
Understanding the impact of past climatic events on the demographic history of extant species is critical for predicting species’ responses to future climate change. Paleoclimatic instability is a major mechanism of lineage diversification in taxa with low dispersal and small geographic ranges in tropical ecosystems. However, the impact of these climatic events remains questionable for the diversification of species with high levels of gene flow and large geographic distributions. In this study, we investigate the...

Data from: Demographic responses of rare forest plants to multiple stressors: the role of deer, invasive species and nutrients

Andrea Dávalos, Victoria Nuzzo & Bernd Blossey
Forest ecosystems in eastern North America face multiple threats or stressors including plant and animal invasions and increased white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) herbivory. While each stressor may have independent detrimental effects on native biota, stressors often co-occur and are likely to have interactive effects. Despite recognition that concurrent processes drive plant demographic responses, few studies evaluate independent and combined effect of stressors. Using a network of 12 sites that varied in non-native plant cover and...

Data from: Spatial distribution of oak mistletoe as it relates to habits of oak woodland frugivores

Ethan A. Wilson, Patrick J. Sullivan & Janis L. Dickinson
This study addresses the underlying spatial distribution of oak mistletoe, Phoradendron villosum, a hemi-parasitic plant that provides a continuous supply of berries for frugivorous birds overwintering the oak savanna habitat of California's outer coast range. As the winter community of birds consuming oak mistletoe varies from group-living territorial species to birds that roam in flocks, we asked if mistletoe volume was spatially autocorrelated at the scale of persistent territories or whether the patterns predicted by...

Data from: Climate-mediated movement of an avian hybrid zone

Scott A. Taylor, Thomas A. White, Wesley M. Hochachka, Valentina Ferretti, Robert L. Curry & Irby Lovette
The interaction between sibling species that share a zone of contact is a multifaceted relationship affected by climate change. Between sibling species, interactions may occur at whole-organism (direct or indirect competition) or genomic (hybridization and introgression) levels. Tracking hybrid zone movements can provide insights about influences of environmental change on species interactions. Here, we explore the extent and mechanism of movement of the contact zone between black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) and Carolina chickadees (Poecile carolinensis)...

Data from: Allopolyploidy and the evolution of plant virus resistance

John W. Gottula, Ramsey Lewis, Seiya Saito & Marc Fuchs
Background: The relationship between allopolyploidy and plant virus resistance is poorly understood. To determine the relationship of plant evolutionary history and basal virus resistance, a panel of Nicotiana species from diverse geographic regions and ploidy levels was assessed for resistance to non-coevolved viruses from the genus Nepovirus, family Secoviridae. The heritability of resistance was tested in a panel of synthetic allopolyploids. Leaves of different positions on each inoculated plant were tested for virus presence and...

Data from: Spatial and temporal escape from fungal parasitism in natural communities of anciently asexual bdelloid rotifers

Christopher G. Wilson & Paul W. Sherman
Sexual reproduction is costly, but it is nearly ubiquitous among plants and animals, whereas obligately asexual taxa are rare and almost always short-lived. The Red Queen hypothesis proposes that sex overcomes its costs by enabling organisms to keep pace with coevolving parasites and pathogens. If so, the few cases of stable long-term asexuality ought to be found in groups whose coevolutionary interactions with parasites are unusually weak. In theory, antagonistic coevolution will be attenuated if...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    41

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    41

Affiliations

  • Cornell University
    41
  • Harvard University
    3
  • University of California, Irvine
    3
  • Sao Paulo State University
    2
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    2
  • University of California System
    2
  • King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
    2
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • Centre de Biologie et de Gestion des Populations
    2