87 Works

Data from: Dolphins simplify their vocal calls in response to increased ambient noise

Leila Fouda, Jessica E. Wingfield, Amber D. Fandel, Aran Garrod, Kristin B. Hodge, Aaron N. Rice & Helen Bailey
Ocean noise varies spatially and temporally and is driven by natural and anthropogenic processes. Increased ambient noise levels can cause signal masking and communication impairment, affecting fitness and recruitment success. However, the effects of increasing ambient noise levels on marine species, such as marine mammals that primarily rely on sound for communication, are not well understood. We investigated the effects of concurrent ambient noise levels on social whistle calls produced by bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)...

Data from: Lions and leopards coexist without spatial, temporal or demographic effects of interspecific competition

Jennifer R.B. Miller, Ross T. Pitman, Gareth K.H. Mann, Angela K. Fuller, Guy A. Balme, Jennifer R. B. Miller & Gareth K. H. Mann
1. Although interspecific competition plays a principle role in shaping species behaviour and demography, little is known about the population-level outcomes of competition between large carnivores, and the mechanisms that facilitate coexistence. 2. We conducted a multi-landscape analysis of two widely distributed, threatened large carnivore competitors to offer insight into coexistence strategies and assist with species-level conservation. 3. We evaluated how interference competition affects occupancy, temporal activity and population density of a dominant competitor, the...

Data from: You can’t have it all: heritability and constraints of predator-induced developmental plasticity in a Neotropical treefrog

Justin Charles Touchon & Jeanne Marie Robertson
Many organisms have evolved phenotypic plasticity but examples of a heritable genetic basis or genetic constraints for plasticity across environments remain scarce. Tadpoles of the Neotropical treefrog Dendropsophus ebraccatus alter tail coloration and shape differently in response to fish or aquatic insect predators. To assess the genetic basis of plasticity we raised 1020 tadpoles from 17 maternal half-sib pairs (34 unique families) individually with chemical cues of fish or aquatic insects, or with cue-free control...

Data from: Relative selectivity of plant cardenolides for Na+/K+-ATPases from the monarch butterfly and non-resistant insects

Georg Petschenka, Colleen S. Fei, Juan J. Araya, Susanne Schröder, Barbara N. Timmermann & Anurag A. Agrawal
A major prediction of coevolutionary theory is that plants may target particular herbivores with secondary compounds that are selectively defensive. The highly specialized monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) copes well with cardiac glycosides (inhibitors of animal Na+/K+-ATPases) from its milkweed host plants, but selective inhibition of its Na+/K+-ATPase by different compounds has not been previously tested. We applied 17 cardiac glycosides to the D. plexippus-Na+/K+-ATPase and to the more susceptible Na+/K+-ATPases of two non-adapted insects (Euploea...

Data from: Bt eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) in Bangladesh: Fruit production and control of eggplant fruit and shoot borer (Leucinodes orbonalis Guenee), effects on non-target arthropods and economic returns

M.Z.H. Prodhan, M.T Hasan, M.M.I. Chowdhury, Alam , M.L. Rahman, A.K. Azad, M.J. Hossain, Steve E. Naranjo & Anthony M. Shelton
Eggplant or brinjal (Solanum melongena) is a popular vegetable grown throughout Asia where it is attacked by brinjal fruit and shoot borer (BFSB) (Leucinodes orbonalis). Yield losses in Bangladesh have been reported up to 86% and farmers rely primarily on frequent insecticide applications to reduce injury. Bangladesh has developed and released four brinjal varieties producing Cry1Ac (Bt brinjal) and is the first country to do so. We report on the first replicated field trials comparing...

Data from: Soil organic carbon dynamics matching ecological equilibrium theory

Tancredi Caruso, Franciska T. De Vries, Richard D. Bardgett & Johannes Lehmann
The persistence of soil organic carbon (SOC) has traditionally been explained as a combination of recalcitrance properties and stabilization processes, which lead to the formation of complex organic compounds. However, recent conceptual advances and experimental evidence challenge this view. Here, we test these conceptual advances using a dynamic equilibrium theory of SOC founded on classic ecological theory. We postulate that the persistence of SOC is an equilibrium point where SOC losses resulting from continuous decomposition...

Data from: Range-wide genomic data synthesis reveals transatlantic vicariance and secondary contact in Atlantic cod

Robert Fairweather, Ian R. Bradbury, Sarah J. Heylar, Mark De Bruyn, Nina O. Therkildsen, Paul Bentzen, Jakob Hemmer-Hansen & Gary R. Carvalho
Recent advances in genetic and genomic analysis have greatly improved our understanding of spatial population structure in marine species. However, studies addressing phylogeographic patterns at oceanic spatial scales remain rare. In Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), existing range‐wide examinations suggest significant transatlantic divergence, although the fine‐scale contemporary distribution of populations and potential for secondary contact are largely unresolved. Here, we explore transatlantic phylogeography in Atlantic cod using a data‐synthesis approach, integrating multiple genome‐wide single‐nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)...

Data from: A meta-analysis of the agents of selection on floral traits

Christina Marie Caruso, Katherine Elizabeth Eisen, Ryan A. Martin & Nina Sletvold
Floral traits are hypothesized to evolve primarily in response to selection by pollinators. However, selection can also be mediated by other environmental factors. To understand the relative importance of pollinator-mediated selection and its variation among trait and pollinator types, we analyzed directional selection gradients on floral traits from experiments that manipulated the environment to identify agents of selection. Pollinator-mediated selection was stronger than selection by other biotic factors (e.g. herbivores), but similar in strength to...

Data from: The perceptual and chemical basis of egg discrimination in communally nesting Greater Anis (Crotophaga major)

Mark E. Hauber, Miri Dainson, Daniel T. Baldassarre, Marouf Hossain, Mande Holford & Christina Riehl
The eggshells of communally breeding Greater Anis (Crotophaga major) consist of a blue-green pigmented calcite matrix overlaid by a chalky white layer of vaterite, both of which are polymorphs of calcium carbonate. The white vaterite layer is intact in freshly laid eggs and may function in protecting the eggs from mechanical damage, but it also abrades during incubation to reveal the blue calcite shell underneath. Previous research has shown that this color change serves a...

Data from: A shady phytoplankton paradox: when phytoplankton increases under low light

Masato Yamamichi, Takehiro Kazama, Kotaro Tokita, Izumi Katano, Hideyuki Doi, Takehito Yoshida, Nelson Hairston, Jotaro Urabe & Nelson G. Hairston
Light is a fundamental driver of ecosystem dynamics, affecting the rate of photosynthesis and primary production. In spite of its importance, less is known about its community-scale effects on aquatic ecosystems compared with those of nutrient loading. Understanding light limitation is also important for ecosystem management, as human activities have been rapidly altering light availability to aquatic ecosystems. Here we show that decreasing light can paradoxically increase phytoplankton abundance in shallow lakes. Our results, based...

Data from: Geographic patterns of song variation in four species of Malurus fairy-wrens

David D. Yandell, Wesley M. Hochachka, Stephen Pruett-Jones, Michael S. Webster & Emma I. Greig
Geographic variation in song is widespread among birds, particularly in species that learn vocalizations. The relationship between geographic distance and song variation is likely related to the degree of isolation between populations. To assess this effect of geographic isolation on song divergence, we examined patterns of geographic song variation in four species of Australian fairy-wrens (Malurus), two with suspected histories of geographic isolation and two without. Song variation in all four species was consistent with...

Data from: Candidate variants for additive and interactive effects on bioenergy traits in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) identified by genome-wide association analyses

Guillaume P. Ramstein, Joseph Evans, Aruna Nandety, Malay C. Saha, E. Charles Brummer, Shawn M. Kaeppler, C. Robin Buell & Michael D. Casler
Switchgrass is a promising herbaceous energy crop, but further gains in biomass yield and quality must be achieved to enable a viable bioenergy industry. Developing DNA markers can contribute to such progress, but depiction of genetic bases should be reliable, involving not only simple additive marker effects but also interactions with genetic backgrounds, e.g., ecotypes, or synergies with other markers. We analyzed plant height, carbon content, nitrogen content, and mineral concentration in a diverse panel...

Data from: Purifying selection in the toll-like receptors of song sparrows Melospiza melodia

Martha J. Nelson-Flower, Ryan R. Germain, Elizabeth A. MacDougall-Shackleton, Sabrina S. Taylor & Peter Arcese
Variation in immune gene sequences is known to influence resistance to infectious diseases and parasites, and hence survival and mate choice, across animal taxa. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) comprise one essential gene family in the vertebrate innate immune system, and recognize evolutionarily conserved structures from all major microorganism classes. However, the causes and consequences of TLR variation in passerine birds remain largely unexplored. We examined seven TLR genes in song sparrows (Melospiza melodia), a species that...

Data from: Modeling strategic sperm allocation: tailoring the predictions to the species

Biz R. Turnell, Kerry L. Shaw & Hudson Kern Reeve
Two major challenges exist when empirically testing the predictions of sperm allocation theory. First, the study species must adhere to the assumptions of the model being tested. Unfortunately, the common assumption of sperm allocation models that females mate a maximum of once or twice does not hold for many, if not most, multiply and sequentially mating animals. Second, a model’s parameters, which dictate its predictions, must be measured in the study species. Common examples of...

Data from: Demography and selection shape transcriptomic divergence in field crickets

Thomas Blankers, Sibelle Torres Vilaça, Isabelle Waurick, David A. Gray, R. Matthias Hennig, Camilla J. Mazzoni, Frieder Mayer & Emma L. Berdan
Gene flow, demography, and selection can result in similar patterns of genomic variation and disentangling their effects is key to understanding speciation. Here, we assess transcriptomic variation to unravel the evolutionary history of Gryllus rubens and G. texensis, cryptic field cricket species with highly divergent mating behavior. We infer their demographic history and screen their transcriptomes for footprints of selection in the context of the inferred demography. We find strong support for a long history...

Data from: Duetting behavior in a Neotropical ovenbird: sexual and seasonal variation and adaptive signaling functions

Pedro Diniz, , Michael S. Webster & Regina H. Macedo
Duetting is a collective behavior and might have multiple functions, including joint territory defense and mate guarding. An important step toward understanding the adaptive function of bird song is to determine if and how singing behavior varies seasonally. However, seasonal patterns for duetting species are different from the pattern described for species in which only the male sings, because song function may vary according to sex, singing role (initiator vs. responder) and level of duet...

Data from: Incomplete host immunity favors the evolution of virulence in an emergent pathogen

Arietta E. Fleming-Davies, Paul D. Williams, André A. Dhondt, Andrew P. Dobson, Wesley A. Hochachka, Ariel E. Leon, David H. Ley, Erik E. Osnas & Dana M. Hawley
Immune memory evolved to protect hosts from reinfection, but incomplete responses that allow future reinfection might inadvertently select for more harmful pathogens. We present empirical and modeling evidence that incomplete immunity promotes the evolution of higher virulence in a natural host-pathogen system. We performed sequential infections of house finches with Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains of varying virulence. Virulent bacterial strains generated stronger host protection against reinfection than less virulent strains, and thus excluded less virulent strains...

Data from: Contrasting effects of landscape composition on crop yield mediated by specialist herbivores

Ricardo Perez-Alvarez, Brian A. Nault & Katja Poveda
Landscape composition not only affects a variety of arthropod-mediated ecosystem services, but also disservices, such as herbivory by insect pests that may have negative effects on crop yield. Yet, little is known about how different habitats influence the dynamics of multiple herbivore species, and ultimately their collective impact on crop production. Using cabbage as a model system, we examined how landscape composition influenced the incidence of three specialist cruciferous pests (aphids, flea beetles and leaf-feeding...

Data from: When domes are spandrels: on septation in turritellids (Cerithioidea) and other gastropods

Brendan M. Anderson & Warren D. Allmon
Although generally considered rare in gastropods, septation has long been noted in turritellids, but functional hypotheses do not survive strong scrutiny. Here we outline a methodology for testing spandrel hypotheses, and apply it to the problem of turritellid septa. We follow Gould in using “spandrel” as a term for all features which are non-adaptive sequelae of adaptive features of organisms, including those which are structurally necessary, those that are developmentally correlated, and non-deterministic byproducts which...

Data from: Rapid seasonal evolution in innate immunity of wild Drosophila melanogaster

Emily L. Behrman, Virginia M. Howick, Martin Kapun, Fabian Staubach, Alan O. Bergland, Dmitri A. Petrov, Brian P. Lazzaro & Paul S. Schmidt
Understanding the rate of evolutionary change and the genetic architecture that facilitates rapid adaptation is a current challenge in evolutionary biology. Comparative studies show that genes with immune function are among the most rapidly evolving genes across a range of taxa. Here, we use immune defence in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster to understand the rate of evolution in natural populations and the genetics underlying rapid change. We probed the immune system using the natural...

Data from: The evolutionary history of dogs in the Americas

Máire Ní Leathlobhair, Angela R. Perri, Evan K. Irving-Pease, Kelsey E. Witt, Anna Linderholm, James Haile, Ophelie Lebrasseur, Carly Ameen, Jeffrey Blick, Adam R. Boyko, Selina Brace, Yahaira Nunes Cortes, Susan J. Crockford, Alison Devault, Evangelos A. Dimopoulos, Morley Eldridge, Jacob Enk, Shyam Gopalakrishnan, Kevin Gori, Vaughan Grimes, Eric Guiry, Anders J. Hansen, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, John Johnson, Andrew Kitchen … & Laurent A. F. Frantz
Dogs were present in the Americas prior to the arrival of European colonists, but the origin and fate of these pre-contact dogs are largely unknown. We sequenced 71 mitochondrial and seven nuclear genomes from ancient North American and Siberian dogs spanning ~9,000 years. Our analysis indicates that American dogs were not domesticated from North American wolves. Instead, American dogs form a monophyletic lineage that likely originated in Siberia and dispersed into the Americas alongside people....

Data from: The lingering impact of stress: brief acute glucocorticoid exposure has sustained, dose-dependent effects on reproduction

Maren N. Vitousek, Conor C. Taff, Daniel R. Ardia, Jocelyn M. Stedman, Cedric Zimmer, Timothy C. Salzman & David W. Winkler
Acutely stressful experiences can have profound and persistent effects on phenotype. Across taxa, individuals differ remarkably in their susceptibility to stress. However, the mechanistic causes of enduring stress effects, and of individual differences in stress susceptibility, are poorly understood. Here we tested whether brief, acute increases in glucocorticoid hormones have persistent effects on phenotype, and whether effects differ according to the magnitude or duration of elevation. We used a novel method to non-invasively manipulate hormone...

Data from: Order-level fern plastome phylogenomics: new insights from Hymenophyllales

Li-Yaung Kuo, Xinping Qi, Hong Ma & Fay-Wei Li
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Filmy ferns (Hymenophyllales) are a highly specialized lineage, having mesophyll one cell layer thick and inhabiting particularly shaded and humid environments. The phylogenetic placement of Hymenophyllales has been inconclusive, and while over 87 whole fern plastomes have been published, none was from Hymenophyllales. To better understand the evolutionary history of filmy ferns, we sequenced the first complete plastome for this order. METHODS: We compiled a plastome phylogenomic dataset encompassing all eleven...

Data from: Effects of mistletoe (Phoradendron villosum) on California oaks

Walter D. Koenig, Johannes M.H. Knops, William J. Carmen, Mario B. Pesendorfer, Janis L. Dickinson & Johannes M. H. Knops
Mistletoes are a widespread group of plants often considered to be hemiparasitic, having detrimental effects on growth and survival of their hosts. We studied the effects of the Pacific mistletoe Phoradendron villosum, a member of a largely autotrophic genus, on three species of deciduous California oaks. We found no effects of mistletoe presence on radial growth or survivorship and detected a significant positive relationship between mistletoe and acorn production. This latter result is potentially explained...

Data from: Field validation of radar systems for monitoring bird migration

Cecilia Nilsson, Adriaan M. Dokter, Baptiste Schmid, Martina Scacco, Liesbeth Verlinden, Johan Bäckman, Günther Haase, Giacomo Dell'Omo, Jason W. Chapman, Hidde Leijnse & Felix Liechti
1. Advances in information technology are increasing the use of radar as a tool to investigate and monitor bird migration movements. We set up a field campaign to compare and validate outputs from different radar systems. 2. Here we compare the pattern of nocturnal bird migration movements recorded by four different radar systems at a site in southern Sweden. Within the range of the weather radar (WR) Ängelholm, we operated a “BirdScan” (BS) dedicated bird...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    87

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    87

Affiliations

  • Cornell University
    87
  • University of California, Berkeley
    5
  • University of Georgia
    4
  • Michigan State University
    4
  • University of Adelaide
    3
  • Stanford University
    3
  • The Ohio State University
    3
  • Lund University
    3
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    3
  • Agricultural Research Service
    3