87 Works

Data from: Relative selectivity of plant cardenolides for Na+/K+-ATPases from the monarch butterfly and non-resistant insects

Georg Petschenka, Colleen S. Fei, Juan J. Araya, Susanne Schröder, Barbara N. Timmermann & Anurag A. Agrawal
A major prediction of coevolutionary theory is that plants may target particular herbivores with secondary compounds that are selectively defensive. The highly specialized monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) copes well with cardiac glycosides (inhibitors of animal Na+/K+-ATPases) from its milkweed host plants, but selective inhibition of its Na+/K+-ATPase by different compounds has not been previously tested. We applied 17 cardiac glycosides to the D. plexippus-Na+/K+-ATPase and to the more susceptible Na+/K+-ATPases of two non-adapted insects (Euploea...

Data from: Bt eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) in Bangladesh: Fruit production and control of eggplant fruit and shoot borer (Leucinodes orbonalis Guenee), effects on non-target arthropods and economic returns

M.Z.H. Prodhan, M.T Hasan, M.M.I. Chowdhury, Alam , M.L. Rahman, A.K. Azad, M.J. Hossain, Steve E. Naranjo & Anthony M. Shelton
Eggplant or brinjal (Solanum melongena) is a popular vegetable grown throughout Asia where it is attacked by brinjal fruit and shoot borer (BFSB) (Leucinodes orbonalis). Yield losses in Bangladesh have been reported up to 86% and farmers rely primarily on frequent insecticide applications to reduce injury. Bangladesh has developed and released four brinjal varieties producing Cry1Ac (Bt brinjal) and is the first country to do so. We report on the first replicated field trials comparing...

Data from: Soil organic carbon dynamics matching ecological equilibrium theory

Tancredi Caruso, Franciska T. De Vries, Richard D. Bardgett & Johannes Lehmann
The persistence of soil organic carbon (SOC) has traditionally been explained as a combination of recalcitrance properties and stabilization processes, which lead to the formation of complex organic compounds. However, recent conceptual advances and experimental evidence challenge this view. Here, we test these conceptual advances using a dynamic equilibrium theory of SOC founded on classic ecological theory. We postulate that the persistence of SOC is an equilibrium point where SOC losses resulting from continuous decomposition...

Data from: Range-wide genomic data synthesis reveals transatlantic vicariance and secondary contact in Atlantic cod

Robert Fairweather, Ian R. Bradbury, Sarah J. Heylar, Mark De Bruyn, Nina O. Therkildsen, Paul Bentzen, Jakob Hemmer-Hansen & Gary R. Carvalho
Recent advances in genetic and genomic analysis have greatly improved our understanding of spatial population structure in marine species. However, studies addressing phylogeographic patterns at oceanic spatial scales remain rare. In Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), existing range‐wide examinations suggest significant transatlantic divergence, although the fine‐scale contemporary distribution of populations and potential for secondary contact are largely unresolved. Here, we explore transatlantic phylogeography in Atlantic cod using a data‐synthesis approach, integrating multiple genome‐wide single‐nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)...

Data from: A meta-analysis of the agents of selection on floral traits

Christina Marie Caruso, Katherine Elizabeth Eisen, Ryan A. Martin & Nina Sletvold
Floral traits are hypothesized to evolve primarily in response to selection by pollinators. However, selection can also be mediated by other environmental factors. To understand the relative importance of pollinator-mediated selection and its variation among trait and pollinator types, we analyzed directional selection gradients on floral traits from experiments that manipulated the environment to identify agents of selection. Pollinator-mediated selection was stronger than selection by other biotic factors (e.g. herbivores), but similar in strength to...

Data from: The perceptual and chemical basis of egg discrimination in communally nesting Greater Anis (Crotophaga major)

Mark E. Hauber, Miri Dainson, Daniel T. Baldassarre, Marouf Hossain, Mande Holford & Christina Riehl
The eggshells of communally breeding Greater Anis (Crotophaga major) consist of a blue-green pigmented calcite matrix overlaid by a chalky white layer of vaterite, both of which are polymorphs of calcium carbonate. The white vaterite layer is intact in freshly laid eggs and may function in protecting the eggs from mechanical damage, but it also abrades during incubation to reveal the blue calcite shell underneath. Previous research has shown that this color change serves a...

Data from: A shady phytoplankton paradox: when phytoplankton increases under low light

Masato Yamamichi, Takehiro Kazama, Kotaro Tokita, Izumi Katano, Hideyuki Doi, Takehito Yoshida, Nelson Hairston, Jotaro Urabe & Nelson G. Hairston
Light is a fundamental driver of ecosystem dynamics, affecting the rate of photosynthesis and primary production. In spite of its importance, less is known about its community-scale effects on aquatic ecosystems compared with those of nutrient loading. Understanding light limitation is also important for ecosystem management, as human activities have been rapidly altering light availability to aquatic ecosystems. Here we show that decreasing light can paradoxically increase phytoplankton abundance in shallow lakes. Our results, based...

Data from: Geographic patterns of song variation in four species of Malurus fairy-wrens

David D. Yandell, Wesley M. Hochachka, Stephen Pruett-Jones, Michael S. Webster & Emma I. Greig
Geographic variation in song is widespread among birds, particularly in species that learn vocalizations. The relationship between geographic distance and song variation is likely related to the degree of isolation between populations. To assess this effect of geographic isolation on song divergence, we examined patterns of geographic song variation in four species of Australian fairy-wrens (Malurus), two with suspected histories of geographic isolation and two without. Song variation in all four species was consistent with...

Data from: Candidate variants for additive and interactive effects on bioenergy traits in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) identified by genome-wide association analyses

Guillaume P. Ramstein, Joseph Evans, Aruna Nandety, Malay C. Saha, E. Charles Brummer, Shawn M. Kaeppler, C. Robin Buell & Michael D. Casler
Switchgrass is a promising herbaceous energy crop, but further gains in biomass yield and quality must be achieved to enable a viable bioenergy industry. Developing DNA markers can contribute to such progress, but depiction of genetic bases should be reliable, involving not only simple additive marker effects but also interactions with genetic backgrounds, e.g., ecotypes, or synergies with other markers. We analyzed plant height, carbon content, nitrogen content, and mineral concentration in a diverse panel...

Data from: Purifying selection in the toll-like receptors of song sparrows Melospiza melodia

Martha J. Nelson-Flower, Ryan R. Germain, Elizabeth A. MacDougall-Shackleton, Sabrina S. Taylor & Peter Arcese
Variation in immune gene sequences is known to influence resistance to infectious diseases and parasites, and hence survival and mate choice, across animal taxa. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) comprise one essential gene family in the vertebrate innate immune system, and recognize evolutionarily conserved structures from all major microorganism classes. However, the causes and consequences of TLR variation in passerine birds remain largely unexplored. We examined seven TLR genes in song sparrows (Melospiza melodia), a species that...

Data from: Modeling strategic sperm allocation: tailoring the predictions to the species

Biz R. Turnell, Kerry L. Shaw & Hudson Kern Reeve
Two major challenges exist when empirically testing the predictions of sperm allocation theory. First, the study species must adhere to the assumptions of the model being tested. Unfortunately, the common assumption of sperm allocation models that females mate a maximum of once or twice does not hold for many, if not most, multiply and sequentially mating animals. Second, a model’s parameters, which dictate its predictions, must be measured in the study species. Common examples of...

Data from: Demography and selection shape transcriptomic divergence in field crickets

Thomas Blankers, Sibelle Torres Vilaça, Isabelle Waurick, David A. Gray, R. Matthias Hennig, Camilla J. Mazzoni, Frieder Mayer & Emma L. Berdan
Gene flow, demography, and selection can result in similar patterns of genomic variation and disentangling their effects is key to understanding speciation. Here, we assess transcriptomic variation to unravel the evolutionary history of Gryllus rubens and G. texensis, cryptic field cricket species with highly divergent mating behavior. We infer their demographic history and screen their transcriptomes for footprints of selection in the context of the inferred demography. We find strong support for a long history...

Registration Year

  • 2018
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Affiliations

  • Cornell University
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  • University of California, Berkeley
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  • University of Georgia
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  • Michigan State University
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  • University of Adelaide
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  • The Ohio State University
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  • Lund University
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  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
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  • Agricultural Research Service
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