6 Works

Data from: Insights into the development and evolution of exaggerated traits using de novo transcriptomes of two species of horned scarab beetles

Ian A. Warren, J. Cristobal Vera, Annika Johns, Robert Zinna, James H. Marden, Douglas J. Emlen, Ian Dworkin & Laura C. Lavine
Scarab beetles exhibit an astonishing variety of rigid exo-skeletal outgrowths, known as “horns”. These traits are often sexually dimorphic and vary dramatically across species in size, shape, location, and allometry with body size. In many species, the horn exhibits disproportionate growth resulting in an exaggerated allometric relationship with body size, as compared to other traits, such as wings, that grow proportionately with body size. Depending on the species, the smallest males either do not produce...

Data from: Artificial selection on larval growth curves in Tribolium: correlated responses and constraints

Kristen K. Irwin & Pat A. Carter
Body size is often constrained from evolving. Although artificial selection on body size in insects frequently results in a sizable response, these responses usually bear fitness costs. Further, these experiments tend to select only on size at one landmark age, rather than selecting for patterns of growth over the whole larval life stage. To address whether constraints may be caused by larval growth patterns rather than final size, we implemented a function-valued (FV) trait method...

Data from: Mapping and expression of candidate genes for development rate in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

Matthew C. Hale, John A. Colletti, Scott A. Gahr, Julie Scardina, Frank P. Thrower, Matthew Harmon, Megan Carter, Ruth B. Phillips, Gary H. Thorgaard, Caird E. Rexroad & Krista M. Nichols
Development rate has important implications for individual fitness and physiology. In salmonid fishes, development rate correlates with many traits later in life, including life history diversity, growth, and age and size at sexual maturation. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), a Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) for embryonic development rate has been detected on chromosome 5 across populations. However, few candidate genes have been identified within this region. In this study, we use gene mapping, gene expression,...

Data from: Comparative landscape genetics of two river frog species occurring at different elevations on Mount Kilimanjaro

Giulia Zancolli, Mark-Oliver Rödel, Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter & Andrew Storfer
Estimating population connectivity and species’ abilities to disperse across the landscape is crucial for understanding the long-term persistence of species in changing environments. Surprisingly, few landscape genetics studies focused on tropical regions despite the alarming extinction rates within these ecosystems. Here, we compared the influence of landscape features on the distribution of genetic variation of an Afromontane frog, Amietia wittei, with that of its more broadly distributed lowland congener, A. angolensis, on Mt. Kilimanjaro, Tanzania....

Data from: Host species composition influences infection severity among amphibians in the absence of spillover transmission

Barbara A. Han, Jacob L. Kerby, Catherine L. Searle, Andrew Storfer, Andy R. Blaustein & Andrew R. Blaustein
Wildlife epidemiological outcomes can depend strongly on the composition of an ecological community, particularly when multiple host species are affected by the same pathogen. However, the relationship between host species richness and disease risk can vary with community context and with the degree of spillover transmission that occurs among co-occurring host species. We examined the degree to which host species composition influences infection by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a widespread fungal pathogen associated with amphibian population...

Data from: Inferring outcrossing in the homothallic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum using linkage disequilibrium decay

Weidong Chen, Renuka N. Attanayake, Vidhura Tennekoon, Dennis A. Johnson, Lyndon D. Porter, Luis Del Río-Mendoza & Daohong Jiang
The occurrence and frequency of outcrossing in homothallic fungal species in nature is an unresolved question. Here we report detection of frequent outcrossing in the homothallic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. In using multilocus linkage disequilibrium (LD) to infer recombination among microsatellite alleles, high mutation rates confound the estimates of recombination. To distinguish high mutation rates from recombination to infer outcrossing, 8 population samples comprising 268 S. sclerotiorum isolates from widely distributed agricultural fields were genotyped for...

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  • Washington State University
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  • University of South Dakota
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  • Dakota State University
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  • Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies
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  • Alaska Fisheries Science Center
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  • United States Department of Agriculture
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