21 Works

Data from: Molecular characterization of resistance to soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd. & Syd.) in soybean cultivar DT 2000 (PI 635999)

Tri Vuong, David R. Walker, Binh T. Nguyen, Tuyet T. Nguyen, Hoan X. Dinh, David L. Hyten, Perry B. Cregan, David A. Sleper, Jeong D. Lee, James G. Shannon & Tri D. Vuong
Resistance to soybean rust (SBR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd. & Syd., has been identified in many soybean germplasm accessions and is conferred by either dominant or recessive genes that have been mapped to six independent loci (Rpp1 –Rpp6), but No U.S. cultivars are resistant to SBR. The cultivar DT 2000 (PI 635999) has resistance to P. pachyrhizi isolates and field populations from the United States as well as Vietnam. A F6:7 recombinant inbred line...

Data from: Environmental DNA (eDNA) detects the invasive rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) at low abundances

Matthew M. Dougherty, Eric R. Larson, Mark A. Renshaw, Crysta A. Gantz, Scott P. Egan, Daniel M. Erickson & David M. Lodge
Early detection is invaluable for the cost-effective control and eradication of invasive species, yet many traditional sampling techniques are ineffective at the low population abundances found at the onset of the invasion process. Environmental DNA (eDNA) is a promising and sensitive tool for early detection of some invasive species, but its efficacy has not yet been evaluated for many taxonomic groups and habitat types. We evaluated the ability of eDNA to detect the invasive rusty...

Data from: Ecological genomics of mutualism decline in nitrogen-fixing bacteria

Christie R. Klinger, Jennifer A. Lau & Katy D. Heath
Anthropogenic changes can influence mutualism evolution; however, the genomic regions underpinning mutualism that are most affected by environmental change are generally unknown, even in well-studied model mutualisms like the interaction between legumes and their nitrogen (N)-fixing rhizobia. Such genomic information can shed light on the agents and targets of selection maintaining cooperation in nature. We recently demonstrated that N-fertilization has caused an evolutionary decline in mutualistic partner quality in the rhizobia that form symbiosis with...

Data from: RADcap: sequence capture of dual-digest RADseq libraries with identifiable duplicates and reduced missing data

Sandra L. Hoffberg, Troy J. Kieran, Julian M. Catchen, Alison Devault, Brant C. Faircloth, Rodney Mauricio & Travis C. Glenn
Molecular ecologists seek to genotype hundreds to thousands of loci from hundreds to thousands of individuals at minimal cost per sample. Current methods, such as restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) and sequence capture, are constrained by costs associated with inefficient use of sequencing data and sample preparation. Here, we introduce RADcap, an approach that combines the major benefits of RADseq (low cost with specific start positions) with those of sequence capture (repeatable sequencing of...

Data from: Spatial and successional dynamics of microbial biofilm communities in a grassland stream ecosystem

Allison M. Veach, James C. Stegen, Shawn P. Brown, Walter K. Dodds & Ari Jumpponen
Biofilms represent a metabolically active and structurally complex component of freshwater ecosystems. Ephemeral prairie streams are hydrologically harsh and prone to frequent perturbation. Elucidating both functional and structural community changes over time within prairie streams provides a general understanding of microbial responses to environmental disturbance. We examined microbial succession of biofilm communities at three sites in a third-order stream at Konza Prairie over a 2- to 64-day period. Microbial abundance (bacterial abundance, chlorophyll a concentrations)...

Data from: A complete molecular phylogeny of Claravis confirms its paraphyly within small New World ground-doves (Aves: Peristerinae) and implies multiple plumage state transitions

Andrew D. Sweet, J. Dylan Maddox & Kevin P. Johnson
The three species in the genus Claravis (Aves: Peristerinae) are unique among members of the small New World ground-dove clade. All three species inhabit forested areas rather than open scrubby habitat, and exhibit obvious sexual dichromatism. However, the phylogenetic relationships within Claravis remain unknown. The only molecular phylogenetic study to include more than one species of Claravis indicated the genus is paraphyletic. Here we include molecular data from all three Claravis species, including sequences from...

Data from: Late Cenozoic onset of the latitudinal diversity gradient of North American mammals

Jonathan D. Marcot, David L. Fox & Spencer R. Niebuhr
The decline of species richness from equator to pole, or latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG), is nearly universal among clades of living organisms, yet whether it was such a pervasive pattern in the geologic past remains uncertain. Here, we calculate the strength of the LDG for terrestrial mammals in North America over the past 65 My, using 27,903 fossil occurrences of Cenozoic terrestrial mammals from western North America downloaded from the Paleobiology Database. Accounting for temporal...

Data from: Divergence of the diapause transcriptome in apple maggot flies: winter regulation and post-winter transcriptional repression

Peter J. Meyers, Thomas H. Q. Powell, Kimberly K. O. Walden, Adam Shieferecke, Jeffrey L. Feder, Daniel A. Hahn, Hugh M. Robertson, Stewart H. Berlocher & Gregory J. Ragland
Duration of dormancy regulates seasonal timing in many organisms and may be modulated by day length and temperature. Though photoperiodic modulation has been well studied, temperature modulation of dormancy has received less attention. Here, we leverage genetic variation in diapause in the apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella, to test whether gene expression during winter or following spring warming regulates diapause duration. We used RNAseq to compare transcript abundance during and after simulated winter between an...

Data from: Estimating resource preferences of a native bumblebee: the effects of availability and use-availability models on preference estimatess

Alexandra N. Harmon-Threatt, Perry De Valpine & Claire Kremen
Identifying resource preference is considered essential for developing targeted conservation plans but, for many species, questions remain about the best way to estimate preference. Resource preferences for bees are particularly difficult to determine as the resources they collect, nectar and pollen, are challenging to estimate availability and collection. Resources are traditionally measured at the flower or inflorescence level, but these measures of availability do not correspond to the resources actually used by bees. Additionally, it...

Data from: Climatic thresholds shape northern high-latitude fire regimes and imply vulnerability to future climate change

Adam M. Young, Philip E. Higuera, Paul A. Duffy & Feng Sheng Hu
Boreal forests and arctic tundra cover 33% of global land area and store an estimated 50% of total soil carbon. Because wildfire is a key driver of terrestrial carbon cycling, increasing fire activity in these ecosystems would likely have global implications. To anticipate potential spatiotemporal variability in fire-regime shifts, we modeled the spatially explicit 30-yr probability of fire occurrence as a function of climate and landscape features (i.e. vegetation and topography) across Alaska. Boosted regression...

Data from: Soil-mediated eco-evolutionary feedbacks in the invasive plant Alliaria petiolata

Jeffrey A. Evans, Richard A. Lankau, Adam S. Davis, S. Raghu & Douglas A. Landis
Ecological and evolutionary processes historically have been assumed to operate on significantly different time scales. We know now from theory and work in experimental and model systems that these processes can feed back on each other on mutually relevant time scales. Here, we present evidence of a soil-mediated eco-evolutionary feedback on the population dynamics of an invasive biennial plant, Alliaria petiolata. As populations age, natural selection drives down production of A. petiolata's important anti-mycorrhizal allelochemical,...

Data from: Constraints of cold and shade on the phenology of spring ephemeral herb species

Carol K. Augspurger & Carl F. Salk
Spring ephemeral herb species in temperate deciduous forests are active above-ground only briefly each year. This study tested experimentally how two countervailing constraints – cold and darkness – influence the phenology of six spring herb species. Dormancy of underground structures, maintained by cold temperatures in a growth chamber, was broken at six 25-day intervals from January or February to June in two consecutive years. Upon emergence, survival and flowering were measured on cohorts grown outdoors....

Data from: Trait-demography relationships underlying small mammal population fluctuations

Koen J. Van Benthem, Hannah Froy, Tim Coulson, Lowell L. Getz, Madan K. Oli & Arpat Ozgul
Large-scale fluctuations in abundance are a common feature of small mammal populations and have been the subject of extensive research. These demographic fluctuations are often associated with concurrent changes in the average body mass of individuals, sometimes referred to as the ‘Chitty effect’. Despite the long-standing recognition of this phenomenon, an empirical investigation of the underlying coupled dynamics of body mass and population growth has been lacking. Using long-term life-history data combined with a trait-based...

Data from: Exploring visual plasticity: dietary carotenoids can change color vision in guppies (Poecilia reticulata)

Benjamin A. Sandkam, Kerry A. Deere-Machemer, Ashley M. Johnson, Gregory F. Grether, F. Helen Rodd & Rebecca C. Fuller
Differences in color vision can play a key role in an organism’s ability to perceive and interact with the environment across a broad range of taxa. Recently, species have been shown to vary in color vision across populations as a result of differences in regulatory sequence and/or plasticity of opsin gene expression. For decades, biologists have been intrigued by among-population variation in color-based mate preferences of female Trinidadian guppies. We proposed that some of this...

Data from: Intraspecific variation in seed dispersal of a Neotropical tree and its relationship to fruit and tree traits

Carol K. Augspurger, Susan E. Franson, Katherine C. Cushman & Helene C. Muller-Landau
The distribution of wind-dispersed seeds around a parent tree depends on diaspore and tree traits, as well as wind conditions and surrounding vegetation. This study of a neotropical canopy tree, Platypodium elegans, explored the extent to which parental variation in diaspore and tree traits explained (1) rate of diaspore descent in still air, (2) distributions of diaspores dispersed from a 40-m tower in the forest, and (3) natural diaspore distributions around the parent tree. The...

Data from: Carbon dynamics of mature and regrowth tropical forests derived from a pantropical database (TropForC-db)

Kristina J. Anderson-Teixeira, Maria M. H. Wang, Jennifer C. McGarvey & David S. LeBauer
Tropical forests play a critical role in the global carbon (C) cycle, storing ~45% of terrestrial C and constituting the largest component of the terrestrial C sink. Despite their central importance to the global C cycle, their ecosystem-level C cycles are not as well characterized as those of extra-tropical forests, and knowledge gaps hamper efforts to quantify C budgets across the tropics and to model tropical forest- climate interactions. To advance understanding of C dynamics...

Data from: A test of the invasive pathogen hypothesis of bumble bee decline in North America

Sydney A. Cameron, Haw C. Lim, Jeffrey D. Lozier, Michelle Audrey Duennes & Robbin Thorp
Emergent fungal diseases are critical factors in global biodiversity declines. The fungal pathogen Nosema bombi was recently found to be widespread in declining species of North American bumble bees (Bombus), with circumstantial evidence suggesting an exotic introduction from Europe. This interpretation has been hampered by a lack of knowledge of global genetic variation, geographic origin, and changing prevalence patterns of N. bombi in declining North American populations. Thus, the temporal and spatial emergence of N....

Data from: Selection on parental performance opposes selection for larger body mass in a wild population of blue tits

Caroline Elizabeth Thomson, Florian Bayer, Nicholas Crouch, Samantha Farrell, Elizabeth Heap, Elizabeth Mittell, Mar Zurita-Cassinello & Jarrod D. Hadfield
There is abundant evidence in many taxa for positive directional selection on body size, and yet little evidence for microevolutionary change. In many species, variation in body size is partly determined by the actions of parents, so a proposed explanation for stasis is the presence of a negative genetic correlation between direct and parental effects. Consequently, selecting genes for increased body size would result in a correlated decline in parental effects, reducing body size in...

Data from: A comparative analysis reveals little evidence for niche conservatism in aquatic macrophytes among four areas on two continents

Janne Alahuhta, Frauke Ecke, Lucinda B. Johnson, Laura Sass & Jani Heino
One of the most intriguing questions in current ecology is the extent to which the ecological niches of species are conserved in space and time. Niche conservatism has mostly been studied using coarse-scale data of species' distributions, although it is at the local habitat scales where species' responses to ecological variables primarily take place. We investigated the extent to which niches of aquatic macrophytes are conserved among four study regions (i.e. Finland, Sweden and the...

Data from: Elevated CO2 and temperature increase soil C losses from a soybean-maize ecosystem

Christopher K. Black, Sarah C. Davis, Tara W. Hudiburg, Carl J. Bernacchi & Evan H. DeLucia
Warming temperatures and increasing CO2 are likely to have large effects on the amount of carbon stored in soil, but predictions of these effects are poorly constrained. We elevated temperature (canopy: +2.8 °C; soil growing season: +1.8 °C; soil fallow: +2.3 °C) for 3 years within the 9th–11th years of an elevated CO2 (+200 ppm) experiment on a maize–soybean agroecosystem, measured respiration by roots and soil microbes, and then used a process-based ecosystem model (DayCent)...

Data from: Distinguishing migration events of different timing for wild boar in the Balkans

Panoraia Alexandri, Hendrik-Jan Megens, Richard P. M. A. Crooijmans, Martien A. M. Groenen, Daniel J. Goedbloed, Juan M. Herrero-Medrano, Lauretta A. Rund, Lawrence B. Schook, Evangelos Chatzinikos, Costas Triantaphyllidis, Alexandros Triantafyllidis, Laurence B. Schook & Alexander Triantafyllidis
Aim: We compared the power of different nuclear markers to investigate genetic structure of southern Balkan wild boar. We distinguished between historic events, such as isolation in different refugia during glacial periods, from recent demographic processes, such as naturally occurring expansions. Location: Southern Balkans/Greece. Methods: We sampled 555 wild boars from 20 different locations in southern Balkans/Greece. All individuals were analysed with 10 microsatellites and a subgroup of 91 with 49,508 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)....

Registration Year

  • 2016
    21

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    21

Affiliations

  • University of Illinois System
    21
  • University of Notre Dame
    2
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • University of Edinburgh
    2
  • University of Florida
    2
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    2
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    2
  • University of Idaho
    2
  • University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
    2