8 Works

Data from: Snap-jaw morphology is specialized for high-speed power amplification in the Dracula ant, Mystrium camillae

Fredrick J. Larabee, Adrian A. Smith & Andrew V. Suarez
What is the limit of animal speed and what mechanisms produce the fastest movements? More than natural history trivia, the answer provides key insight into the form-function relationship of musculoskeletal movement and can determine the outcome of predator-prey interactions. The fastest known animal movements belong to arthropods, including trap-jaw ants, mantis shrimp, and froghoppers, that have incorporated latches and springs into their appendage systems to overcome the limits of muscle power. In contrast to these...

Data from: Taxon cycle predictions supported by model-based inference in Indo-Pacific trap-jaw ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Odontomachus)

Pável Matos-Maraví, Nicholas J. Matzke, Fredrick J. Larabee, Ronald M. Clouse, Ward C. Wheeler, Daniela Magdalena Sorger, Andrew V. Suarez & Milan Janda
Non-equilibrium dynamics and non-neutral processes, such as trait-dependent dispersal, are often missing from quantitative island biogeography models despite their potential explanatory value. One of the most influential non-equilibrium models is the taxon cycle, but it has been difficult to test its validity as a general biogeographical framework. Here, we test predictions of the taxon-cycle model using six expected phylogenetic patterns and a time-calibrated phylogeny of Indo-Pacific Odontomachus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Ponerinae), one of the ant genera...

Data from: Simultaneous radiation of bird and mammal lice following the K-Pg boundary

Kevin P. Johnson, Nam-Phuong Nguyen, Andrew D. Sweet, Bret M. Boyd, Tandy Warnow & Julie M. Allen
The diversification of parasite groups often occurs at the same time as the diversification of their hosts. However, most studies demonstrating this concordance only examine single host-parasite groups. Multiple diverse lineages of ectoparasitic lice occur across both birds and mammals. Here we describe the evolutionary history of lice based on analyses of 1,107 single copy orthologous genes from sequenced genomes of 46 species of lice. We identify three major diverse groups of lice: one exclusively...

Data from: Fire increases drought vulnerability of Quercus alba juveniles by altering forest microclimate and nitrogen availability

Tyler Refsland & Jennifer Fraterrigo
1. Shifts in rainfall patterns due to climate change are expected to increase drought stress and mortality in forests. Natural and anthropogenic fire regimes are also changing, highlighting the need to understand the interactive effects of fire and drought on tree ecophysiological response and growth. 2. Using rainout shelters, we imposed summer drought on natural and planted populations of Quercus alba juveniles located in periodically burned and unburned sites in Shawnee National Forest, IL, USA....

Data from: Variation in individual temperature preferences, not behavioural fever, affects susceptibility to chytridiomycosis in amphibians

Erin L. Sauer, Rebecca C. Fuller, Corinne L. Richards-Zawacki, Julia Sonn, Jinelle H. Sperry & Jason R. Rohr
The ability of wildlife populations to mount rapid responses to novel pathogens will be critical for mitigating the impacts of disease outbreaks in a changing climate. Field studies have documented that amphibians preferring warmer temperatures are less likely to be infected with the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). However, it is unclear whether this phenomenon is driven by behavioural fever or natural variation in thermal preference. Here, we placed frogs in thermal gradients, tested for...

Data from: Multifactorial processes underlie parallel opsin loss in neotropical bats

Alexa Sadier, Kalina T. J. Davies, Laurel R. Yohe, Kun Yun, Paul Donat, Brandon P. Hedrick, Elizabeth R. Dumont, Liliana M. Davalos, Stephen J. Rossiter & Karen E. Sears
The loss of previously adaptive traits is typically linked to relaxation in selection, yet the molecular steps leading to such repeated losses are rarely known. Molecular studies of loss have tended to focus on gene sequences alone, but overlooking other aspects of protein expression might underestimate phenotypic diversity. Insights based almost solely on opsin gene evolution, for instance, have made mammalian color vision a textbook example of phenotypic loss. We address this gap by investigating...

Data from: Phylogenomics and the evolution of hemipteroid insects

Kevin P. Johnson, Christopher H. Dietrich, Frank Friedrich, Rolf G. Beutel, Benjamin Wipfler, Ralph S. Peters, Julie M. Allen, Malte Petersen, Alexander Donath, Kimberly K. O. Walden, Alexey M. Kozlov, Lars Podsiadlowski, Christoph Mayer, Karen Meusemann, Alexandros Vasilikopoulos, Robert M. Waterhouse, Stephen L. Cameron, Christiane Weirauch, Daniel R. Swanson, Diana M. Percy, Nate B. Hardy, Irene Terry, Shanlin Liu, Xin Zhou, Bernhard Misof … & Kazunori Yoshizawa
Hemipteroid insects (Paraneoptera), with over 10% of all known insect diversity, are a major component of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Previous phylogenetic analyses have not consistently resolved the relationships among major hemipteroid lineages. We provide maximum likelihood-based phylogenomic analyses of a taxonomically comprehensive dataset comprising sequences of 2,395 single-copy, protein-coding genes for 193 samples of hemipteroid insects and outgroups. These analyses yield a well-supported phylogeny for hemipteroid insects. Monophyly of each of the three hemipteroid...

Data from: The pervasive effects of lighting environments on sensory drive in bluefin killifish: an investigation into male/male competition, female choice, and predation

Lisa D. Mitchem, Shannon Stanis, Nicholas M. Sutton, Zachary Turner & Rebecca C. Fuller
Sensory drive predicts that the conditions under which signaling takes place have large effects on signals, sensory systems, and behavior. The coupling of an ecological genetics approach with sensory drive has been fruitful. An ecological genetics approach compares populations that experience different environments and asks whether population differences are adaptive and are the result of genetic and/or environmental variation. The multi-faceted effects of signaling environments are well-exemplified by the bluefin killifish. In this system, males...

Registration Year

  • 2018
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Illinois System
    8
  • North Carolina State University
    2
  • University of Hamburg
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig
    1
  • Natural History Museum
    1
  • University of California, San Diego
    1
  • University of Lausanne
    1
  • Australian National University
    1
  • University of Pittsburgh
    1