12 Works

Data from: The evolutionary relationships and age of Homo naledi: an assessment using dated Bayesian phylogenetic methods

Mana Dembo, Davorka Radovčić, Heather M. Garvin, Myra F. Laird, Lauren Schroeder, Jill E. Scott, Juliet Brophy, Rebecca R. Ackermann, Charles M. Musiba, Darryl J. De Ruiter, Arne Ø. Mooers, Mark Collard & Chares M. Musiba
Homo naledi is a recently discovered species of fossil hominin from South Africa. A considerable amount is already known about H. naledi but some important questions remain unanswered. Here we report a study that addressed two of them: “Where does H. naledi fit in the hominin evolutionary tree?” and “How old is it?” We used a large supermatrix of craniodental characters for both early and late hominin species and Bayesian phylogenetic techniques to carry out...

Data from: Phylogeography and species delimitation in convict cichlids (Cichlidae: Amatitlania): implications for taxonomy and Plio–Pleistocene evolutionary history in Central America

Justin C. Bagley, Wilfredo A. Matamoros, Caleb D. McMahan, Michael Tobler, Prosanta Chakrabarty & Jerald B. Johnson
We investigate phylogeographic patterns and delimit species boundaries within Amatitlania, a genus of Central American cichlid fishes. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequences from 318 individuals spanning the geographical ranges of all three currently recognized Amatitlania species strongly supported one major clade, with a relatively diverged subclade corresponding to A. kanna samples from eastern Costa Rica and Panama. Gene trees and networks revealed marked incongruences between phylogeographic structure and morpho-species taxonomy as a result of...

Data from: Behavioral response to song and genetic divergence in two subspecies of white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys)

Sara E. Lipshutz, Isaac A. Overcast, Michael J. Hickerson, Robb T. Brumfield & Elizabeth P. Derryberry
Divergence in sexual signals may drive reproductive isolation between lineages, but behavioral barriers can weaken in contact zones. Here, we investigate the role of song as a behavioral and genetic barrier in a contact zone between two subspecies of white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys). We employed a reduced genomic dataset to assess population structure and infer the history underlying divergence, gene flow and hybridization. We also measured divergence in song and tested behavioral responses to song...

Data from: The biogeography of sodium in Neotropical figs (Moraceae)

Adriana Bravo & Kyle E. Harms
Sodium is essential for animals but not for most plants. Terrestrial sodium comes largely from marine aerosols, so inland ecosystems should have greater potential for sodium limitation than coastal ecosystems. We report a significant decrease of sodium in fruits of four Neotropical Ficus species with distance from presumed marine source.

Data from: Spatiotemporal patterns of duck nest density and predation risk: a multi-scale analysis of 18 years and more than 10 000 nests

Kevin Ringelman, John M. Eadie, Joshua T. Ackerman, Andy Sih, Daniel L. Loughman, Gregory S. Yarris, Shaun L. Oldenburger, M. Robert McLandress, Kevin M. Ringelman & Andrew Sih
Many avian species are behaviorally-plastic in selecting nest sites, and may shift to new locations or habitats following an unsuccessful breeding attempt. If there is predictable spatial variation in predation risk, the process of many individuals using prior experience to adaptively change nest sites may scale up to create shifting patterns of nest density at a population level. We used 18 years of waterfowl nesting data to assess whether there were areas of consistently high...

Data from: Tectonic collision and uplift of Wallacea triggered the global songbird radiation

Robert G. Moyle, Carl H. Oliveros, Michael J. Andersen, Peter A. Hosner, Brett W. Benz, Joseph D. Manthey, Scott L. Travers, Rafe M. Brown & Brant C. Faircloth
Songbirds (oscine passerines) are the most species rich and cosmopolitan bird group, comprising almost half of global avian species diversity. Because of their diversity and ubiquity, songbirds are used extensively in studies of evolutionary ecology, diversification, and ethology. Songbirds originated in Australia, but the evolutionary trajectory from a single species in an isolated continent to worldwide proliferation is poorly understood. Prior research suggested songbird diversification scenarios that are largely uncoupled from Earth history, including extensive...

Data from: Vascular patterns in the heads of crocodilians: blood vessels and sites of thermal exchange

William Ruger Porter, Jayc C. Sedlmayr & Lawrence M. Witmer
Extant crocodilians are a highly apomorphic archosaur clade that is endothermic, yet often achieve large body sizes that can be subject to higher heat loads. Therefore, the anatomical and physiological roles that blood vessels play in crocodilian thermoregulation need further investigation to better understand how crocodilians establish and maintain cephalic temperatures and regulate neurosensory tissue temperatures during basking and normal activities. The cephalic vascular anatomy of extant crocodilians, particularly American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) was investigated...

Data from: The negative effects of pathogen-infected prey on predators: a meta-analysis

Andrew J. Flick, Miguel A. Acevedo & Bret D. Elderd
Intra-guild predation (IGP) – where a top predator (IGPred) consumes both a basal resource and a competitor for that resource (IGPrey) – has become a fundamental part of understanding species interactions and community dynamics. IGP communities composed of intraguild predators and prey have been well studied; however, we know less about IGP communities composed of predators, pathogens, and resources. Resource quality plays an important role in community dynamics and may influence IGP dynamics as well....

Data from: Willet be one species or two?: a genomic view of the evolutionary history of Tringa semipalmata

Jessica A. Oswald, Michael G. Harvey, Rosalind C. Remsen, DePaul U. Foxworth, Steven W. Cardiff, Donna L. Dittmann, Libby C. Megna, Matthew D. Carling & Robb T. Brumfield
The Willet (Tringa semipalmata; Scolopacidae) is composed of 2 morphologically and vocally distinct subspecies with broadly disjunct breeding distributions in North America. Nominate T. s. semipalmata breeds in coastal salt and brackish marshes along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of eastern North America and the West Indies, and T. s. inornata breeds in wet grasslands and prairies in the northwestern interior of North America. To assess divergence and test for hybridization between the 2 subspecies,...

Data from: High phylogenetic utility of an ultraconserved element probe set designed for Arachnida

James Starrett, Shahan Derkarabetian, Marshal Hedin, , John E. McCormack, Brant C. Faircloth & Robert W. Bryson
Arachnida is an ancient, diverse, and ecologically important animal group that contains a number of species of interest for medical, agricultural, and engineering applications. Despite their importance, many aspects of the arachnid tree of life remain unresolved, hindering comparative approaches to arachnid biology. Biologists have made considerable efforts to resolve the arachnid phylogeny; yet, limited and challenging morphological characters, as well as a dearth of genetic resources, have hindered progress. Here, we present a genomic...

Data from: Phylogenomic analysis of carangimorph fishes reveals flatfish asymmetry arose in a blink of the evolutionary eye

Richard C. Harrington, Brant C. Faircloth, Ron I. Eytan, W. Leo Smith, Thomas J. Near, Michael E. Alfaro & Matt Friedman
Background: Flatfish cranial asymmetry represents one of the most remarkable morphological innovations among vertebrates, and has fueled vigorous debate on the manner and rate at which strikingly divergent phenotypes evolve. A surprising result of many recent molecular phylogenetic studies is the lack of support for flatfish monophyly, where increasingly larger DNA datasets of up to 23 loci have yielded a polyphyletic or only weakly supported flatfish clade. Lack of resolution for flatfish relationships has been...

Data from: Combining citizen science species distribution models and stable isotopes reveals migratory connectivity in the secretive Virginia rail

Auriel M. V. Fournier, Alexis R. Sullivan, Joseph K. Bump, Marie Perkins, Mark C. Shieldcastle & Sammy L. King
Stable hydrogen isotope (δD) methods for tracking animal movement are widely used yet often produce low resolution assignments. Incorporating prior knowledge of abundance, distribution or movement patterns can ameliorate this limitation, but data are lacking for most species. We demonstrate how observations reported by citizen scientists can be used to develop robust estimates of species distributions and to constrain δD assignments. We developed a Bayesian framework to refine isotopic estimates of migrant animal origins conditional...

Registration Year

  • 2016
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  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Louisiana State University
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  • Louisiana State University of Alexandria
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  • University of Kansas
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  • University of California System
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  • Texas A&M University
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  • American Museum of Natural History
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  • Michigan Technological University
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  • City University of New York
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  • University of Washington
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  • Field Museum of Natural History
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