52 Works

FishMob: Interactions between fisher mobility and spatial resource heterogeneity

Emilie Lindkvist
Migration or other long-distance movement into other regions is a common strategy of fishers and fishworkers living and working on the coast to adapt to environmental change. This model attempts to understand the general dynamics of fisher mobility for over larger spatial scales. The model can be used for investigating the complex interplay that exists between mobility and fish stock heterogeneity across regions, and the associated outcomes of mobility at the system level. The model...

Precipitation-catchment aquatic C emissions

Sivakiruthika Natchimuthu, Markus B. Wallin, Leif Klemedtsson, Patrick Crill & David Bastviken

Maps of northern peatland extent, depth, carbon storage and nitrogen storage

Gustaf Hugelius, Julie Loisel, Sarah Chadburn, Robert B. Jackson, Miriam Jones, Glen MacDonald, Maija Marushchak, David Olefeldt, Maara Packalen, Matthias B. Siewert, Claire Treat, Merritt Turestsky, Carolina Voigt & Zicheng Yu
This dataset is grids of peatland extent, peat depth, peatland organic carbon storage, peatland total nitrogen storage and approximate extent of ombrotrophic/minerotrophic peatlands. The grids are geotiff files in 10 km pixel resolution projected in the World Azimuthal Equidistant projection. Note that the peat depth grid shows potential peat depth everywhere,also where there is no peatland cover. For files on peatland organic carbon, total nitrogen extent and extent of ombrotrophic/minerotrophic peatlands, there are separate files...

Structural plasticity of olfactory neuropils in relation to insect diapause

Maertha Eriksson, Niklas Janz, Sören Nylin & Mikael A Carlsson
1. Many insects that live in temperate zones spend the cold season in a state of dormancy, referred to as diapause. As the insect must rely on resources that were gathered before entering diapause, keeping a low metabolic rate is of utmost importance. Organs that are metabolically expensive to maintain, such as the brain, can therefore become a liability to survival if they are too large. 2. Insects that go through diapause as adults generally...

Data from: Heterospecific mating interactions as an interface between ecology and evolution

Daisuke Kyogoku & David Wheatcroft
Reproductive interference (costly interspecific sexual interactions) are well-understood to promote divergence in mating-relevant traits (i.e. reproductive character displacement: RCD), but it can also reduce population growth, eventually leading to local extinction of one of the species. The ecological and evolutionary processes driven by reproductive interference can interact with each other. These interactions are likely to influence whether the outcome is co-existence or extinction, but remain little studied. In this paper, we first develop an eco-evolutionary...

Linked-read sequencing enables haplotype-resolved resequencing at population scale

Dave Lutgen, Raphael Ritter, Remi-Andre Olsen, Holger Schielzeth, Joel Gruselius, Philip Ewels, Jesús García, Hadoram Shirihai, Manuel Schweizer, Alexander Suh & Reto Burri
The feasibility to sequence entire genomes of virtually any organism provides unprecedented insights into the evolutionary history of populations and species. Nevertheless, many population genomic inferences – including the quantification and dating of admixture, introgression and demographic events, and inference of selective sweeps – are still limited by the lack of high-quality haplotype information. The newest generation of sequencing technology now promises significant progress. To establish the feasibility of haplotype-resolved genome resequencing at population scale,...

In-plate toxicometabolomics of single zebrafish embryos

Anton Ribbenstedt, Malte Posselt, Carl Brunius & Jonathan P. Benskin
Toxicometabolomic studies involving zebrafish embryos have become increasingly popular for linking apical endpoints to biochemical perturbations as part of adverse outcome pathway determination. These experiments involve pooling embryos to generate sufficient biomass for metabolomic measurement, which adds both time and cost. To address this limitation, we developed a high-throughput toxicometabolomic assay involving single zebrafish embryos. Incubation, microscopy, embryo extraction, and instrumental metabolomic analysis were all performed in the same 96-well plate, following acquisition of conventional...

Seminal fluid protein divergence among populations exhibiting postmating prezygotic reproductive isolation

Martin Garlovsky, Caroline Evans, Matthew A. Rosenow, Timothy L. Karr & Rhonda R. Snook
Despite holding a central role for fertilisation success, reproductive traits often show elevated rates of evolution and diversification. The rapid evolution of seminal fluid proteins (Sfps) within populations is predicted to cause mis-signalling between the male ejaculate and female reproductive tract between populations resulting in postmating prezygotic (PMPZ) isolation. Crosses between populations of Drosophila montana show PMPZ isolation in the form of reduced fertilisation success in both noncompetitive and competitive contexts. Here we test whether...

Field evidence for colour mimicry overshadowing morphological mimicry

David Outomuro, Alberto Corral-Lopez, Javier Edo Varg, Yiselle P. Cano-Cobos, Rafael Losada & Emilio Realpe
1. Imperfect mimicry may be maintained when the various components of an aposematic signal have different salience for predators. Experimental laboratory studies provide robust evidence for this phenomenon. Yet, evidence from natural settings remains scarce. 2. We studied how natural bird predators assess multiple features in a multicomponent aposematic signal in the Neotropical “clear wing complex” mimicry ring, dominated by glasswing butterflies. 3. We evaluated two components of the aposematic signal, wing colouration and wing...

Male-male behavioral interactions drive social-dominance mediated differences in ejaculate traits

Charel Reuland, Brett M. Culbert, Erika Fernlund Isaksson, Ariel F. Kahrl, Alessandro Devigili & John L. Fitzpatrick
Higher social status is expected to result in fitness benefits as it secures access to potential mates. In promiscuous species, male reproductive success is also determined by an individual’s ability to compete for fertilization after mating by producing high quality ejaculates. However, the complex relationship between a male’s investment in social status and ejaculates remains unclear. Here we examine how male social status influences ejaculate quality under a range of social contexts in the pygmy...

Methane emission and sulfide levels increase in tropical seagrass sediments during temperature stress: a mesocosm experiment

Mats Björk, Rushingisha George, Martin Gullström, Thomas J. Lyimo & Matern S.P. Mtolera
Climate change-induced ocean warming is expected to greatly affect carbon dynamics and sequestration in vegetated shallow waters, especially in the upper subtidal where water temperatures may fluctuate considerably and can reach high levels at low tides. This might alter the greenhouse gas balance and significantly reduce the carbon sink potential of tropical seagrass meadows. In order to assess such consequences, we simulated temperature stress during low tide exposures by subjecting seagrass plants (Thalassia hemprichii) and...

Redesigning distance courses to support social and teaching presence in adult and upper secondary education

Charlotta Hilli & Anna Åkerfeldt

Data for: Low predictability of energy balance traits and leaf temperature metrics in desert, montane, and alpine plant communities

Benjamin Blonder, Sabastian Escobar, Rozália Kapás & Sean Michaletz
Leaf energy balance may influence plant performance and community composition. While biophysical theory can link leaf energy balance to many traits and environment variables, predicting leaf temperature and key driver traits with incomplete parameterizations remains challenging. Predicting thermal offsets (δ, Tleaf – Tair difference) or thermal coupling strengths (β, Tleaf vs. Tair slope) is challenging. We ask: 1) whether environmental gradients predict variation in energy balance traits (absorptance, leaf angle, stomatal distribution, maximum stomatal conductance,...

The effects of functional response and host abundance fluctuations on genetic rescue in parasitoids with single-locus sex determination

Etsuko Nonaka & Veijo Kaitala
Many parasitoids have single-locus complementary sex determination (sl-CSD), which produces sterile or inviable males when homozygous at the sex determining locus. A previous study theoretically showed that small populations have elevated risks of extinction due to positive feedback between inbreeding and small population size, referred to as the diploid male vortex. A few modeling studies have suggested that the diploid male vortex may not be as common because balancing selection at sex determining loci tends...

Bayesian inference of ancestral host-parasite interactions under a phylogenetic model of host repertoire evolution

Mariana P. Braga, Michael J. Landis, Sören Nylin, Niklas Janz & Fredrik Ronquist
Intimate ecological interactions, such as those between parasites and their hosts, may persist over long time spans, coupling the evolutionary histories of the lineages involved. Most methods that reconstruct the coevolutionary history of such interactions make the simplifying assumption that parasites have a single host. Many methods also focus on congruence between host and parasite phylogenies, using cospeciation as the null model. However, there is an increasing body of evidence suggesting that the host ranges...

Nitrogen isotope composition of amino acids reveals trophic partitioning in two sympatric amphipods

Matias Ledesma, Elena Gorokhova, Henry Holmstrand, Andrius Garbas & Agnes Karlson
According to ecological theory two species cannot occupy the same niche. We tested the extent to which two sympatric deposit-feeding amphipods, Monoporeia affinis and Pontoporeia femorata, partition trophic resources by applying nitrogen isotope analyses (δ15N) of amino acids. We found that trophic position (TP), and resynthesis index (∑V; a proxy for degradation status of ingested material prior to assimilation by the consumer) differ between species. The surface-feeding M. affinis had higher TP and intermediate ∑V;...

Data from: Fire and grazing controlling a tropical tree line: Effects of long‐term grazing exclusion in Bale Mountains, Ethiopia

Maria Ulrika Johansson & Anders Granström
Aims: Tropical tree lines are often associated with abrupt shifts in vegetation, soils and disturbance regimes, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We analysed the role of grazing, fuels and fire in maintaining a sharp tree line with flammable heathland above non-flammable forest. Location: Bale Mountains, Ethiopia. Methods: Grazing exclosures, repeated vegetation sampling, soil analyses and burning and sowing experiments along an altitudinal gradient with Hagenia abyssinica forest, Erica trimera forest and Erica heathland;...

Data from: Nest attentiveness drives nest predation in arctic sandpipers

Nicolas Meyer, Loïc Bollache, François-Xavier Dechaume-Moncharmont, Jerôme Moreau, Eve Afonso, Anders Angerbjörn, Joël Bety, Dorothee Ehrich, Vladimir Gilg, Marie-Andrée Giroux, Jannik Hansen, Richard Lanctot, Johannes Lang, Nicolas Lecomte, Laura McKinnon, Jeroen Reneerkens, Sarah Saalfeld, Brigitte Sabard, Niels Schmidt, Benoît Sittler, Paul Smith, Aleksandr Sokolov, Vasiliy Sokolov, Natalya Sokolova, Rob Van Bemmelen … & Olivier Gilg
Most birds incubate their eggs to allow embryo development. This behaviour limits the ability of adults to perform other activities. Hence, incubating adults trade-off incubation and nest protection with foraging to meet their own needs. Parents can either cooperate to sustain this trade-off or incubate alone. The main cause of reproductive failure at this reproductive stage is predation and adults reduce this risk by keeping the nest location secret. Arctic sandpipers are interesting biological models...

Brain size and life history variables in birds

Dante Jiménez-Ortega, Niclas Kolm, Simone Immler, Alexei A. Maklakov & Alejandro González-Voyer
The database contains information on brain size, body mass, life-history traits and development mode for a total of 620 bird species. The taxonomy follows Jetz et. al. (2012). For life-history the database includes information for the following six variables: clutch size, egg size, incubation period, fledging age, maximum longevity; as well as development mode (altricial, semialtricial, precocial and semiprecocial). Additionally, in most cases there is information about the origin or the sampled specimen (captivity vs...

The role of low-grade inflammation in ME/CFS (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome) - associations with symptoms

Anna Andreasson, Martin Jonsjö, Gunnar Olsson, Rikard K Wicksell, Kjell Alving & Linda Holmström
Background Patients with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) often present with a range of flu-like symptoms resembling sickness behavior as well as widespread pain and concentration deficits. The aim of this study was to explore the association between inflammatory markers previously shown to be related to fatigue severity in ME/CFS and common ME/CFS symptoms post-exertional fatigue, impaired cognitive processing, musculoskeletal pain and recurrent flu-like symptoms, and the moderating effect of sex on these associations. Methods...

Temporal and spatial changes in benthic invertebrate trophic networks along a salinity gradient

Julie Garrison, Marie C. Nordström, Jan Albertsson & Francisco J. A. Nascimento
Species interactions underlie all ecosystem goods and services and are important for understanding ecosystem changes. Representing one type of species interaction, trophic networks are able to be constructed from biodiversity monitoring data and known trophic links to understand how ecosystems have changed over time. The Baltic Sea is subject to high anthropogenic pressures, and its low species diversity makes it an ideal candidate for understanding how pressures change food webs. In this study, we used...

Data for the effect of optic flow cues on honeybee flight control in wind

Emily Baird, Norbert Boeddeker & Mandyam Srinivasan
To minimise the risk of colliding with the ground or other obstacles, flying animals need to control both their ground speed and ground height. This task is particularly challenging in wind, where head winds require an animal to increase its airspeed to maintain a constant ground speed and tail winds may generate negative airspeeds, rendering flight more difficult to control. In this study, we investigate how head and tail winds affect flight control in the...

Data from: Female sperm storage mediates postcopulatory costs and benefits of ejaculate anticipatory plasticity in the guppy

Alessandro Devigili, Gabriela Cardozo, Pietro Antonelli & Andrea Pilastro
Males of many species evolved the capability of adjusting their ejaculate phenotype in response to social cues to match the expected mating conditions. When females store sperm for prolonged time, the expected fitness return of plastic adjustments of ejaculate phenotype may depend on the interval between mating and fertilization. While, prolonged female sperm storage (FSS) increases the opportunity for sperm competition, as a consequence of the longer temporal overlapping of ejaculates from several males, it...

Comparative analysis of larval growth in Lepidoptera reveals instar-level constraints

Sami Kivelä, Robert Davis, Toomas Esperk, Karl Gotthard, Marko Mutanen, Daniel Valdma & Toomas Tammaru
1. Juvenile growth trajectories evolve via the interplay of selective pressures on age and size at maturity, and developmental constraints. In insects, the moulting cycle is a major constraint on larval growth trajectories. 2. Surface area to volume ratio of a larva decreases during growth, so renewal of certain surfaces by moulting is likely needed for the maintenance of physiological efficiency. A null hypothesis of isometry, implied by Dyar’s Rule, would mean that the relative...

Compensating for climate change-induced cue-environment mismatches: evidence for contemporary evolution of a photoperiodic reaction norm in Colias butterflies

Matthew Nielsen & Joel Kingsolver
Anthropogenic climate change alters seasonal conditions without altering photoperiod and can thus create a cue-environment mismatch for organisms that use photoperiod as a cue for seasonal plasticity. We investigated whether evolution of the photoperiodic reaction norm has compensated for this mismatch in Colias eurytheme. This butterfly’s wing melanization has a thermoregulatory function and changes seasonally. In 1971, Hoffmann quantified how larval photoperiod determines adult wing melanization. We recreated his experiment 47 years later using a...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    52

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    49
  • Other
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  • Software
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  • Text
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Affiliations

  • Stockholm University
    52
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    5
  • Lund University
    4
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • University of Montreal
    2
  • University of Picardie Jules Verne
    2
  • University of Freiburg
    2
  • University of Manchester
    2
  • University of Sao Paulo
    2
  • University of British Columbia
    2