24 Works

Data from: Environment not dispersal limitation drives clonal composition of arctic Daphnia in a recently deglaciated area

Tsegazeabe Hadush Haileselasie, Joachim Mergeay, Lawrence J. Weider, Ruben Sommaruga, Thomas A. Davidson, Mariana Meerhoff, Hartmut Arndt, Klaus Jürgens, Erik Jeppesen & Luc De Meester
One of the most prominent manifestations of the ongoing climate warming is the retreat of glaciers and ice sheets around the world. Retreating glaciers result in the formation of new ponds and lakes, which are available for colonization. The gradual appearance of these new habitat patches allows us to determine to what extent the composition of asexual Daphnia (water flea) populations is affected by environmental drivers versus dispersal limitation. Here we used a landscape genetics...

Data from: Understanding past population dynamics: Bayesian coalescent-based modeling with covariates

Mandev S. Gill, Philippe Lemey, Shannon N. Bennett, Roman Biek & Marc A. Suchard
Effective population size characterizes the genetic variability in a population and is a parameter of paramount importance in population genetics and evolutionary biology. Kingman's coalescent process enables inference of past population dynamics directly from molecular sequence data, and researchers have developed a number of flexible coalescent-based models for Bayesian nonparametric estimation of the effective population size as a function of time. Major goals of demographic reconstruction include identifying driving factors of effective population size, and...

Data from: Integrating the pace-of-life syndrome across species, sexes and individuals: covariation of life history and personality under pesticide exposure

Sara Debecker, Iago Sanmartín-Villar, Miguel De Guinea-Luengo, Adolfo Cordero-Rivera & Robby Stoks
The pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis integrates covariation of life-history traits along a fast–slow continuum and covariation of behavioural traits along a proactive–reactive personality continuum. Few studies have investigated these predicted life-history/personality associations among species and between sexes. Furthermore, whether and how contaminants interfere with POLS patterns remains unexplored. We tested for covariation patterns in life history and in behaviour, and for life-history/personality covariation among species, among individuals within species and between sexes. Moreover, we investigated...

Data from: Sex change and effective population size: implications for population genetic studies in marine fish

Ilaria Coscia, Julien Chopelet, Robin S. Waples, Bruce Mann & Stefano Mariani
Large variance in reproductive success is the primary factor that reduces effective population size (Ne) in natural populations. In sequentially hermaphroditic (sex-changing) fish, the sex ratio is typically skewed and biased towards the 'first' sex, while reproductive success increases considerably after sex change. Therefore, sex-changing fish populations are theoretically expected to have lower Ne than gonochorists (separate sexes), assuming all other parameters are essentially equal. In this study, we estimate Ne from genetic data collected...

Data from: Distinctive fungal communities in an obligate African ant-plant mutualism

Christopher C.M. Baker, Dino J. Martins, Julianne N. Pelaez, Johan P.J. Billen, Anne Pringle, Megan E. Frederickson, Naomi E. Pierce, Christopher C. M. Baker & Johan P. J. Billen
Three ant species nest obligately in the swollen-thorn domatia of the African ant-plant Vachellia (Acacia) drepanolobium, a model system for the study of ant-defence mutualisms and species coexistence. Here we report on the characteristic fungal communities generated by these ant species in their domatia. First, we describe behavioural differences between the ant species when presented with a cultured fungal isolate in the laboratory. Second, we use DNA metabarcoding to show that each ant species has...

Data from: Weak link between dispersal and parasite community differentiation or immunogenetic divergence in two sympatric cichlid fishes

Pascal I. Hablützel, Arnout F. Grégoir, Maarten P. M. Vanhove, Filip A. M. Volckaert & Joost A. M. Raeymaekers
Geographical isolation, habitat variation and trophic specialization have contributed to a large extent to the astonishing diversity of cichlid fishes in the Great East African lakes. Because parasite communities often vary across space and environments, parasites can accompany and potentially enhance cichlid species diversification. However, host dispersal may reduce opportunities for parasite-driven evolution by homogenizing parasite communities and allele frequencies of immunity genes. To test for the relationships between parasite community variation, host dispersal and...

Data from: Temporal genetic stability in natural populations of the waterflea Daphnia magna in response to strong selection pressure

Luisa Orsini, Hollie Marshall, Maria Cuenca Cambronero, Anurag Chaturvedi, Kelley W. Thomas, Michael E. Pfrender, Katina I. Spanier & Luc De Meester
Studies monitoring changes in genetic diversity and composition through time allow a unique understanding of evolutionary dynamics and persistence of natural populations. However, such studies are often limited to species with short generation times that can be propagated in the laboratory or few exceptional cases in the wild. Species that produce dormant stages provide powerful models for the reconstruction of evolutionary dynamics in the natural environment. A remaining open question is to what extent dormant...

Data from: Microbial diversity in the floral nectar of Linaria vulgaris along an urbanization gradient

Jacek Bartlewicz, Bart Lievens, Olivier Honnay & Jacquemyn Hans
Background: Microbes are common inhabitants of floral nectar and are capable of influencing plant-pollinator interactions. All studies so far investigated microbial communities in floral nectar in plant populations that were located in natural environments, but nothing is known about these communities in nectar of plants inhabiting urban environments. However, at least some microbes are vectored into floral nectar by pollinators, and because urbanization can have a profound impact on pollinator communities and plant-pollinator interactions, it...

Data from: 1970s and ‘Patient 0’ HIV-1 genomes illuminate early HIV/AIDS history in North America

Michael Worobey, Thomas D. Watts, Richard A. McKay, Marc A. Suchard, Timothy Granade, Dirk E. Teuwen, Beryl A. Koblin, Walid Heneine, Philippe Lemey & Harold W. Jaffe
The emergence of HIV-1 group M subtype B in North American men who have sex with men was a key turning point in the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Phylogenetic studies have suggested cryptic subtype B circulation in the United States (US) throughout the 1970s1, 2 and an even older presence in the Caribbean2. However, these temporal and geographical inferences, based upon partial HIV-1 genomes that postdate the recognition of AIDS in 1981, remain contentious3, 4 and the...

Data from: Metabolic adaptations in a range-expanding arthropod

Katrien H. P. Van Petegem, David Renault, Robby Stoks & Dries Bonte
Despite an increasing number of studies documenting life-history evolution during range expansions or shifts, we lack a mechanistic understanding of the underlying physiological processes. In this explorative study, we used a metabolomics approach to study physiological changes associated with the recent range expansion of the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae). Mite populations were sampled along a latitudinal gradient from range core to edge and reared under benign common garden conditions for two generations. Using gas...

Data from: A test of priority effect persistence in semi-natural grasslands through the removal of plant functional groups during community assembly

Kenny Helsen, Martin Hermy & Olivier Honnay
Background: It is known that during plant community assembly, the early colonizing species can affect the establishment, growth or reproductive success of later arriving species, often resulting in unpredictable assembly outcomes. These so called ‘priority effects’ have recently been hypothesized to work through niche-based processes, with early colonizing species either inhibiting the colonization of other species of the same niche through niche preemption, or affecting the colonization success of species of different niches through niche...

Data from: Sylleptic branching in winter-headed apple (Malus × domestica) trees: accession-dependent responses and their relationships with other tree architectural characteristics

Stijn Vanderzande, Niek Hias, Daniel Edge-Garza, Evelyne Costes, Mark W. Davey & Johan Keulemans
Well-feathered apple trees are essential for commercial orchards to optimize yields. However, most cultivars do not form these sylleptic branches readily in commercial nurseries due to high apical dominance. Several treatments exist to promote their formation in the nurseries, one of which is heading. However, not all cultivars are expected to react similarly to these treatments. We studied the branching response of 155 genotypes following heading and its relation to other architectural traits as a...

Data from: Heritable variation in maternally-derived yolk androgens, thyroid hormones and immune factors

Suvi Ruuskanen, Phillip Gienapp, Ton G.G Groothuis, Sonja V. Schaper, Veerle M. Darras, Cheyenne Pereira, Bonnie De Vries & Marcel E. Visser
Maternal reproductive investment can critically influence offspring phenotype, and thus these maternal effects are expected to be under strong natural selection. Knowledge on the extent of heritable variation in the physiological mechanisms underlying maternal effects is however limited. In birds, resource allocation to eggs is a key mechanism for mothers to affect their offspring and different components of the egg may or may not be independently adjusted. We studied the heritability of egg components and...

Data from: The effect of demographic correlations on the stochastic population dynamics of perennial plants

Aldo Compagnoni, Andrew J. Bibian, Brad M. Ochocki, Haldre S. Rogers, Emily L. Schultz, Michelle E. Sneck, Bret D. Elderd, Amy M. Iler, David W. Inouye, Hans Jacquemyn, Tom E.X. Miller & Tom E. X. Miller
Understanding the influence of environmental variability on population dynamics is a fundamental goal of ecology. Theory suggests that, for populations in variable environments, temporal correlations between demographic vital rates (e.g., growth, survival, reproduction) can increase (if positive) or decrease (if negative) the variability of year-to-year population growth. Because this variability generally decreases long-term population viability, vital rate correlations may importantly affect population dynamics in stochastic environments. Despite long-standing theoretical interest, it is unclear whether vital...

Data from: The origin of floral organ identity quartets

Philip Ruelens, Zhicheng Zhang, Hilda Van Mourik, Steven Maere, Kerstin Kaufmann & Koen Geuten
The origin of flowers has puzzled plant biologists ever since Darwin referred to their sudden appearance in the fossil record as an abominable mystery. Flowers are considered to be an assembly of protective, attractive and reproductive male and female leaf-like organs. Their origin cannot be understood by a morphological comparison to gymnosperms, their closest relatives, which develop separate male or female cones. Despite these morphological differences, gymnosperms and angiosperms possess a similar genetic toolbox consisting...

Data from: Evolution determines how global warming and pesticide exposure will shape predator–prey interactions with vector mosquitoes

Tam T. Tran, Lizanne Janssens, Khuong V. Dinh, Lin Op De Beeck & Robby Stoks
How evolution may mitigate the effects of global warming and pesticide exposure on predator–prey interactions is directly relevant for vector control. Using a space-for-time substitution approach, we addressed how 4°C warming and exposure to the pesticide endosulfan shape the predation on Culex pipiens mosquitoes by damselfly predators from replicated low- and high-latitude populations. Although warming was only lethal for the mosquitoes, it reduced predation rates on these prey. Possibly, under warming escape speeds of the...

Data from: The influence of balanced and imbalanced resource supply on biodiversity-functioning relationship across ecosystems

Aleksandra M. Lewandowska, Antje Biermann, Elizabeth T. Borer, Miguel A. Cebrian-Piqueras, Steven A. J. Declerck, Luc De Meester, Ellen Van Donk, Lars Gamfeldt, Daniel S. Gruner, Nicole Hagenah, W. Stanley Harpole, Kevin P. Kirkman, Christopher A. Klausmeier, Michael Kleyer, Johannes M. H. Knops, Pieter Lemmens, Eric M. Lind, Elena Litchman, Jasmin Mantilla-Contreras, Koen Martens, Sandra Meier, Vanessa Minden, Joslin L. Moore, Harry Olde Venterink, Eric W. Seabloom … & Helmut Hillebrand
Numerous studies show that increasing species richness leads to higher ecosystem productivity. This effect is often attributed to more efficient portioning of multiple resources in communities with higher numbers of competing species, indicating the role of resource supply and stoichiometry for biodiversity–ecosystem functioning relationships. Here, we merged theory on ecological stoichiometry with a framework of biodiversity–ecosystem functioning to understand how resource use transfers into primary production. We applied a structural equation model to define patterns...

Data from: Selection mosaics differentiate Rhizobium–host plant interactions across different nitrogen environments

Jannick Van Cauwenberghe, Wouter Visch, Jan Michiels & Olivier Honnay
The nature and direction of coevolutionary interactions between species is expected to differentiate among distinct environments. Consequently, locally coevolved symbiotic traits would be well matched in similar environments, but mismatched elsewhere. In a classic mutualistic tradeoff, rhizobia provide nitrogen (N) to legume host plants in return for photosynthates. Despite earlier predictions, there is little evidence so far that spatial differences in soil N content mediate the coevolutionary outcome of the legume–Rhizobium mutualism. To test the...

Data from: Energy storage and fecundity explain deviations from ecological stoichiometry predictions under global warming and size-selective predation

Chao Zhang, Mieke Jansen, Luc De Meester & Robby Stoks
A key challenge for ecologists is to predict how single and joint effects of global warming and predation risk translate from the individual level up to ecosystem functions. Recently, stoichiometric theory linked these levels through changes in body stoichiometry, predicting that both higher temperatures and predation risk induce shifts in energy storage (increases in C-rich carbohydrates and reductions in N-rich proteins) and body stoichiometry (increases in C : N and C : P). This promising...

Data from: Rapid evolution of antioxidant defense in a natural population of Daphnia magna

Sarah Oexle, Mieke Jansen, Kevin Pauwels, Ruben Sommaruga, Luc De Meester & Robby Stoks
Natural populations can cope with rapid changes in stressors by relying on sets of physiological defense mechanisms. Little is known onto what extent these physiological responses reflect plasticity and/or genetic adaptation, evolve in the same direction and result in an increased defense ability. Using resurrection ecology, we studied how a natural Daphnia magna population adjusted its antioxidant defense to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) during a period with increasing incident UVR reaching the water surface. We demonstrate...

Data from: NREM2 and sleep spindles are instrumental to the consolidation of motor sequence memories

Samuel Laventure, Stuart Fogel, Ovidiu Lungu, Geneviève Albouy, Pénélope Sévigny-Dupont, Catherine Vien, Chadi Sayour, Julie Carrier, Habib Benali & Julien Doyon
Although numerous studies have convincingly demonstrated that sleep plays a critical role in motor sequence learning (MSL) consolidation, the specific contribution of the different sleep stages in this type of memory consolidation is still contentious. To probe the role of stage 2 non-REM sleep (NREM2) in this process, we used a conditioning protocol in three different groups of participants who either received an odor during initial training on a motor sequence learning task and were...

Data from: Posterior parietal cortex drives inferotemporal activations during three-dimensional object vision

Ilse C. Van Dromme, Elsie Premereur, Bram-Ernst Verhoef, Wim Vanduffel & Peter Janssen
The primate visual system consists of a ventral stream, specialized for object recognition, and a dorsal visual stream, which is crucial for spatial vision and actions. However, little is known about the interactions and information flow between these two streams. We investigated these interactions within the network processing three-dimensional (3D) object information, comprising both the dorsal and ventral stream. Reversible inactivation of the macaque caudal intraparietal area (CIP) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) reduced...

Data from: Origins of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in swine in Mexico

Ignacio Mena, Martha I. Nelson, Francisco Quezada-Monroy, Jayeeta Dutta, Refugio Cortes-Fernández, J. Horacio Lara-Puente, Felipa Castro-Peralta, Luis F. Cunha, Nídia Sequeira-Trovão, Bernardo Lozano-Dubernard, Andrew Rambaut, Harm Van Bakel & Adolfo García-Sastre
Asia is considered an important source of influenza A virus (IAV) pandemics, owing to large, diverse viral reservoirs in poultry and swine. However, the zoonotic origins of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus (pdmH1N1) remain unclear, due to conflicting evidence from swine and humans. There is strong evidence that the first human outbreak of pdmH1N1 occurred in Mexico in early 2009. However, no related swine viruses have been detected in Mexico or any part of...

Data from: Biodiversity as insurance for sapling survival in experimental tree plantations

Thomas Van De Peer, Kris Verheyen, Lander Baeten, Quentin Ponette & Bart Muys
Biodiversity can insure ecosystems against declines in their functioning by increasing the mean level of ecosystem processes and decreasing the spatial or temporal variance of these processes. On this basis, mixing tree species is expected to be an effective management strategy to reduce the risk of planting failure in young plantations. We examined the effects of biodiversity insurance on sapling survival in three tree diversity experiments across Belgium. Based on the survival scoring of 89...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    24

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    24

Affiliations

  • KU Leuven
    24
  • Ghent University
    3
  • Aarhus University
    2
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    2
  • University of Maryland, College Park
    2
  • University of Innsbruck
    2
  • Vrije Universiteit Brussel
    1
  • Rice University
    1
  • Columbia University
    1
  • Research Institute for Nature and Forest
    1