198 Works

The importance of environmental conditions in maintaining lineage identity in Epithelantha (Cactaceae)

Alejandra Moreno-Letelier, David Aquino, Miguel A. González-Botello, Salvador Arias, Alejandra Moreno‐Letelier & Miguel A. González‐Botello
The use of environmental variables to explain the evolution of lineages has gained relevance in recent studies. Additionally, it has allowed the recognition of species by adding more characters to morphological and molecular information. This study focuses on identifying environmental and landscape variables that have acted as barriers that could have influenced the evolution of Epithelantha species and its close genera. Our results show that soil pH, isothermality, temperature seasonality, and annual precipitation have a...

Patterns, predictors, and consequence of dominance in hybrids

Kenneth Thompson, Mackenzie Urquhart-Cronish, Kenneth D. Whitney, Loren H. Rieseberg & Dolph Schluter
Compared to those of their parents, are the traits of first-generation (F1) hybrids typically intermediate, biased toward one parent, or mismatched for alternative parental phenotypes? And how does hybrid trait expression affect fitness? To address this empirical gap, we compiled data from 198 studies in which traits were measured in a common environment for two parent taxa and their F1 hybrids. We find that individual traits in F1s are, on average, halfway between the parental...

Data from: The sensitivity of Neotoma to climate change and biodiversity loss over the late Quaternary

Catalina P. Tome, S. Kathleen Lyons, Seth D. Newsome & Felisa A. Smith
The late Quaternary was a time of considerable environmental change in North America. Not only was climate highly variable, but a megafaunal extinction at the terminal Pleistocene led to considerable loss of biodiversity. These combined perturbations likely had cascading effects across communities and ecosystems. Here, we focus on a detailed fossil record on the Edwards Plateau in Texas and the response of Neotoma, a genus of herbivorous rodents, to these environmental and ecological perturbations. We...

The invasion paradox dissolves when using phylogenetic and temporal perspectives

Adrienne Ernst, Rebecca Barak, Andrew Hipp, Andrea Kramer, Hannah Marx & Daniel Larkin
1. Elton’s prediction that higher biodiversity leads to denser niche-packing and thus higher community resistance to invasion has long been studied, with species richness as the predominant measure of diversity. However, few studies have explored how phylogenetic and functional diversity, which should represent niche space more faithfully than taxonomic diversity, influence community invasibility, especially across longer time frames and over larger spatial extents. 2. We used a 15-year, 150-site grassland dataset to assess relationships between...

Repository Analytics and Metrics Portal (RAMP) 2019 data

Jonathan Wheeler & Kenning Arlitsch
Version update: The originally uploaded versions of the CSV files in this dataset included an extra column, "Unnamed: 0," which is not RAMP data and was an artifact of the process used to export the data to CSV format. This column has been removed from the revised dataset. The data are otherwise the same as in the first version. The Repository Analytics and Metrics Portal (RAMP) is a web service that aggregates use and performance...

A phylogeny of white-eyes based on ultraconserved elements

Michael Andersen, Carl Oliveros & Robert Moyle
White-eyes are an iconic radiation of passerine birds that have been the subject of studies in evolutionary biology, biogeography, and speciation theory. Zosterops white-eyes in particular are thought to have radiated rapidly across continental and insular regions of the Afro- and Indo-Pacific tropics, yet, their phylogenetic history remains equivocal. Here, we sampled 77% of the genera and 47% of known white-eye species and sequenced thousands of ultraconserved elements to infer the phylogeny of the avian...

Ciudad Juárez, ‘ni exótica ni emocionante’: (Re)memoración de las víctimas desde los espacios de violencia en la poesía de Arminé Arjona y Carmen Julia Holguín Chaparro

Ana Gabriela Hernández González
pp. 61-75. This article explores how Arminé Arjona and Carmen Julia Holguín Chaparro –poets from Chihuahua– use poetry to recover voices of victims and to resist violence in Ciudad Juárez. Both authors appropriate spaces of violence and (re)memorize them as a sites of victims memory. Thus, these authors include versions of victims in Juarez cultural memory through their poems. Spaces of violence, used by Arjona´s and Holguín Chaparro´s poetry, are physical, symbolic, and metaphorical (Seydel...

Supporting data for increasing fire activity reinforces shrub conversion in Southwestern US forests

Matthew Hurteau, Alisa Keyser, Dan Krofcheck, Cecile Remy & Craig Allen
Fire-exclusion in historically frequent-fire forests of the southwestern United States has altered forest structure and increased the probability of high-severity fire. Warmer and drier conditions, coupled with dispersal distance limitations are limiting tree seedling establishment and survival following high-severity fire. Post-fire conversion to non-forest vegetation can be reinforced by subsequent fire events. We sought to determine the influence of fire probability on post-fire vegetation development in a severely burned landscape in New Mexico, USA. We...

Parachute geckos free fall into synonymy: Gekko phylogeny, and a new subgeneric classification, inferred from thousands of ultraconserved elements

Perry Wood, Xianguang Guo, Scott Travers, Yong-Chao Su, Karen Olson, Aaron Bauer, Lee Grismer, Cameron Siler, Robert Moyle, Michael Andersen & Rafe Brown
Recent phylogenetic studies of gekkonid lizards have revealed unexpected, widespread paraphyly and polyphyly among genera, unclear generic boundaries, and a tendency towards the nesting of taxa exhibiting specialized, apomorphic morphologies within geographically widespread “generalist” clades. This is especially true in Australasia, where monophyly of Gekko proper has been questioned with respect to phenotypically ornate flap-legged geckos of the genus Luperosaurus, the Philippine false geckos of the genus Pseudogekko, and even the elaborately “derived” parachute geckos...

Taxon pulse dynamics, episodic dispersal, and host colonization across Beringia drive diversification of a holarctic tapeworm assemblage

Genevieve Haas, Eric Hoberg, Joseph Cook, Heikki Henttonen, Arseny Makarikov, Sarah Gallagher, Nikolai Dokuchaev & Kurt Galbreath
Aim: We test the predictions of the Stockholm Paradigm, a synthesis of eco-evolutionary theory explaining the nature of faunal assembly, host range and parasite diversification. Faunal diversification and assembly, manifested in patterns of host colonization, co-adaptation and parasite speciation, is predicted to emerge as a consequence of alternating episodes of ecological disruption and stability. Specifically, for a diverse cestode genus (Arostrilepis), we evaluate the number and direction of Pleistocene dispersal events across Beringia, the number...

Intraspecific variation and energy channel coupling within a Chilean kelp forest

Emma Elliott Smith, Chris Harrod, Felipe Docmac, Seth Newsome & Emma Elliott Smith
The widespread importance of variable types of primary production, or energy channels, to consumer communities has become increasingly apparent. However, the mechanisms underlying this ‘multichannel’ feeding remain poorly understood, especially for aquatic ecosystems that pose unique logistical constraints given the diversity of potential energy channels. Here, we use bulk tissue isotopic analysis along with carbon isotope (δ13C) analysis of individual amino acids to characterize the relative contribution of pelagic and benthic energy sources to a...

Data from: Extensive hybridization between two Andean warbler species with shallow divergence in mtDNA

Laura Céspedes-Arias, Andrés Cuervo, Elisa Bonaccorso, Marialejandra Castro-Farias, Alejandro Mendoza-Santacruz, Jorge Pérez-Emán, Christopher Witt & Daniel Cadena
Studying processes acting on differentiated populations upon secondary contact, such as hybridization, is important to comprehensively understand how species are formed and maintained over time. However, avian speciation studies in the tropical Andes have largely focused on the role of topographic and ecological barriers promoting divergence in allopatry, seldom examining hybridization and introgression. We describe a hybrid zone involving 2 closely related Andean warblers (Parulidae), the Golden-fronted Redstart (Myioborus ornatus) and the Spectacled Redstart (Myioborus...

Supporting Data To: Shark tooth collagen stable isotopes (δ15N and δ13C) as ecological proxies

Oliver Shipley, Gregory Henkes, James Gelsleichter, Clark Morgan, Eric Schneider, Brendan Talwar & Michael Frisk
The isotopic composition of tooth-bound collagen has long been used to reconstruct dietary patterns of animals in extant and paleoecological systems. For sharks that replace teeth rapidly in a conveyor-like system, stable isotopes of tooth collagen (δ13Ctooth & δ15Ntooth) are poorly understood and lacking in ecological context relative to other non-lethally sampled tissues. This tissue holds promise, because shark jaws may preserve isotopic chronologies from which to infer individual-level ecological patterns across a range of...

Data from: Interannual variations in needle and sapwood traits of Pinus edulis branches under an experimental drought

Marceau Guerin, Dario Martin-Benito, Georg Von Arx, Laia Andreu Hayles, Kevin L. Griffin, Rayann Hamdan, Nate G. McDowell, Robert Muscarella, Will Pockman, Pierre Gentine, William Pockman & Laia Andreu-Hayles
1) In the Southwest United States, recent large-scale die-offs of conifers raise the question of their resilience and mortality under droughts. To date, little is known about the interannual structural response to droughts. 2) We hypothesized that piñon pines (Pinus edulis) respond to drought by reducing the drop of leaf water potential in branches from year to year through needle morphological adjustments. We tested our hypothesis using a seven-year experiment in central New Mexico with...

Data from: Divergence-with-gene-flow within the recent chipmunk radiation (Tamias)

Jack Sullivan, John R. Demboski, Kayce C. Bell, Sarah Hird, Noah Reid, Brice Sarver & Jeffrey M. Good
Increasing data have supported the importance of divergence with gene flow (DGF) in the generation of biological diversity. In such cases, lineage divergence occurs on a shorter timescale than does the completion of reproductive isolation. Although it is critical to explore the mechanisms driving divergence and preventing homogenization by hybridization, it is equally important to document cases of DGF in nature. Here we synthesize data that have accumulated over the last dozen or so years...

Data from: Rensch's rule in large herbivorous mammals derived from metabolic scaling

Richard M. Sibly, Wenyun Zuo, Astrid Kodric-Brown & James H. Brown
Rensch’s rule, which states that the magnitude of sexual size dimorphism tends to increase with increasing body size, has evolved independently in three lineages of large herbivorous mammals: bovids (antelopes), cervids (deer), and macropodids (kangaroos). This pattern can be explained by a model that combines allometry, life-history theory, and energetics. The key features are that female group size increases with increasing body size and that males have evolved under sexual selection to grow large enough...

Data from: The utility of CAD in recovering Gondwanan vicariance events and the evolutionary history of Aciliini (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)

Rasa Bukontaite, Kelly B. Miller & Johannes Bergsten
Background: Aciliini presently includes 69 species of medium-sized water beetles distributed on all continents except Antarctica. The pattern of distribution with several genera confined to different continents of the Southern Hemisphere raises the yet untested hypothesis of a Gondwana vicariance origin. The monophyly of Aciliini has been questioned with regard to Eretini, and there are competing hypotheses about the intergeneric relationship in the tribe. This study is the first comprehensive phylogenetic analysis focused on the...

Data from: Fitness decline under osmotic stress in Caenorhabditis elegans populations subjected to spontaneous mutation accumulation at varying population sizes

Vaishali Katju, Lucille Boreal Packard & Peter David Keightley
The consequences of mutations for population fitness depends on their individual selection coefficients and the effective population size. An earlier study of Caenorhabditis elegans spontaneous mutation accumulation lines evolved for 409 generations at three population sizes found that Ne = 1 populations declined significantly in fitness whereas the fitness of larger populations (Ne = 5, 50) was indistinguishable from the ancestral control under benign conditions. To test if larger MA populations harbor a load of...

Data from: Inclusive fitness and differential productivity across the life course determine intergenerational transfers in a small-scale human society

Paul L. Hooper, Michael Gurven, Jeffrey Winking & Hillard S. Kaplan
Transfers of resources between generations are an essential element in current models of human life-history evolution accounting for prolonged development, extended lifespan and menopause. Integrating these models with Hamilton's theory of inclusive fitness, we predict that the interaction of biological kinship with the age-schedule of resource production should be a key driver of intergenerational transfers. In the empirical case of Tsimane’ forager–horticulturalists in Bolivian Amazonia, we provide a detailed characterization of net transfers of food...

Data from: Spatio-temporal variation in parasite communities maintains diversity at the major histocompatibility complex class IIβ in the endangered Rio Grande Silvery Minnow

Megan J. Osborne, Tyler J. Pilger, Joel D. Lusk & Thomas F. Turner
Climate change will strongly impact aquatic ecosystems particularly in arid and semi-arid regions. Fish-parasite interactions will also be affected by predicted altered flow and temperature regimes, and other environmental stressors. Hence, identifying environmental and genetic factors associated with maintaining diversity at immune genes is critical for understanding species’ adaptive capacity. Here we combine genetic (MHC Class IIβ and microsatellites), parasitological and ecological data to explore the relationship between these factors in the remnant wild Rio...

Data from: Comparative riverscape genetics reveals reservoirs of genetic diversity for conservation and restoration of Great Plains fishes.

Megan J. Osborne, Joshuah S. Perkin, Keith B. Gido, Tom F. Turner & Thomas F. Turner
We used comparative landscape genetics to examine the relative roles of historical events, intrinsic traits, and landscape factors in determining the distribution of genetic diversity of river fishes across the North American Great Plains. Spatial patterns of diversity were overlaid on a patch-based graphical model, and then compared within and among three species that co-occurred across five Great Plains watersheds. Species differing in reproductive strategy (benthic vs. pelagic spawning) were hypothesized to have different patterns...

Data from: Phylogenetic patterns of trait and trait plasticity evolution: Insights from amphibian embryos

Rick Relyea, Patrick R. Stephens, Lisa N. Barrow, Andrew Blaustein, Paul Bradley, Julia Buck, Ann Chang, Brian I Crother, James Collins, Julia Earl, Stephanie S. Gervasi, Jason T. Hoverman, Olliver Hyman, Emily Claire Moriarty Lemmon, Thomas Luhring, Moses Michelsohn, Christopher M. Murray, Steven Price, Raymond Semlitsch, Andy Sih, Aaron Stoler, Nick VandenBroek, Alexa Warwick, Greta Wengert, John Hammond … & Aaron B. Stoler
Environmental variation favors the evolution of phenotypic plasticity. For many species, we understand the costs and benefits of different phenotypes, but we lack a broad understanding of how plastic traits evolve across large clades. Using identical experiments conducted across North America, we examined prey responses to predator cues. We quantified five life history traits and the magnitude of their plasticity for 23 amphibian species/populations (spanning three families and five genera) when exposed to no cues,...

Data from: Data management, archiving and sharing for biologists and the role of research institutions in the technology-oriented age

Sebastien Renaut, Amber E. Budden, Dominique Gravel, Timothée Poisot & Pedro Peres-Neto
Data are one of the primary outputs of science. Although certain sub-disciplines of biology have pioneered efforts to ensure their long-term preservation and facilitate collaborations, data continue to disappear, owing mostly to technological, regulatory and ideological hurdles. In this review, we describe the important steps towards proper data management and archiving, and provide a critical discussion on the importance of long term data conservation. We then illustrate the rise in data archiving through the Joint...

Data from: Characteristics and outcomes of women utilizing emergency medical services for third-trimester pregnancy-related complaints in India: a prospective observational study

Matthew C. Strehlow, Jennifer A. Newberry, Corey B. Bills, Hyeyoun Min, Ann E. Evensen, Lawrence Leeman, Elizabeth A. Pirrotta, G. V. Ramana Rao & S. V. Mahadevan
Objectives: Characterize the demographics, management, and outcomes of obstetric patients transported by emergency medical services (EMS). Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Five Indian states utilizing a centralized EMS agency that transported 3.1 million pregnant women in 2014. Participants: This study enrolled a convenience sample of 1684 women in third trimester of pregnancy calling with a “pregnancy-related” complaint for free-of-charge ambulance transport. Calls were deemed “pregnancy-related” if categorized by EMS dispatchers as “pregnancy”, “childbirth”, “miscarriage”, or...

Data from: Phylogenomics from whole genome sequences using aTRAM

Julie M. Allen, Bret Boyd, Nam-Phuong Nguyen, Pranjal Vachaspati, Tandy Warnow, Daisie I. Huang, Patrick G. S. Grady, Kayce C. Bell, Quentin C.B. Cronk, Lawrence Mugisha, Barry R. Pittendrigh, M. Soledad Leonardi, David L. Reed & Kevin P. Johnson
Novel sequencing technologies are rapidly expanding the size of data sets that can be applied to phylogenetic studies. Currently the most commonly used phylogenomic approaches involve some form of genome reduction. While these approaches make assembling phylogenomic data sets more economical for organisms with large genomes, they reduce the genomic coverage and thereby the long-term utility of the data. Currently, for organisms with moderate to small genomes (<1000 Mbp) it is feasible to sequence the...

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