9 Works

Data from: Isolation with asymmetric gene flow during the nonsynchronous divergence of dry forest birds

Jessica A. Oswald, Isaac Overcast, , Michael J. Andersen & Brian Tilston Smith
Dry forest bird communities in South America are often fragmented by intervening mountains and rainforests, generating high local endemism. The historical assembly of dry forest communities likely results from dynamic processes linked to numerous population histories among codistributed species. Nevertheless, species may diversify in the same way through time if landscape and environmental features, or species ecologies, similarly structure populations. Here we tested whether six co-distributed taxon pairs that occur in the dry forests of...

Data from: River network architecture, genetic effective size and distributional patterns predict differences in genetic structure across species in a dryland stream fish community

Tyler J. Pilger, Keith B. Gido, David L. Propst, James E. Whitney & Thomas F. Turner
Dendritic ecological network (DEN) architecture can be a strong predictor of spatial genetic patterns in theoretical and simulation studies. Yet, interspecific differences in dispersal capabilities and distribution within the network may equally affect species’ genetic structuring. We characterized patterns of genetic variation from up to ten microsatellite loci for nine numerically dominant members of the upper Gila River fish community, New Mexico, USA. Using comparative landscape genetics, we evaluated the role of network architecture for...

Data from: Decoupled responses of soil bacteria and their invertebrate consumer to warming, but not freeze-thaw cycles, in the Antarctic Dry Valleys

Matthew A. Knox, Walter S. Andriuzzi, Heather N. Buelow, Cristina Takacs-Vesbach, Byron J. Adams & Diana H. Wall
Altered temperature profiles resulting in increased warming and freeze–thaw cycle (FTC) frequency pose great ecological challenges to organisms in alpine and polar ecosystems. We performed a laboratory microcosm experiment to investigate how temperature variability affects soil bacterial cell numbers, and abundance and traits of soil microfauna (the microbivorous nematode Scottnema lindsayae) from McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. FTCs and constant freezing shifted nematode body size distribution towards large individuals, driven by higher mortality among smaller individuals....

Data from: Why are tropical mountain passes ‘low’ for some species? genetic and stable-isotope tests for differentiation, migration, and expansion in elevational generalist songbirds

Chauncey R. Gadek, Seth D. Newsome, Elizabeth J. Beckman, Andrea N. Chavez, Spencer C. Galen, Emil Bautista & Christopher C. Witt
1.Most tropical bird species have narrow elevational ranges, likely reflecting climatic specialization. This is consistent with Janzen's Rule, the tendency for mountain passes to be effectively ‘higher’ in the tropics. Hence, those few tropical species that occur across broad elevational gradients (elevational generalists) represent a contradiction to Janzen's Rule. 2.Here we aim to address the following questions. Are elevational generalists being sundered by diversifying selection along the gradient? Does elevational movement cause these species to...

Data from: The effect of nitrogen availability and water conditions on competition between a facultative CAM plant and an invasive grass

Kailiang Yu, Paolo D'Odorico, David E. Carr, Ashden Personius & Scott L. Collins
Abstract Plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) are increasing their abundance in drylands worldwide. The drivers and mechanisms underlying the increased dominance of CAM plants and CAM expression (i.e., nocturnal carboxylation) in facultative CAM plants, however, remain poorly understood. We investigated how nutrient and water availability affected competition between Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (a model facultative CAM species) and the invasive C3 grass Bromus mollis that co-occur in California's coastal grasslands. Specifically we investigated the extent to...

Data from: Generalist predator's niche shifts reveal ecosystem changes in an experimentally fragmented landscape

Julian Resasco, Kika T. Tuff, Saul A. Cunningham, Brett A. Melbourne, Andrew L. Hicks, Seth D. Newsome & Kendi F. Davies
Habitat fragmentation can alter the trophic structure of communities and environmental conditions, thus driving changes in biodiversity and ecosystem functions. Quantifying niches of generalist predators can reveal how fragmentation alters ecosystems. In a habitat fragmentation experiment, we used stable isotopes of a generalist predator skink to test predictions from spatial theory on trophic structure and to quantify abiotic changes associated with fragmentation among continuous forest, fragments, and matrix habitats. We predicted that in fragments and...

Data from: Vegetation response to control of invasive Tamarix in southwestern US rivers: a collaborative study including 416 sites

Eduardo González, Anna A. Sher, Robert M. Anderson, Robin F. Bay, Daniel W. Bean, Gabriel J. Bissonnete, Bérenger Bourgeois, David J. Cooper, Kara Dohrenwend, Kim D. Eichhorst, Hisham El Waer, Deborah K. Kennard, Rebecca Harms-Weissinger, Annie L. Henry, Lori J. Makarick, Steven M. Ostoja, Lindsay V. Reynolds, W. Wright Robinson & Patrick B. Shafroth
Most studies assessing vegetation response following control of invasive Tamarix trees along southwestern U.S. rivers have been small in scale (e.g., river reach), or at a regional scale but with poor spatial-temporal replication, and most have not included testing the effects of a now widely-used biological control. We monitored plant composition following Tamarix control along hydrologic, soil and climatic gradients in 244 treated and 172 reference sites across six U.S. States. This represents the largest...

Data from: A phylogenetic, biogeographic, and taxonomic study of all extant species of Anolis (Squamata; Iguanidae)

Steven Poe, Adrian Nieto-Montes De Oca, Omar Torres-Carvajal, Kevin De Queiroz, Julian A. Velasco, Brad Truett, Levi N. Gray, Mason J. Ryan, Gunther Kohler, Fernando Ayala-Varela & Ian Latella
Anolis lizards (anoles) are textbook study organisms in evolution and ecology. Although several topics in evolutionary biology have been elucidated by the study of anoles, progress in some areas has been hampered by limited phylogenetic information on this group. Here we present a phylogenetic analysis of all 379 extant species of Anolis, with new phylogenetic data for 139 species including new DNA data for 101 species. We use the resulting estimates as a basis for...

Data from: Interannual variations in needle and sapwood traits of Pinus edulis branches under an experimental drought

Marceau Guerin, Dario Martin-Benito, Georg Von Arx, Laia Andreu Hayles, Kevin L. Griffin, Rayann Hamdan, Nate G. McDowell, Robert Muscarella, Will Pockman, Pierre Gentine, William Pockman & Laia Andreu-Hayles
1) In the Southwest United States, recent large-scale die-offs of conifers raise the question of their resilience and mortality under droughts. To date, little is known about the interannual structural response to droughts. 2) We hypothesized that piñon pines (Pinus edulis) respond to drought by reducing the drop of leaf water potential in branches from year to year through needle morphological adjustments. We tested our hypothesis using a seven-year experiment in central New Mexico with...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • University of New Mexico
    9
  • Colorado State University
    2
  • American Museum of Natural History
    2
  • University of Montana
    1
  • National Museum of Natural History
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  • Columbia University
    1
  • University of California System
    1
  • University of Virginia
    1
  • University of Toulouse
    1
  • Australian National University
    1