19 Works

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in species composition constrains plant community responses to herbivory and fertilization

Dorothee Hodapp, Elizabeth T. Borer, W. Stanley Harpole, Eric M. Lind, Eric W. Seabloom, Peter B. Adler, Juan Alberti, Carlos A. Arnillas, Jonathan D. Bakker, Lori Biederman, Marc Cadotte, Elsa E. Cleland, Scott Collins, Philip A. Fay, Jennifer Firn, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Oscar Iribarne, Johannes M.H. Knops, Rebecca L. McCulley, Andrew MacDougall, Joslin L. Moore, John W. Morgan, Brent Mortensen, Kimberly J. La Pierre … & Johannes M. H. Knops
Environmental change can result in substantial shifts in community composition. The associated immigration and extinction events are likely constrained by the spatial distribution of species. Still, studies on environmental change typically quantify biotic responses at single spatial (time series within a single plot) or temporal (spatial beta-diversity at single time points) scales, ignoring their potential interdependence. Here, we use data from a global network of grassland experiments to determine how turnover responses to two major...

Data from: Efficacy of Aedes aegypti control by indoor Ultra Low Volume (ULV) insecticide spraying in Iquitos, Peru

Christian E. Gunning, Kenichi Okamoto, Helvio Astete, Gissella M. Vasquez, Erik B. Erhardt, Clara Del Aguila, Raul Pinedo, Roldan Cardenas, Carlos Pacheco, Enrique Chalco, Hugo Rodriguez-Ferruci, Thomas W. Scott, Alun L. Lloyd, Fred Gould, Amy C. Morrison, Kenichi W. Okamoto & Erik Erhardt
Background: Aedes aegypti is a primary vector of dengue, chikungunya, Zika, and urban yellow fever viruses. Indoor, ultra low volume (ULV) space spraying with pyrethroid insecticides is the main approach used for Ae. aegypti emergency control in many countries. Given the widespread use of this method, the lack of large-scale experiments or detailed evaluations of municipal spray programs is problematic. Methodology/Principal Findings: Two experimental evaluations of non-residual, indoor ULV pyrethroid spraying were conducted in Iquitos,...

Data from: Low serum sodium levels at hospital admission: outcomes among 2.3 million hospitalized patients

Saleem Al Mawed, V. Shane Pankratz, Kelly Chong, Matthew Sandoval, Maria-Eleni Roumelioti & Mark Unruh
Background: Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte disorder among hospitalized patients. Controversies still exist over the relationship between hyponatremia and outcomes of hospitalized patients. Methods: To analyze the association of low serum sodium levels at hospital admission with in-hospital mortality and patient disposition and to compare the distribution of the risk of death associated with hyponatremia across the lifespan of hospitalized patients, we conducted an observational study of 2.3 million patients using data extracted from...

Data from: Empirical test of the native–nonnative distinction: Native and nonnative assemblages of Anolis lizards are similar in morphology and phylogeny

Steven Poe & Ian M. Latella
1. Nonnative ("invasive," "exotic," "naturalized") species frequently are vilified. However, some philosophers and ecologists have questioned whether nonnative species and assemblages are objectively, ahistorically identifiable as different entities relative to native species and assemblages, once selection biases are taken into account. 2. We used an unprecedented dataset of morphology, phylogeny, and assemblage content for 336 species of Anolis lizard to compare morphological and phylogenetic characteristics of variability and central tendency between native assemblages and those...

Data from: Loss of genetic diversity, recovery, and allele surfing in a colonizing parasite, Geomydoecus aurei

James W. Demastes, David J. Hafner, Mark S. Hafner, Jessica E. Light & Theresa A. Spradling
Understanding the genetic consequences of changes in species distributions has wide-ranging implications for predicting future outcomes of climate change, for protecting threatened or endangered populations, and for understanding the history that has led to current genetic patterns within species. Herein, we examine the genetic consequences of range expansion over a 25-year period in a parasite (Geomydoecus aurei) that is in the process of expanding its geographic range via invasion of a novel host. By sampling...

Data from: Risk factors for respiratory illness in a community of wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii)

Melissa Emery Thompson, Zarin P. Machanda, Erik J. Scully, Drew K. Enigk, Emily Otali, Martin N. Muller, Tony L. Goldberg, Colin A. Chapman & Richard W. Wrangham
Respiratory disease has caused significant mortality in African great ape populations. While much effort has been given to identifying the responsible pathogens, little is known about the factors that influence disease transmission or individual susceptibility. In the Kanyawara community of wild chimpanzees, respiratory illness has been the leading cause of mortality over 30 years, contributing to 27% of deaths. Deaths were common in all age groups except juveniles. Over 22 years of health observations, respiratory...

Data from: Phylogeography of a widespread lizard complex reflects patterns of both geographic and ecological isolation

Levi N. Gray, Anthony J. Barley, Steven Poe, Robert C. Thomson, Adrián Nieto-Montes De Oca & Ian J. Wang
A primary challenge for modern phylogeography is understanding how ecology and geography, both contemporary and historical, shape the spatial distribution and evolutionary histories of species. Phylogeographic patterns are the result of many factors, including geology, climate, habitat, colonization history, and lineage-specific constraints. Assessing the relative influences of these factors is difficult because few species, regions, and environments are sampled in enough detail to compare competing hypotheses rigorously and because a particular phylogeographic pattern can potentially...

Data from: Variance in reproductive success is driven by environmental factors not mating system in Bonytail

Megan J. Osborne, Alyssa V. Sanchez, Thomas E. Dowling & Thomas F. Turner
Studying the reproductive ecology of aggregate broadcast spawning fishes is difficult because it generally is not feasible to sample all potential parents and unambiguously assign their offspring. We used molecular‐based parentage analysis to gain insights into the reproductive ecology of the endangered Bonytail, and to evaluate whether protected off‐channel habitats could be used as an alternative to hatchery production. By genotyping adults and offspring stocked (n = 4130) into two experimental backwaters across three years,...

Data from: Trait-specific processes of convergence and conservatism shape ecomorphological evolution in ground-dwelling squirrels

Bryan S. McLean, Kristofer M. Helgen, H. Thomas Goodwin & Joseph A. Cook
Our understanding of mechanisms operating over deep timescales to shape phenotypic diversity often hinges on linking variation in one or few trait(s) to specific evolutionary processes. When distinct processes are capable of similar phenotypic signatures, however, identifying these drivers is difficult. We explored ecomorphological evolution across a radiation of ground-dwelling squirrels whose history includes convergence and constraint, two processes that can yield similar signatures of standing phenotypic diversity. Using 4 ecologically-relevant trait datasets (body size,...

Data from: Guidelines and considerations for designing field experiments simulating precipitation extremes in forest ecosystems

Heidi Asbjornsen, John L. Campbell, Katie A. Jennings, Matthew A. Vadeboncoeur, Cameron McIntire, Pamela H. Templer, Richard P. Phillips, Taryn L. Bauerle, Michael C. Dietze, Serita D. Frey, Peter M. Groffman, Rosella Guerrieri, Paul J. Hanson, Eric P. Kelsey, Alan K. Knapp, Nathan G. McDowell, Patrick Meir, Kimberly A. Novick, Scott V. Ollinger, Will T. Pockman, Paul G. Schaberg, Stan D. Wullschleger, Melinda D. Smith & Lindsey E. Rustad
1. Context. Precipitation regimes are changing in response to climate change, yet understanding of how forest ecosystems respond to extreme droughts and pluvials remains incomplete. As future precipitation extremes will likely fall outside the range of historical variability, precipitation manipulation experiments (PMEs) are critical to advancing knowledge about potential ecosystem responses. However, few PMEs have been conducted in forests compared to short-statured ecosystems, and forest PMEs have unique design requirements and constraints. Moreover, past forest...

Data from: Living on the edge: exploring the role of coastal refugia in the Alexander Archipelago of Alaska

Yadeeh E. Sawyer, S.O. MacDonald, Enrique P. Lessa, Joseph A. Cook & Yadeeh Sawyer
Although islands are of long-standing interest to biologists, only a handful of studies have investigated the role of climatic history in shaping evolutionary diversification in high latitude archipelagos. In this study of the Alexander Archipelago (AA) of Southeast Alaska, we address the impact of glacial cycles on geographic genetic structure for three mammals co-distributed along the North Pacific Coast. We examined variation in mitochondrial and nuclear loci for long-tailed voles (Microtus longicaudus), northwestern deermice (Peromyscus...

Data from: Genomic sequence capture of haemosporidian parasites: methods and prospects for enhanced study of host-parasite evolution

Lisa N. Barrow, Julie M. Allen, Xi Huang, Staffan Bensch & Christopher C. Witt
Avian malaria and related haemosporidians (Plasmodium, [Para]Haemoproteus, and Leucocytoozoon) represent an exciting multi-host, multi-parasite system in ecology and evolution. Global research in this field accelerated after 1) the publication in 2000 of PCR protocols to sequence a haemosporidian mitochondrial (mtDNA) barcode, and 2) the development in 2009 of an open-access database to document the geographic and host ranges of parasite mtDNA haplotypes. Isolating haemosporidian nuclear DNA from bird hosts, however, has been technically challenging, slowing...

Data from: Body size shifts influence effects of increasing temperatures on ectotherm metabolism

Kristina Riemer, Kristina J. Anderson-Teixeira, Felisa A. Smith, David J. Harris, S.K. Morgan Ernest & S. K. Morgan Ernest
Aim: Warmer temperatures directly increase metabolic rates of ectotherms, but temperature also indirectly affects metabolic rates. Higher temperatures result in smaller body sizes and associated decreases in metabolic rates, and it remains unknown whether this indirect effect of temperature increase could mitigate the direct positive effect of temperature on metabolic rate. Here, we assess whether temperature‐induced shifts in body size are likely to offset the direct influence of temperature on metabolic rate. Location: Global. Time...

Data from: Targeted sampling and target capture: assessing phylogeographic concordance with genome-wide data

Lisa N. Barrow, Alan R. Lemmon & Emily Moriarty Lemmon
Comparative phylogeography provides the necessary framework to examine the factors influencing population divergence, persistence, and change over time. Avise (2000) outlined four aspects of concordance that result when data exhibit significant phylogeographic signal: concordance among sites within a locus, among multiple loci within a species, among multiple species within a region, and between genetic patterns and established biogeographic provinces. To fully address each aspect of concordance, we combined target capture of a set of orthologous...

Data from: Fitness decline under osmotic stress in Caenorhabditis elegans populations subjected to spontaneous mutation accumulation at varying population sizes

Vaishali Katju, Lucille Boreal Packard & Peter David Keightley
The consequences of mutations for population fitness depends on their individual selection coefficients and the effective population size. An earlier study of Caenorhabditis elegans spontaneous mutation accumulation lines evolved for 409 generations at three population sizes found that Ne = 1 populations declined significantly in fitness whereas the fitness of larger populations (Ne = 5, 50) was indistinguishable from the ancestral control under benign conditions. To test if larger MA populations harbor a load of...

Data from: Phylogenetic patterns of trait and trait plasticity evolution: Insights from amphibian embryos

Rick Relyea, Patrick R. Stephens, Lisa N. Barrow, Andrew Blaustein, Paul Bradley, Julia Buck, Ann Chang, Brian I Crother, James Collins, Julia Earl, Stephanie S. Gervasi, Jason T. Hoverman, Olliver Hyman, Emily Claire Moriarty Lemmon, Thomas Luhring, Moses Michelsohn, Christopher M. Murray, Steven Price, Raymond Semlitsch, Andy Sih, Aaron Stoler, Nick VandenBroek, Alexa Warwick, Greta Wengert, John Hammond … & Aaron B. Stoler
Environmental variation favors the evolution of phenotypic plasticity. For many species, we understand the costs and benefits of different phenotypes, but we lack a broad understanding of how plastic traits evolve across large clades. Using identical experiments conducted across North America, we examined prey responses to predator cues. We quantified five life history traits and the magnitude of their plasticity for 23 amphibian species/populations (spanning three families and five genera) when exposed to no cues,...

Data from: Data management, archiving and sharing for biologists and the role of research institutions in the technology-oriented age

Sebastien Renaut, Amber E. Budden, Dominique Gravel, Timothée Poisot & Pedro Peres-Neto
Data are one of the primary outputs of science. Although certain sub-disciplines of biology have pioneered efforts to ensure their long-term preservation and facilitate collaborations, data continue to disappear, owing mostly to technological, regulatory and ideological hurdles. In this review, we describe the important steps towards proper data management and archiving, and provide a critical discussion on the importance of long term data conservation. We then illustrate the rise in data archiving through the Joint...

Data from: Impacts of inference method and dataset filtering on phylogenomic resolution in a rapid radiation of ground squirrels (Xerinae: Marmotini)

Bryan S. McLean, Kayce C. Bell, Julia M. Allen, Kristofer M. Helgen, Joseph A. Cook & Julie M Allen
Phylogenomic datasets are illuminating many areas of the Tree of Life. However, the large size of these datasets alone may be insufficient to resolve problematic nodes in the most rapid evolutionary radiations, because inferences in zones of extraordinarily low phylogenetic signal can be sensitive to the model and method of inference, as well as the information content of loci employed. We used a dataset of >3,950 ultraconserved element (UCE) loci from a classic mammalian radiation,...

Data from: Implementation of electronic charting is not associated with significant change in physician productivity in an academic emergency department

Dusadee Sarangarm, Gregory Lamb, Steven Weiss, Amy Ernst & Lorraine Hewitt
Objectives: To compare physician productivity and billing before and after implementation of electronic charting in an academic ED. Materials and Methods: This retrospective, blinded, observational study compared the 6 months pre-implementation (January to June 2012) with the 6 months post-implementation one year later (January to June 2013). Thirty-one ED physicians were recruited, with each physician acting as his/her own control in a before-after design. Productivity was measured via total number of encounters and “productivity index”...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    19

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    19

Affiliations

  • University of New Mexico
    19
  • University of Florida
    3
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • Texas A&M University
    2
  • University of Nevada Reno
    2
  • University of Edinburgh
    2
  • University of Kentucky
    2
  • University of Nebraska - Lincoln
    2
  • Florida State University
    2
  • University of Washington
    1