13 Works

Data from: Ant community and habitat limit colony establishment by the fire ant, Solenopis invicta

Walter R. Tschinkel & Joshua R. King
Hypotheses of community assembly include limitation through habitat physical attributes, as well as competition among species. Such hypotheses must be resolved through experimental tests. Previous experiments have shown that: (i) fire ants of the monogyne social form occur mostly in highly disturbed habitat where they do not compete with mature colonies of co-occurring ants; (ii) in native pine forests of northern Florida, habitat disturbance favours fire ants while simultaneously reducing native ants; (iii) fire ants...

Data from: Local adaptation of fish consumers alters primary production through changes in algal community composition and diversity

Ron D. Bassar, Brynne L. Bryan, Michael C. Marshall, Catherine M. Pringle, David N. Reznick, Joseph Travis & Ronald D. Bassar
Ecological research has focused on understanding how changes in consumer abundance affect community structure and ecosystem processes. However, there is increasing evidence that evolutionary changes in consumers can also alter community structure and ecosystem processes. Typically, the effects of consumer phenotype on communities and ecosystem processes are measured as net effects that integrate numerous ecological pathways. Here, we analyze new data from experimental manipulations of Trinidadian guppy Poecilia reticulata presence, density and phenotype to examine...

Data from: The evolution of coexistence: reciprocal adaptation promotes the assembly of a simple community

Ronald D. Bassar, Troy Simon, William Roberts, Joseph Travis & David N. Reznick
Species coexistence may result by chance when co-occurring species do not strongly interact or it may be an evolutionary outcome of strongly interacting species adapting to each other. While patterns like character displacement indicate that coexistence has often been an evolutionary outcome, it is unclear how often the evolution of coexistence represents adaptation in only one species or reciprocal adaptation among all interacting species. Here we demonstrate a strong role for evolution in the coexistence...

Data from: Anchored phylogenomics improves the resolution of evolutionary relationships in the rapid radiation of Protea L.

Nora Mitchell, Paul O. Lewis, Emily Moriarty Lemmon, Alan R. Lemmon & Kent E. Holsinger
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Estimating phylogenetic relationships in relatively recent evolutionary radiations is challenging, especially if short branches associated with recent divergence result in multiple gene tree histories. We combine anchored enrichment next-generation sequencing with species tree analyses to produce a robust estimate of phylogenetic relationships in the genus Protea (Proteaceae), an iconic radiation in South Africa. METHODS: We sampled multiple individuals within 59 out of 112 species of Protea and 6 outgroup species for...

Data from: Edaphic properties enable facilitative and competitive interactions resulting in fairy circle formation

Michael D. Cramer, Nichole N. Barger & Walter R. Tschinkel
Millions of generally regularly spaced, roughly circular barren patches called fairy circles occur in a narrow band ca. 100 km inland of the south-west African coast. These generally have conspicuously taller peripheral grasses in a shorter grass matrix. The origins of these fairy circles are controversial, but one possibility is that they are self-organizing emergent vegetation patterns that are the consequence of interplay between positive (facilitative) and negative (competitive) interactions between grasses. We hypothesized that...

Data from: Historical baselines and the future of shell calcification for a foundation species in a changing ocean

Catherine A. Pfister, Kaustuv Roy, J. Timothy Wootton, Sophie J. McCoy, Robert T. Paine, Thomas H. Suchanek & Eric Sanford
Seawater pH and the availability of carbonate ions is decreasing due to anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, posing challenges for calcifying marine species. Marine mussels are of particular concern given their role as foundation species worldwide. Here, we document shell growth and calcification patterns in Mytilus californianus, the California mussel, over millennial and decadal scales. By comparing shell thickness across the largest modern shells, the largest mussels collected in the 1960s-1970s and shells from two Native...

Data from: Resolving Cypriniformes relationships using an anchored enrichment approach

Carla C. Stout, Milton Tan, Alan R. Lemmon, Emily Moriarty Lemmon & Jonathan W. Armbruster
Background: Cypriniformes (minnows, carps, loaches, and suckers) is the largest group of freshwater fishes in the world (~4300 described species). Despite much attention, previous attempts to elucidate relationships using molecular and morphological characters have been incongruent. In this study we present the first phylogenomic analysis using anchored hybrid enrichment for 172 taxa to represent the order (plus three out-group taxa), which is the largest dataset for the order to date (219 loci, 315,288 bp, average...

Data from: Expanding anchored hybrid enrichment to resolve both deep and shallow relationships within the spider tree of life

Chris A. Hamilton, Alan R. Lemmon, Emily Moriarty Lemmon & Jason E. Bond
Background: Despite considerable effort, progress in spider molecular systematics has lagged behind many other comparable arthropod groups, thereby hindering family-level resolution, classification, and testing of important macroevolutionary hypotheses. Recently, alternative targeted sequence capture techniques have provided molecular systematics a powerful tool for resolving relationships across the Tree of Life. One of these approaches, Anchored Hybrid Enrichment (AHE), is designed to recover hundreds of unique orthologous loci from across the genome, for resolving both shallow and...

Data from: Integrating phylogenomic and morphological data to assess candidate species-delimitation models in brown and red-bellied snakes (Storeria)

Robert Alexander Pyron, Felisa W. Hsieh, Alan R. Lemmon, Emily M. Lemmon & Catriona R. Hendry
Systematics at the species level is still marked by theoretical and empirical tensions amongst the desires to identify geographical lineages, delimit species, and estimate their relationships. These goals are often confounded because each relies, at least to some extent, on the others being known. However, recently developed methods can simultaneously address all three. Furthermore, next-generation genomic sequencing allows us to generate large-scale molecular data sets to examine variation within species at a fine scale. Finally,...

Data from: Abiotic proxies for predictive mapping of near-shore benthic assemblages: implications for marine spatial planning

Jennifer McHenry, Robert S. Steneck & Damian C. Brady
Marine spatial planning (MSP) should assist managers in guiding human activities towards sustainable practices and in minimizing user-conflicts in our oceans. A necessary first step is to quantify spatial patterns of marine assemblages in order to understand the ecosystem’s structure, function, and services. However, the large spatial scale, high economic value, and density of human activities in near-shore habitats often makes quantifying this component of marine ecosystems especially daunting. To address this challenge, we developed...

Data from: Agricultural practices for food safety threaten pest control services for fresh produce

Daniel S. Karp, Rebekah Moses, Sasha Gennet, Matthew S. Jones, Shimat Joseph, Leithen K. M'Gonigle, Lauren C. Ponisio, William E. Snyder & Claire Kremen
Over the past decade, several foodborne disease outbreaks provoked widespread reforms to the fresh produce industry. Subsequent concerns about wildlife vectors and contaminated manures created pressure on growers to discontinue use of manure-based composts and remove nearby semi-natural vegetation. Despite widespread adoption, impacts of these practices on ecosystem services such as pest control have not been assessed. We used a landscape-scale field experiment to quantify associations between compost applications, semi-natural vegetation, pest control services and...

Data from: Diversification in wild populations of the model organism Anolis carolinensis: a genome-wide phylogeographic investigation

Joseph D. Manthey, Marc Tollis, Alan R. Lemmon, Emily Moriarty Lemmon & Stephane Boissinot
The green anole (Anolis carolinensis) is a lizard widespread throughout the southeastern United States and is a model organism for the study of reproductive behavior, physiology, neural biology, and genomics. Previous phylogeographic studies of A. carolinensis using mitochondrial DNA and small numbers of nuclear loci identified conflicting and poorly supported relationships among geographically structured clades; these inconsistencies preclude confident use of A. carolinensis evolutionary history in association with morphological, physiological, or reproductive biology studies among...

Data from: Genomic data detect corresponding signatures of population size change on an ecological time scale in two salamander species

Schyler O. Nunziata, Stacey L. Lance, David E. Scott, Emily Moriarty Lemmon & David W. Weisrock
Understanding the demography of species over recent history (e.g., < 100 years) is critical in studies of ecology and evolution, but records of population history are rarely available. Surveying genetic variation is a potential alternative to census-based estimates of population size, and can yield insight into the demography of a population. However, to assess the performance of genetic methods it is important to compare their estimates of population history to known demography. Here, we leveraged...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    13

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    13

Affiliations

  • Florida State University
    13
  • University of Georgia
    3
  • University of California System
    2
  • Auburn University
    2
  • University of Oxford
    2
  • California Polytechnic State University
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • New York University Abu Dhabi
    1
  • George Washington University
    1
  • University of Maine
    1