16 Works

Rom, Italien. Ein neues Forschungsprojekt auf dem Kapitol in Rom. Grabungen im Garten des ehemaligen preußischen Hospitals, Kampagne 2018

Ortwin Dally, Silvia Aglietti, Heinz Beste, Alessandro Blanco, Alberto Danti, Karoline Manfrecola, Pamela Manzo, Daniele Nepi, Claudio Parisi Presicce, Roberta Tanganelli & Francesca Zagari
A first campaign of a new project on the Capitoline Hill took place between July and September 2018 on the southwestern tip of the Capitol Hill in Rome including geophysical prospections, excavations in the garden behind the first Institute’s building and the former Protestant Hospital of 1836 and a beginning documentation of the remaining architectural ruins of the temple of Iuppiter Optimus Maximus. The research of a three-week measuring campaign was going to focus on...

Biogeographic differences in plant-soil biota relationships contribute to the invasion exotic range expansion of Verbascum thapsus

Julia Dieskau, Helge Bruelheide, Alexandra Erfmeier & Jessica Gutknecht
Exotic plant species can evolve adaptations to environmental conditions in the exotic range. Furthermore, soil biota can foster exotic spread in the absence of negative soil pathogen-plant interactions or because of increased positive soil biota-plant feedbacks in the exotic range. Little is known, however, about the evolutionary dimension of plant-soil biota interactions when comparing native and introduced ranges. To assess the role of soil microbes for rapid evolution in plant invasion, we subjected Verbascum thapsus,...

Data from: Testing macroecological abundance patterns: the relationship between local abundance and range size, range position and climatic suitability among European vascular plants

Maria Sporbert, Petr Keil, Gunnar Seidler, Helge Bruelheide, Ute Jandt, Svetlana Aćić, Idoia Biurrun, Juan Antonio Campos, Andraž Čarni, Milan Chytrý, Renata Custerevska, Jürgen Dengler, Valentin Golub, Florian Jansen, Anna Kuzemko, Jonathan Lenoir, Corrado Marcenò, Jesper Erenskjold Moeslund, Aaron Pérez-Haase, Solvita Rūsiņa, Urban Šilc, Ioannis Tsiripidis, Vigdis Vandvik, Kiril Vassilev, Risto Virtanen … & Erik Welk
Aim: A fundamental question in macroecology centres around understanding the relationship between species’ local abundance and their distribution in geographic and climatic space (i.e. the multi-dimensional climatic space or climatic niche). Here, we tested three macroecological hypotheses that link local abundance to the following range properties: (1) the abundance-range size relationship, (2) the abundance-range centre relationship, and (3) the abundance-suitability relationship. Location: Europe Taxon: Vascular plants Methods: Distribution range maps were extracted from the Chorological...

Local adaptation constrains drought tolerance in a tropical foundation tree

Kasey Barton, Casey Jones, Kyle Edwards, Aaron Shiels & Tiffany Knight
1. Plant species with broad climatic ranges might be more vulnerable to climate change than previously appreciated due to intraspecific variation in climatic stress tolerance. In tropical forests, drought is increasingly frequent and severe, causing widespread declines and altering community dynamics. Yet, little is known about whether foundation tropical trees vary in drought tolerance throughout their distributions, and how intraspecific variation in drought tolerance might contribute to their vulnerability to climate change. 2. We tested...

Experimental evidence that novel land management interventions inspired by history enhance biodiversity

Robert Hawkes, Jennifer Smart, Andy Brown, Helen Jones, Steve Lane, Colin Lucas, James McGill, Nick Owens, Amanda Ratier Backes, Jonathan Webb, Doreen Wells & Paul Dolman
To address biodiversity declines within semi-natural habitats, land-management must cater for diverse taxonomic groups. Integrating our understanding of the ecological requirements of priority (rare, scarce or threatened) species through ‘biodiversity auditing’, with that of the intensity and complexity of historical land-use, encourages novel forms of management. Experimental confirmation is needed to establish whether this enhances biodiversity conservation relative to routine management. Biodiversity auditing and historical land-use of dry-open terrestrial habitats in Breckland (Eastern England) both...

Gender in die Hochschullehre : Das Projekt gender*bildet der MLU Halle-Wittenberg

Lena Eckert & Dayana Lau
Seit einigen Jahren werden verstärkt Projekte und Programme zur Verankerung von Gender Studies in der Hochschullehre eingerichtet. Eines von ihnen ist das Projekt gender*bildet, das es seit Juni 2018 an der MLU Halle-Wittenberg gibt. Das Projekt bietet Weiterbildungen für Lehrende zu gender- und diversitätsreflektierender Hochschuldidaktik sowie ein Zertifikat in Gender Studies an und fördert die Verankerung von Gender und Queer Studies in den Fachdisziplinen.

Data from: A critical analysis of the potential for EU Common Agricultural Policy measures to support wild pollinators on farmland

Lorna Cole, David Kleijn, Lynn Dicks, Jane Stout, Simon Potts, Matthias Albrecht, Mario Balzan, Ignasi Bartomeus, Penelope Bebeli, Danilo Bevk, Jacobus Biesmeijer, Róbert Chlebo, Anželika Dautartė, Nikolaos Emmanouil, Chris Hartfield, John Holland, Andrea Holzschuh, Nieke Knoben, Anikó Kovács-Hostyánszki, Yael Mandelik, Heleni Panou, Robert Paxton, Theodora Petanidou, Miguel Pinheiro De Carvalho, … & Jeroen Scheper
1. Agricultural intensification and associated loss of high-quality habitats are key drivers of insect pollinator declines. With the aim of decreasing the environmental impact of agriculture, the 2014 EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) defined a set of habitat and landscape features (Ecological Focus Areas: EFAs) farmers could select from as a requirement to receive basic farm payments. To inform the post-2020 CAP, we performed a European-scale evaluation to determine how different EFA options vary in...

Data from: Pollinator dependence but no pollen limitation for eight plants occurring north of the Arctic Circle

Viviane Koch, Leana Zoller, Joanne M. Bennett & Tiffany M. Knight
Intact interactions between plants and pollinators are essential for the reproduction of pollinator-dependent plant species. Global change factors, such as climate change, have the potential to disrupt these interactions and subsequently impair pollination service. This disruption can result in insufficient pollen receipt for plants and lower their reproduction success. High latitude sites experience particularly rapid climate change and plants at these locations are expected to be vulnerable to lower reproductive success due to pollen limitation....

The mark of captivity: plastic responses in the ankle bone of a wild ungulate (Sus scrofa)

Thomas CUCCHI, Hugo Harbers, Dimitri Neaux, Katia Ortiz, Flavie Laurens, Isabelle Baly, Cécile Callou, Renate Schafberg, Ashleigh Haruda, François Lecompte, Jacqueline Studer, Sabrina Renaud, Yann Locatelli, Jean-Denis Vigne & Anthony Herrel
Deciphering the plastic (non-heritable) changes induced by human control over wild animals in the archaeological record is challenging. We hypothesized that changes in locomotor behaviour in a wild ungulate due to mobility control could be quantified in the bone anatomy. To test this, we experimented the effect of mobility reduction on the skeleton of wild boar (Sus scrofa), using the calcaneus shape as a possible phenotypic marker. We first assessed differences in shape variation and...

Table S5: Occupancy change observations in bog species in the Black Forest (Germany) across all sites from 1972-2019

Helge Bruelheide & Thomas Sperle
Aim: Bogs and transition mires in Central Europe have undergone tremendous changes in the last decades, declining in spatial extent and favorable conservation status. However, species extinctions have been documented only rarely because of a lack of reliable floristic data. Here, we assessed species losses of bog complexes and analyzed their potential drivers. Location: Black Forest, Germany. Methods: We made use of the unique situation that the majority of bogs in the Black Forest (124...

Formicine ants swallow their highly acidic poison for gut microbial selection and control

Simon Tragust, Claudia Herrmann, Jane Häfner, Ronja Braasch, Christina Tilgen, Maria Hoock, Margarita Milidakis, Roy Gross & Heike Feldhaar
Animals continuously encounter microorganisms that are essential for health or cause disease. They are thus challenged to control harmful microbes while allowing acquisition of beneficial microbes. This challenge is likely especially important for social insects with respect to microbes in food, as they often store food and exchange food among colony members. Here we show that formicine ants actively swallow their antimicrobial, highly acidic poison gland secretion. The ensuing acidic environment in the stomach, the...

Experimental infection of bumble bees with honey bee associated viruses: no direct fitness costs but potential future threats to novel wild bee hosts

Anja Tehel, Tabea Streicher, Simon Tragust & Robert Paxton
Pathogen spill-over represents an important cause of biodiversity decline. For wild bee species such as bumble bees, many of which are in decline, correlational data point toward viral spill-over from naged honey bees as a potential cause. Yet impacts of honey bee viruses on wild bees are rarely evaluated. Here, in a series of highly controlled laboratory infection assays with well characterised viral inocula, we show that three viral types isolated from honey bees (Deformed...

A new remarkable dwarf sedge (Carex phylloscirpoid, Cyperaceae) from Northern Chile, with insights on the evolution of Austral section Racemosae

Pedro Jiménez-Mejías, Patricio Saldivia, Sebastian Gebauer & Santiago Martín-Bravo
We describe a new remarkable dwarf and apparently acaulescent species of Carex (Cyperaceae) from the Andes of northern Chile: Carex phylloscirpoides. Morphological and molecular data (two nuclear and three plastid DNA regions) were used to study the phylogenetic placement and systematic relationships of this species, which resulted in its assignment to section Racemosae. However, despite being related to the other three species of the section present in the Southern Cone based on phylogenetic evidence, it...

Screening and microsatellite data for Varroa infesting resistant honey bee pupae

Benjamin Conlon, Chedly Kastally, Marina Kardell, John Kefuss, Robin Moritz & Jarkko Routtu
We investigated how the evolution of host resistance could affect the infesting population of Varroa mites. We screened a Varroa-resistant honey bee population near Toulouse, France, for a Varroa resistance trait: the inhibition of Varroa's reproduction in drone pupae. We then genotyped Varroa which had co-infested a cell using microsatellites. Across all resistant honey bee colonies, Varroa's reproductive success was significantly higher in co-infested cells but the distribution of Varroa between singly and multiply infested...

Data from: Species-area relationships in the Andaman and Nicobar islands emerge because rarer species are disproportionately favored on larger islands

Leana Gooriah, Priya Davidar & Jonathan Chase
The Island Species-Area relationship (ISAR) describes how the number of species increases with increasing size of an island (or island-like habitat), and is of fundamental importance in island biogeography and conservation. Here, we use a framework based on individual-based rarefaction to infer whether ISARs result from passive sampling, or whether some processes are acting beyond sampling (e.g., disproportionate effects and/or habitat heterogeneity). Using data on total and relative abundances of four taxa (birds, butterflies, amphibians...

Data from: Phylogenetic and functional distinctiveness explain alien plant population responses to competition

Sam Levin, Raelene Crandall, Tyler Pokoski, Claudia Stein & Tiffany Knight
Several invasion hypotheses predict a positive association between phylogenetic and functional distinctiveness of aliens and their performance, leading to the idea that distinct aliens compete less with their resident communities. However, synthetic pattern relationships between distinctiveness and alien performance and direct tests of competition as the driving mechanism have not been forthcoming. This is likely because different patterns are observed at different spatial grains, because functional trait and phylogenetic information are often incomplete, and due...

Registration Year

  • 2020
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Affiliations

  • Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg
    16
  • University of Würzburg
    2
  • University of East Anglia
    2
  • University of Oulu
    2
  • Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique
    2
  • University of the Basque Country
    1
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    1
  • National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine
    1
  • Natural England
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  • Lund University
    1