4 Works

Data from: Net assimilation rate determines the growth rates of 14 species of subtropical forest trees

Xuefei Li, Bernhard Schmid, Fei Wang & C. E. Timothy Paine
Growth rates are of fundamental importance for plants, as individual size affects myriad ecological processes. We determined the factors that generate variation in RGR among 14 species of trees and shrubs that are abundant in subtropical Chinese forests. We grew seedlings for two years at four light levels in a shade-house experiment. We monitored the growth of every juvenile plant every two weeks. After one and two years, we destructively harvested individuals and measured their...

Data from: De novo transcriptome assembly databases in the butterfly orchid Phalaenopsis equestris

Shan-Ce Niu, Qing Xu, Guo-Qiang Zhang, Yong-Qiang Zhang, Wen-Chieh Tsai, Jui-Ling Hsu, Chieh-Kai Liang, Yi-Bo Luo & Zhong-Jian Liu
Orchids are renowned for their spectacular flowers and ecological adaptations. After the sequencing of the genome of the tropical epiphytic orchid Phalaenopsis equestris, we combined Illumina HiSeq2000 for RNA-Seq and Trinity for de novo assembly to characterize the transcriptomes for 11 diverse P. equestris tissues representing the root, stem, leaf, flower buds, column, lip, petal, sepal and three developmental stages of seeds. Our aims were to contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms...

Data from: Promise and challenge of DNA barcoding in Venus slipper (Paphiopedilum)

Zhong-Jian Liu, Xiao-Quan Wang, Lai-Qiang Huang & Yan-Yan Guo
Orchidaceae are one of the largest families of flowering plants, with over 27,000 species described and all orchids are listed in CITES. Moreover, the seedlings of orchid species from the same genus are similar. The objective of DNA barcoding is rapid, accurate, and automated species identification, which may be used to identify illegally traded endangered species from vegetative specimens of Paphiopedilum (Venus slipper), a flagship group for plant conservation with high ornamental and commercial values....

Data from: Discrimination behavior mediates foraging quality versus quantity trade-offs: nut choice in wild rodents

Wenwen Chen, Ze Zhang, Christina D. Buesching, Chris Newman, David W. Macdonald, Zongqiang Xie, Shucun Sun & Youbing Zhou
Discrimination, the ability to distinguish sensory stimuli and respond accordingly, is a critical factor underscoring optimal foraging decisions. Nevertheless, little is known about how mammals discriminate between apparently similar foods of different quality. Here, we compared the foraging behavior of Chinese white-bellied rats, Niviventer confucianus, and Edwards’s long-tailed giant rats, Leopoldamys edwardsi, under natural conditions in the field and in a captive enclosure without predation/competition. We examined the behavioral processes involved in discriminating between sound...

Registration Year

  • 2016
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Institute of Botany
    4
  • National Cheng Kung University
    1
  • Nanjing University
    1
  • University of Zurich
    1
  • Tsinghua University
    1
  • University of Stirling
    1
  • Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University
    1
  • University of Oxford
    1