39 Works

Data from: Shrubs as ecosystem engineers across an environmental gradient: effects on species richness and exotic plant invasion

Andrew R. Kleinhesselink, Susan M. Magnoli & J. Hall Cushman
Ecosystem-engineering plants modify the physical environment and can increase species diversity and exotic species invasion. At the individual level, the effects of ecosystem engineers on other plants often become more positive in stressful environments. In this study, we investigated whether the community-level effects of ecosystem engineers also become stronger in more stressful environments. Using comparative and experimental approaches, we assessed the ability of a native shrub (Ericameria ericoides) to act as an ecosystem engineer across...

Data from: The relative importance of rapid evolution for plant-microbe interactions depends on ecological context

Casey P. TerHorst, Jennifer A. Lau & Jay T. Lennon
Evolution can occur on ecological time-scales, affecting community and ecosystem processes. However, the importance of evolutionary change relative to ecological processes remains largely unknown. Here, we analyse data from a long-term experiment in which we allowed plant populations to evolve for three generations in dry or wet soils and used a reciprocal transplant to compare the ecological effect of drought and the effect of plant evolutionary responses to drought on soil microbial communities and nutrient...

Data from: Bayesian hierarchical models for spatially misaligned data in R

Andrew O. Finley, Sudipto Banerjee & Bruce D. Cook
Spatial misalignment occurs when at least one of multiple outcome variables is missing at an observed location. For spatial data, prediction of these missing observations should be informed by within location association among outcomes and by proximate locations where measurements were recorded. This study details and illustrates a Bayesian regression framework for modelling spatially misaligned multivariate data. Particular attention is paid to developing valid probability models capable of estimating parameter posterior distributions and propagating uncertainty...

Data from: Divergent host preferences of above- and below-ground Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) and their hybrid offspring.

Megan L. Fritz, Edward D. Walker, James R. Miller, David W. Severson & Ian Dworkin
Culex pipiens form pipiens and Cx. pipiens form molestus (Diptera: Culicidae) belong to a cosmopolitan taxonomic group known as the Pipiens Assemblage. Hybridization between these forms is thought to contribute to human transmission of West Nile virus (WNV) in North America. Complementary choice and no-choice landing assays were developed to examine host acceptance by North American Cx. pipiens in the laboratory. Populations collected from above- and below-ground sites in suburban Chicago were identified as forms...

Data from: Host social behavior decreases exposure to vector-borne disease: a field experiment in a “hotspot” of West Nile virus transmission

Bethany L. Krebs, Tavis K. Anderson, Tony L. Goldberg, Gabriel L. Hamer, Uriel D. Kitron, Christina M. Newman, Marilyn O. Ruiz, Edward D. Walker & J. D. Brawn
Animals can decrease their individual risk of predation by forming groups. The encounter-dilution hypothesis extends the potential benefits of gregariousness to biting insects and vector-borne disease by predicting that the per capita number of insect bites should decrease within larger host groups. Although vector-borne diseases are common and can exert strong selective pressures on hosts, there have been few tests of the encounter-dilution effect in natural systems. We conducted an experimental test of the encounter-dilution...

Data from: Insights into the development and evolution of exaggerated traits using de novo transcriptomes of two species of horned scarab beetles

Ian A. Warren, J. Cristobal Vera, Annika Johns, Robert Zinna, James H. Marden, Douglas J. Emlen, Ian Dworkin & Laura C. Lavine
Scarab beetles exhibit an astonishing variety of rigid exo-skeletal outgrowths, known as “horns”. These traits are often sexually dimorphic and vary dramatically across species in size, shape, location, and allometry with body size. In many species, the horn exhibits disproportionate growth resulting in an exaggerated allometric relationship with body size, as compared to other traits, such as wings, that grow proportionately with body size. Depending on the species, the smallest males either do not produce...

Data from: Evolutionary rates for multivariate traits: the role of selection and genetic variation

William Pitchers, Jason Wolf, Tom Tregenza, John Hunt & Ian Dworkin
A fundamental question in evolutionary biology is the relative importance of selection and genetic architecture in determining evolutionary rates. Adaptive evolution can be described by the multivariate breeders' equation, which predicts evolutionary change for a suite of phenotypic traits as a product of directional selection acting on them (β) and the genetic variance–covariance matrix for those traits (G). Despite being empirically challenging to estimate, there are enough published estimates of G and β to allow...

Data from: Causes and consequences of genetic background effects illuminated by integrative genomic analysis

Christopher H. Chandler, Sudarshan Chari, David Tack & Ian Dworkin
The phenotypic consequences of individual mutations are modulated by the wild-type genetic background in which they occur. Although such background dependence is widely observed, we do not know whether general patterns across species and traits exist, nor about the mechanisms underlying it. We also lack knowledge on how mutations interact with genetic background to influence gene expression, and how this in turn mediates mutant phenotypes. Furthermore, how genetic background influences patterns of epistasis remains unclear....

Data from: Genetic architecture of a hormonal response to gene knockdown in honey bees

Kate E. Ihle, Olav Rueppell, Ying Wang, M. Kim Fondrk, , Gro V. Amdam & Zachary Y. Huang
Variation in endocrine signaling is proposed to underlie the evolution and regulation of social life histories, but the genetic architecture of endocrine signaling is still poorly understood. An excellent example of a hormonally influenced set of social traits is found in the honey bee (Apis mellifera): a dynamic and mutually suppressive relationship between juvenile hormone (JH) and the yolk precursor protein vitellogenin (Vg) regulates behavioral maturation and foraging of workers. Several other traits cosegregate with...

Data from: Shifts of tundra bacterial and archaeal communities along a permafrost thaw gradient in Alaska

Jie Deng, Yunfu Gu, Jin Zhang, Kai Xue, Yujia Qin, Mengting Yuan, Huaqun Yin, Zhili He, Liyou Wu, Edward Schuur, James Tiedje, Jizhong Zhou, James M. Tiedje & Edward A. G. Schuur
Understanding the response of permafrost microbial communities to climate warming is crucial for evaluating ecosystem feedbacks to global change. This study investigated soil bacterial and archaeal communities by Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons across a permafrost thaw gradient at different depths in Alaska with thaw progression for over three decades. Over 4.6 million passing 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained from a total of 97 samples, corresponding to 61 known classes and...

Data from: Perturbing the cellular cevels of steroid receptor coactivator-2 impairs murine endometrial function

Maria M. Szwarc, Ramakrishna Kommagani, Jae-Wook Jeong, San-Pin Wu, Sophia Y. Tsai, Ming-Jer Tsai, Bert W. O'Malley, Francesco J. DeMayo & John P. Lydon
As pleiotropic coregulators, members of the p160/steroid receptor coactivator (SRC) family control a broad spectrum of transcriptional responses that underpin a diverse array of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Because of their potent coregulator properties, strict controls on SRC expression levels are required to maintain normal tissue functionality. Accordingly, an unwarranted increase in the cellular levels of SRC members has been causally linked to the initiation and/or progression of a number of clinical disorders. Although knockout...

Data from: Nutritional control of body size through FoxO-Ultraspiracle mediated ecdysone biosynthesis

Takashi Koyama, Marisa A. Rodrigues, Alekos Athanasiadis, Alexander W. Shingleton & Christen K. Mirth
Despite their fundamental importance for body size regulation, the mechanisms that stop growth are poorly understood. In Drosophila melanogaster, growth ceases in response to a peak of the molting hormone ecdysone that coincides with a nutrition-dependent checkpoint, critical weight. Previous studies indicate that insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS)/Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling in the prothoracic glands (PGs) regulates ecdysone biosynthesis and critical weight. Here we elucidate a mechanism through which this occurs. We show that...

Data from: Aboveground herbivory by red milkweed beetles facilitates above- and below-ground conspecific insects and reduces fruit production in common milkweed

Alexis C. Erwin, Tobias Züst, Jared G. Ali & Anurag A. Agrawal
1. Initial herbivory and induced plant responses can influence subsequent above- and belowground herbivore attack. When two life stages of the same herbivore damage different plant parts sequentially, there is strong potential for plants to respond with induced plant defense against the later attacker. Alternatively, the earlier attacker could manipulate the host plant to facilitate the later-feeding life stage. 2. We studied herbivory by foliage-feeding adults and root-feeding larvae of the red milkweed beetle (Tetraopes...

Data from: Coexistence of evolving bacteria stabilized by a shared Black Queen function

James Jeffrey Morris, Spiridon E. Papoulis & Richard E. Lenski
The Black Queen Hypothesis (BQH) was originally proposed to explain the dependence of some marine bacteria on helper organisms for protection from hydrogen peroxide (HOOH). The BQH predicts that selection for the evolutionary loss of leaky functions from individuals can produce commensal or mutualistic interactions. We demonstrated the leakiness of HOOH detoxification by complementing a HOOH-sensitive Escherichia coli mutant with a plasmid-encoded HOOH-detoxifying enzyme, KatG, and then evolving populations founded by this strain in two...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    39

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    39

Affiliations

  • Michigan State University
    39
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    5
  • California State University, Northridge
    2
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center
    2
  • University of Oklahoma
    2
  • Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
    2
  • Indiana University Bloomington
    2
  • Inserm
    2
  • University of Florida
    2