94 Works

Data from: A genome-wide data assessment of the African lion (Panthera leo) population genetic structure and diversity in Tanzania

Nathalie Smitz, Olivia Jouvenet, Fredrick Ambwene Ligate, William-George Crosmary, Dennis Ikanda, Philippe Chardonnet, Alessandro Fusari, Kenny Meganck, François Gillet, Mario Melletti & Johan R. Michaux
The African lion (Panthera leo), listed as a vulnerable species on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (Appendix II of CITES), is mainly impacted by indiscriminate killing and prey base depletion. Additionally, habitat loss by land degradation and conversion has led to the isolation of some subpopulations, potentially decreasing gene flow and increasing inbreeding depression risks. Genetic drift resulting from weakened connectivity between strongholds can affect the genetic health of the species. In the...

Data from: A combinatorial analysis using observational data identifies species that govern ecosystem functioning

Benoît Jaillard, Philippe Deleporte, Michel Loreau & Cyrille Violle
Understanding the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning has so far resulted from two main approaches: the analysis of species' functional traits, and the analysis of species interaction networks. Here we propose a third approach, based on the association between combinations of species or of functional groups, which we term assembly motifs, and observed ecosystem functioning. Each assembly motif describes a biotic environment in which species interactions have particular effects on a given ecosystem function....

Data from: Fungal endophytes of Vanilla planifolia across Réunion Island: isolation, distribution and biotransformation.

Shahnoo Khoyratty, Joëlle Dupont, Sandrine Lacoste, Tony L. Palama, Young H. Choi, Hye K. Kim, Bertrand Payet, Michel Grisoni, Mireille Fouillaud, Robert Verpoorte & Hippolyte Kodja
Background The objective of the work was to characterize fungal endophytes from aerial parts of Vanilla planifolia. Also, to establish their biotransformation abilities of flavor-related metabolites. This was done in order to find a potential role of endophytes on vanilla flavors. Results Twenty three MOTUs were obtained, representing 6 fungal classes. Fungi from green pods were cultured on mature green pod based media for 30 days followed by 1H NMR and HPLC-DAD analysis. All fungi...

Data from: The determinants of tropical forest deciduousness: disentangling the effects of rainfall and geology in central Africa

Dakis-Yaoba Ouédraogo, Adeline Fayolle, Sylvie Gourlet-Fleury, Frédéric Mortier, Vincent Freycon, Nicolas Fauvet, Suzanne Rabaud, Guillaume Cornu, Fabrice Bénédet, Jean-François Gillet, Richard Oslisly, Jean-Louis Doucet, Philippe Lejeune & Charly Favier
Understanding the environmental determinants of forests deciduousness i.e. proportion of deciduous trees in a forest stand, is of great importance when predicting the impact of ongoing global climate change on forests. In this study, we examine (i) how forest deciduousness varies in relation to rainfall and geology, and (ii) whether the influence of geology on deciduousness could be related to differences in soil fertility and water content between geological substrates. The study was conducted in...

Data from: Crop pests and predators exhibit inconsistent responses to surrounding landscape composition

Daniel S. Karp, Rebecca Chaplin-Kramer, Timothy D. Meehan, Emily A. Martin, Fabrice DeClerck, Heather Grab, Claudio Gratton, Lauren Hunt, Ashley E. Larsen, Alejandra Martínez-Salinas, Megan E. O’Rourke, Adrien Rusch, Katja Poveda, Mattias Jonsson, Jay A. Rosenheim, Nancy A. Schellhorn, Teja Tscharntke, Stephen D. Wratten, Wei Zhang, Aaron L. Iverson, Lynn S. Adler, Matthias Albrecht, Audrey Alignier, Gina M. Angelella, Muhammad Zubair Anjum … & Yi Zou
The idea that noncrop habitat enhances pest control and represents a win–win opportunity to conserve biodiversity and bolster yields has emerged as an agroecological paradigm. However, while noncrop habitat in landscapes surrounding farms sometimes benefits pest predators, natural enemy responses remain heterogeneous across studies and effects on pests are inconclusive. The observed heterogeneity in species responses to noncrop habitat may be biological in origin or could result from variation in how habitat and biocontrol are...

Data from: Ploidy and domestication are associated with genome size variation in Palms

Bee F. Gunn, Luc Baudouin, Thierry Beulé, Pascal Ilbert, Christophe Duperray, Michael Crisp, Auguste Issali, Jean-Louis Konan & Alain Rival
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: The genome size of a species (C-value) is associated with growth, development and adaptation to environmental changes. Angiosperm C-values range 1200-fold and frequently vary within species, although little is known about the impacts of domestication on genome size. Genome size variation among related species of palms is of evolutionary significance because changes characterize clades and may be associated with polyploidy, transposon amplifications, deletions, or rearrangements. Further knowledge of genome size will...

Data from: Tropical rainforests that persisted: inferences from the Quaternary demographic history of eight tree species in the Guiana shield

Stéphanie Barthe, Giorgio Binelli, Bruno Hérault, Caroline Scotti-Saintagne, Daniel Sabatier & Ivan Scotti
How Quaternary climatic and geological disturbances influenced the composition of Neotropical forests is hotly debated. Rainfall and temperature changes during and/or immediately after the last glacial maximum (LGM) are thought to have strongly affected the geographical distribution and local abundance of tree species. The paucity of the fossil records in Neotropical forests prevents a direct reconstruction of such processes. To describe community-level historical trends in forest composition, we turned therefore to inferential methods based on...

Data from: Taxonomic and functional composition of arthropod assemblages across contrasting Amazonian forests

P. A. Greg Lamarre, Bruno Hérault, Paul V. A. Fine, Vincent Vedel, Roland Lupoli, Italo Mesones, Christopher Baraloto & Greg P. A. Lamarre
Arthropods represent most of global biodiversity, with the highest diversity found in tropical rainforests. Nevertheless, we have a very incomplete understanding of how tropical arthropod communities are assembled. We conducted a comprehensive mass-sampling of arthropod communities within three major habitat types of lowland Amazonian rainforest, including terra firme clay, white-sand, and seasonally-flooded forests in Peru and French Guiana. We examined how taxonomic and functional composition (at the family level) differed across these habitat types in...

Data from: Understanding the recent colonization history of a plant pathogenic fungus using population genetic tools and Approximate Bayesian Computation

Benoit Barrès, Jean Carlier, Marc Seguin, Catherine Fenouillet, Christian Cilas & Viginie Ravigné
Understanding the processes by which new diseases are introduced in previously healthy areas is of major interest in elaborating prevention and management policies as well as in understanding the dynamics of pathogen diversity at large spatial scale. In this study, we aimed to decipher the dispersal processes that have led to the emergence of the plant pathogenic fungus Microcyclus ulei, which is responsible for the South American Leaf Blight (SALB) that has affected rubber trees...

Data from: Microsatellite evolutionary rate and pattern in Schistocerca gregaria inferred from direct observation of germline mutations

Marie-Pierre Chapuis, Christophe Plantamp, Réjane Streiff, Laurence Blondin, Cyril Piou & M.-P. Chapuis
Unravelling variation among taxonomic orders regarding the rate of evolution in microsatellites is crucial for evolutionary biology and population genetics research. The mean mutation rate of microsatellites tends to be lower in arthropods than in vertebrates, but data are scarce and mostly concern accumulation of mutations in model species. Based on parent-offspring segregations and a hierarchical Bayesian model, the mean rate of mutation in the orthopteran insect Schistocerca gregaria was estimated at 2.1e-4 per generation...

Data from: Architectural differences associated to functional traits among 45 coexisting tree species in central Africa

Grace Jopaul Loubota Panzou, Gauthier Ligot, Sylvie Gourlet-Fleury, Jean-Louis Doucet, Eric Forni, Jean-Joël Loumeto & Adeline Fayolle
1. Architectural traits that determine the light captured in a given environment are an important aspect of the life-history strategies of tropical tree species. In this study, we examined how interspecific variation in architectural traits is related to the functional traits of 45 coexisting tree species in central Africa. 2. At the tree level, we measured tree diameter, total height and crown dimensions for an average of 30 trees per species (range 14–72, total 968...

Data from: Artificial barriers prevent genetic recovery of small isolated populations of a low-mobility freshwater fish

Rhys A. Coleman, Bertrand Gauffre, Alexandra Pavlova, Luciano B. Beheregaray, Joanne Kearns, Jarod Lyon, Minami Sasaki, Raphael Leblois, Carla Sgro & Paul Sunnucks
Habitat loss and fragmentation often result in small, isolated populations vulnerable to environmental disturbance and loss of genetic diversity. Low genetic diversity can increase extinction risk of small populations by elevating inbreeding and inbreeding depression, and reducing adaptive potential. Due to their linear nature and extensive use by humans, freshwater ecosystems are especially vulnerable to habitat loss and fragmentation. Although the effects of fragmentation on genetic structure have been extensively studied in migratory fish, they...

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in landscape structure influences dispersal and genetic structure: empirical evidence from a grasshopper in an agricultural landscape

Bertrand Gauffre, Sophie Mallez, Marie-Pierre Chapuis, Leblois Raphael, Isabelle Litrico, Sabrina Delaunay, Isabelle Badenhausser & Raphael Leblois
Dispersal may be strongly influenced by landscape and habitat characteristics that could either enhance or restrict movements of organisms. Therefore, spatial heterogeneity in landscape structure could influence gene flow and the spatial structure of populations. In the past decades, agricultural intensification has led to the reduction in grassland surfaces, their fragmentation and intensification. As these changes are not homogeneously distributed in landscapes, they have resulted in spatial heterogeneity with generally less intensified hedged farmland areas...

Data from: Demographic processes shaping genetic variation of the solitarious phase of the desert locust

Marie-Pierre Chapuis, Christophe Plantamp, Laurence Blondin, Christine Pagès, Jean-Michel Vassal & Michel Lecoq
Between plagues, the solitarious desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria) is generally thought to exist as small populations, which are particularly prone to extinction events in arid regions of Africa and Asia. Given the high genetic structuring observed in one geographical area (the Eritrean coast) by former authors, a metapopulation dynamics model involving repeated extinction and colonization events was favored. In this study, we assessed the validity of a demographic scenario involving temporary populations of the solitarious...

Benefits and costs of hosting facultative symbionts in plant-sucking insects: a meta-analysis

Sharon Zytynska, Karim Tighiouart & Enric Frago
This dataset contains data from a meta-analysis on the benefits and costs of hosting secondar symbionts in plant-sucking insects, as described in the paper: "Zytynska, S.E., Tighiouart, K. & Frago, E. (2021) Benefits and costs of hosting facultative symbionts in plant-sucking insects: A meta-analysis. Molecular Ecology https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.15897 " Many animals have evolved associations with symbiotic microbes that benefit the host through increased growth, lifespan, and survival. Some interactions are obligate (essential for survival) while others...

High tree diversity enhances light interception in tropical forests

Marina Melo Duarte, Caroline Isaac Ferreira Zuim, Taísi Bech Sorrini, Luís Eduardo Bernardini, Rafael De Andrade Moral, Joannes Guillemot, Catherine Potvin, Wagner Hugo Bonat, José Luiz Stape & Pedro Henrique Santin Brancalion
We used two forest plantation experiments, the Sardinilla site in Panama (containing monocultures, 2-, 3- and 5-species mixtures in the main plantation, established in 2001, and 6-, 9- and18-species mixtures in the high-diversity plantation, established in 2003), and the Anhembi site in Brazil (established in 2006, containing 20-, 58- and 114-species mixtures), to investigate the effects of forest tree richness on the amount and distribution (horizontal, vertical and temporal) of intercepted ligh (red:far-red ratio -...

Data from: On the origin of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) genetic diversity in New Guinea, a secondary centre of diversity

Caroline Roullier, Rosa Kambouo, Janet Paofa, Doyle McKey & Vincent Lebot
New Guinea is considered the most important secondary centre of diversity for sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). We analysed nuclear and chloroplast genetic diversity of 417 New Guinea sweet potato landraces, representing agro-morphological diversity collected throughout the island, and compared this diversity with that in tropical America. The molecular data reveal moderate diversity across all accessions analysed, lower than that found in tropical America. Nuclear data confirm previous results, suggesting that New Guinea landraces are principally...

Data from: Asymmetric evolutionary responses to sex-specific selection in a hermaphrodite

Nicolás Bonel, Elsa Noël, Tim Janicke, Kevin Sartori, Elodie Chapuis, Adeline Ségard, Stefania Meconcelli, Benjamin Pélissié, Violette Sarda & Patrice David
Sex allocation theory predicts that simultaneous hermaphrodites evolve to an evolutionary stable resource allocation, whereby any increase in investment to male reproduction leads to a disproportionate cost on female reproduction and vice-versa. However, empirical evidence for sexual trade-offs in hermaphroditic animals is still limited. Here, we tested how male and female reproductive traits evolved under conditions of reduced selection on either male or female reproduction for 40 generations in a hermaphroditic snail. This selection favors...

Data from: Distribution and population structure of the anther smut fungus Microbotryum silenes-acaulis parasitizing an arctic-alpine plant

Britta Bueker, Chris Eberlein, Pierre Gladieux, Angela Schaefer, Alodie Snirc, Dominic Bennett, Dominik Begerow, Michael Hood, Tatiana Giraud & Dominic J. Bennett
Cold-adapted organisms with current arctic-alpine distributions have persisted during the last glaciation in multiple ice-free refugia, leaving footprints in their population structure that contrast with temperate plants and animals. However, pathogens that live within hosts having arctic-alpine distributions have been little studied. Here, we therefore investigated the geographical range and population structure of a fungus parasitizing an arctic-alpine plant. A total of 1437 herbarium specimens of the plant Silene acaulis were examined, and the anther...

Data from: Fine nurse variations explain discrepancies in the stress-interaction relationship in alpine regions

Fabien Anthelme, Rosa I. Meneses, Nerida N. Huaman Valero, Paola Pozo & Olivier Dangles
Despite a large consensus on increasing facilitation among plants with increasing stress in alpine regions, a number of different outcomes of interaction have been observed, which impedes the generalisation of the ‘stress-gradient hypothesis’ (SGH). With the aim to reconcile the different viewpoints on the stress-interaction relationship in alpine environments we hypothesized that fine nurse variations within a single life form (cushion) may explain this pattern variability To test this hypothesis, we compared the magnitude of...

Data from: Life-history traits of Macrolophus pygmaeus with different prey foods

Serigne Sylla, Karamoko Diarra & Thierry Brévault
Macrolophus pygmaeus Rambur (Hemiptera: Miridae) is a generalist predatory mirid widely used in augmentative biological control of various insect pests in greenhouse tomato production in Europe, including the invasive tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera, Gelechiidae). However, its biocontrol efficacy often relies on the presence of alternative prey. The present study aimed at evaluating the effect of various prey foods (Ephestia kuehniella eggs, Bemisia tabaci nymphs, Tuta absoluta eggs and Macrosiphum euphorbiae nymphs) on some...

Data from: Genetic mapping of two components of reproductive isolation between two sibling species of moths, Ostrinia nubilalis and O. scapulalis

Réjane Streiff, Brigitte Courtois, Serge Meusnier & Denis Bourguet
We report the quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of reproductive isolation traits between Ostrinia nubilalis (the European corn borer) and its sibling species O. scapulalis (the Adzuki bean borer), focusing on two traits: mating isolation (mi) and pheromone production (Pher). Four genetic maps were generated from two backcross families, with two maps (one chromosomal map and one linkage map) per backcross. We located 165–323 AFLP markers on these four maps, resulting in the identification of...

Data from: Historical collections reveal patterns of diffusion of sweet potato in Oceania obscured by modern plant movements and recombination

Caroline Roullier, Laure Benoit, Doyle B. McKey & Vincent Lebot
The history of sweet potato in the Pacific has long been an enigma. Archaeological, linguistic and ethnobotanical data suggest that prehistoric human-mediated dispersal events contributed to the distribution in Oceania of this American domesticate. According to the “tripartite hypothesis”, sweet potato was introduced into Oceania from South America in pre-Columbian times, and was then later newly introduced, and diffused widely across the Pacific, by Europeans via two historically documented routes from Mexico and the Caribbean....

Data from: Globally consistent impact of tropical cyclones on the structure of tropical and subtropical forests

Thomas Ibanez, Gunnar Keppel, Christophe Menkes, Thomas W. Gillespie, Matthieu Lengaigne, Morgan Mangeas, Gonzalo Rivas-Torres & Philippe Birnbaum
1. Tropical cyclones (TCs) are large-scale disturbances that regularly impact tropical forests. Although long-term impacts of TCs on forest structure have been proposed, a global test of the relationship between forest structure and TC frequency and intensity is lacking. We test on a pantropical scale whether TCs shape the structure of tropical and subtropical forests in the long-term. 2. We compiled forest structural features (stem density, basal area, mean canopy height and maximum tree size)...

Data from: The banana (Musa acuminata) genome and the evolution of monocotyledonous plants

Angelique D'Hont, France Denoeud, Jean-Marc Aury, Franc-Christophe Baurens, Françoise Carreel, Olivier Garsmeur, Benjamin Noel, Stéphanie Bocs, Gaëtan Droc, Mathieu Rouard, Corinne Da Silva, Jabbari Kamel, Céline Cardi, Julie Poulain, Marlène Souquet, Karine Labadie, Cyril Jourda, Juliette Lengellé, Marguerite Rodier-Goud, Adriana Alberti, Maria Bernard, Margot Correa, Saravanaraj Ayyampalayam, Michael R. McKain, Jim Leebens-Mack … & Patrick Wincker
Bananas (Musa spp.), including dessert and cooking types, are giant perennial monocotyledonous herbs of the order Zingiberales, a sister group to the well-studied Poales, which include cereals. Bananas are vital for food security in many tropical and subtropical countries and the most popular fruit in industrialized countries1. The Musa domestication process started some 7,000 years ago in Southeast Asia. It involved hybridizations between diverse species and subspecies, fostered by human migrations2, and selection of diploid...

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