96 Works

Drivers of longitudinal telomere dynamics in the long-lived bat species, Myotis myotis

Nicole Foley, Eric Petit, Thomas Brazier, John Finarelli, Graham Hughes, Frederic Touzalin, Sebastien Puechmaille & Emma Teeling
Age related telomere shortening is considered a hallmark of the ageing process. However, a recent cross-sectional ageing study of relative telomere length (rTL) in bats failed to detect a relationship between rTL and age in the long-lived genus Myotis (M. myotis and M. bechsteinii), suggesting some other factors are responsible for driving telomere dynamics in these species. Here, we test if longitudinal rTL data show signatures of age-associated telomere attrition in M. myotis and differentiate...

European bird declines: do we need to rethink approaches to the management of abundant generalist predators?

Barry John McMahon, Susan Doyle, Aimée Gray, Sean Kelly & Steve M. Redpath
Bird species are declining across Europe. Current European policy, i.e. the Birds and Habitats Directives, focus on habitat management as a way of halting the declines. This paper explores the role of predation in causing bird population declines and asks if we need to reconsider our approach to the management of generalist predators. We analysed bird population trends and distribution changes across Europe, Britain and Ireland, reflecting an increasing gradient of generalist predator abundance (principally...

Data from: Higher species richness enhances yield stability in intensively managed grasslands with experimental disturbance

Eamon Haughey, Matthias Suter, Daniel Hofer, Nyncke J. Hoekstra, Jennifer C. McElwain, Andreas Lüscher & John A. Finn
Climate models predict increased frequency and severity of drought events. At an Irish and Swiss site, experimental summer droughts were applied over two successive years to grassland plots sown with one, two or four grassland species with contrasting functional traits. Mean yield and plot-to-plot variance of yield were measured across harvests during drought and after a subsequent post-drought recovery period. At both sites, there was a positive relationship between species richness and yield. Under rainfed...

Data from: Long-term and trans-generational effects of neonatal experience on sheep behaviour

Michael Mendl, Corinna Clark, Joanna Murrell, Mia Fernyhough & Treasa O'Rourke
Early life experiences can have profound long-term, and sometimes trans-generational, effects on individual phenotypes. However, there is a relative paucity of knowledge about effects on pain sensitivity, even though these may impact on an individual's health and welfare, particularly in farm animals exposed to painful husbandry procedures. Here, we tested in sheep whether neonatal painful and non-painful challenges can alter pain sensitivity in adult life, and also in the next generation. Ewes exposed to tail-docking...

Data from: Fossilization of melanosomes via sulfurization

Maria E. McNamara, Bart E. Van Dongen, Nick P. Lockyer, Ian D. Bull & Patrick J. Orr
Fossil melanin granules (melanosomes) are an important resource for inferring the evolutionary history of colour and its functions in animals. The taphonomy of melanin and melanosomes, however, is incompletely understood. In particular, the chemical processes responsible for melanosome preservation have not been investigated. As a result, the origins of sulfur-bearing compounds in fossil melanosomes are difficult to resolve. This has implications for interpretations of original colour in fossils based on potential sulfur-rich phaeomelanosomes. Here we...

Data from: Quantifying and modelling decay in forecast proficiency indicates the limits of transferability in land-cover classification

Yoni Gavish, Jerome O’Connell, Tim G. Benton & Jerome O'Connell
1. The ability to provide reliable projections for the current and future distribution patterns of land-covers is fundamental if we wish to protect and manage our diminishing natural resources. Two inter-related revolutions made map productions feasible at unprecedented resolutions- the availability of high-resolution remotely-sensed data and the development of machine-learning algorithms. However, the ground-truth data needed for training models is in most cases spatially and temporally clustered. Therefore, map production requires extrapolation of models from...

Data from: Scale-dependent effects of landscape variables on gene flow and population structure in bats

Orly Razgour, Hugo Rebelo, Sébastien J. Puechmaille, Javier Juste, Carlos Ibáñez, Andreas Kiefer, Terry Burke, Deborah A. Dawson & Gareth Jones
Aim: A common pattern in biogeography is the scale-dependent effect of environmental variables on the spatial distribution of species. We tested the role of climatic and land cover variables in structuring the distribution of genetic variation in the grey long-eared bat, Plecotus austriacus, across spatial scales. Although landscape genetics has been widely used to describe spatial patterns of gene flow in a variety of taxa, volant animals have generally been neglected because of their perceived...

Data from: EMMLi: a maximum likelihood approach to the analysis of modularity

Anjali Goswami & John Albert Finarelli
Identification of phenotypic modules, semiautonomous sets of highly correlated traits, can be accomplished through exploratory (e.g., cluster analysis) or confirmatory approaches (e.g., RV coefficient analysis). Although statistically more robust, confirmatory approaches are generally unable to compare across different model structures. For example, RV coefficient analysis finds support for both two- and six-module models for the therian mammalian skull. Here, we present a maximum likelihood approach that takes into account model parameterization. We compare model log-likelihoods...

Data from: Breeding bird species diversity across gradients of land use from forest to agriculture in Europe

Matti J. Koivula, Dan E. Chamberlain, Robert J. Fuller, Stephen C. F. Palmer, Attila Bankovics, Fintan Bracken, Tom Bolger, Eduardo De Juana, Marc Montadert, Renato Neves, Rui Rufino, Angel Sallent, Luís Lopes Da Silva, Pedro J. Leitão, Manfred Steffen & Allan D. Watt
Loss, fragmentation and decreasing quality of habitats have been proposed as major threats to biodiversity world-wide, but relatively little is known about biodiversity responses to multiple pressures, particularly at very large spatial scales. We evaluated the relative contributions of four landscape variables (habitat cover, diversity, fragmentation and productivity) in determining different components of avian diversity across Europe. We sampled breeding birds in multiple 1-km2 landscapes, from high forest cover to intensive agricultural land, in eight...

Data from: Density and biotic interactions modify the combined effects of global and local stressors

Paul R. Brooks & Tasman P. Crowe
A key challenge in predicting the effects of global changes is determining how they may modify the influence of localised stressors, such that steps can be taken to minimise combined effects. Combined effects of global and local stressors can be difficult to predict as they are underpinned by influences on individual species and interactions between them, which in turn may be affected by absolute and relative densities. Here we tested experimentally the influence of increased...

Political Agreements in Internal Conflicts (PAIC) Dataset and Codebook

Giuditta Fontana, Argyro Kartsonaki, Natascha Neudorfer, Dawn Walsh, Stefan Wolff & Crystalla Yakinthou

Hyperspectral Imaging for the Detection of Microbial Spoilage of Mushrooms

Edurne Gaston, Jesus Maria Frias, Patrick Cullen, Colm O’Donnell & Aoife Gowen, University College Dublin Aoife Gowen, University College Dublin

Storage, Manipulation, and Visualization of LiDAR Data

Bianca Schoen-Phelan, M. Bertolotto, D. F. Laefer & Sean Corish

High diversity of mites (Acari: Oribatida, Mesostig-mata) supports the high conservation value of a broadleaf forest in Eastern Norway

Anna Seniczak, Stanisław Seniczak, Josef Starý, Sławomir Kaczmarek, Bjarte Jordal, Jarosław Kowalski, Steffen Roth, Per Djursvoll & Thomas Bolger
Broadleaf forests are critical habitats for biodiversity and this biodiversity is in turn essential for their proper functioning. Mites (Acari) are a numerous and functionally essential component of these forests. We report the diversity of two important groups, Oribatida and Mesostigmata, in a broadleaf forest in Eastern Norway which is considered to be a biodiversity hotspot. Eighteen samples, each 500 cm3, were collected from diverse microhabitats (moss on ground, lichens on tree twigs lying on...

Identification and evaluation of serum protein biomarkers which differentiate psoriatic from rheumatoid arthritis

Angela Mc Ardle
Objectives To identify serum protein biomarkers which might separate early inflammatory arthritis (EIA) patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) from those with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and may be used to support appropriate early intervention. Methods The serum proteome of patients with PsA and RA was interrogated using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (n=64 patients), a multiplexed antibody assay (Luminex) for 48 proteins (n=64 patients) and an aptamer-based assay (SOMAscan) targeting 1,129 proteins (n=36 patients). Multiple reaction...

Integrative genomics of the mammalian alveolar macrophage response to intracellular mycobacteria: RNA-seq statistics and results

David MacHugh, Thomas Hall, Michael Mullen, Gillian McHugo, Kate Killick, Donagh Berry, Siobhán Ring, Carolina Correia, John Browne & Stephen Gordon
Background: Bovine TB (bTB), caused by infection with Mycobacterium bovis, is a major endemic disease affecting global cattle production. The key innate immune cell that first encounters the pathogen is the alveolar macrophage, previously shown to be substantially reprogrammed during intracellular infection by the pathogen. Here we use differential expression, and correlation- and interaction-based network approaches to analyse the host response to infection with M. bovis at the transcriptome level to identify core infection response...

Machine annotation of sets of traditional Irish dance tunes

Bryan Duggan, Brendan O'Shea, Mikel Gainza & Padraig Cunningham

Data from: Identifying spawning sites and other critical habitat in lotic systems using eDNA “snapshots”: a case study using the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus L.

Fiona S.A. Bracken, Sean Rooney, Mary Kelly-Quinn, James J. King, Jens Carlsson & Fiona S. A. Bracken
Many aquatic species of conservation concern exist at low densities and are inherently difficult to detect or monitor using conventional methods. However, the introduction of environmental (e)DNA has recently transformed our ability to detect these species and enables effective deployment of limited conservation resources. Identifying areas for breeding, as well as the ecological distribution of a species are vital to the survival or recovery of a conservation species (i.e. critical habitat). In many species, spawning...

Data from: The program STRUCTURE does not reliably recover the correct population structure when sampling is uneven: sub-sampling and new estimators alleviate the problem

Sébastien J. Puechmaille
Inferences of population structure and more precisely the identification of genetically homogeneous groups of individuals are essential to the fields of ecology, evolutionary biology, and conservation biology. Such population structure inferences are routinely investigated via the program STRUCTURE implementing a Bayesian algorithm to identify groups of individuals at Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium. While the method is performing relatively well under various population models with even sampling between subpopulations, the robustness of the method to uneven...

Data from: Mammal madness: is the mammal tree of life not yet resolved?

Nicole M. Foley, Mark S. Springer & Emma C. Teeling
Most molecular phylogenetic studies place all placental mammals into four superordinal groups, Laurasiatheria (e.g. dogs, bats, whales), Euarchontoglires (e.g. humans, rodents, colugos), Xenarthra (e.g. armadillos, anteaters) and Afrotheria (e.g. elephants, sea cows, tenrecs), and estimate that these clades last shared a common ancestor 90–110 million years ago. This phylogeny has provided a framework for numerous functional and comparative studies. Despite the high level of congruence among most molecular studies, questions still remain regarding the position...

Data from: Population connectivity and phylogeography of the Mediterranean endemic skate Raja polystigma and evidence of its hybridization with the parapatric sibling R. montagui

Alessia Cariani, ED Farrell, P Carbonara, G Garofalo, M Stagioni, F Tinti, F Fiorentino, N Frodella, A Veloná, R Cannas & MC Follesa
The genetic structure and population connectivity of the Mediterranean endemic speckled skate Raja polystigma were investigated in 10 population samples (N = 232) at 7 exon-primed nuclear microsatellites and at 3 mitochondrial DNA sequence markers. The phylogeographic and population genetic analyses revealed that R. polystigma in the western and central Mediterranean represents a near-panmictic population, with a subtle but significant mitochondrial divergence of the Adriatic deme. Nuclear genotypes revealed that 2.5% of the total individuals...

Data from: Dispositional free riders do not free ride on punishment

Till O. Weber, Ori Weisel & Simon Gächter
Strong reciprocity explains prosocial cooperation by the presence of individuals who incur costs to help those who helped them (‘strong positive reciprocity’) and to punish those who wronged them (‘strong negative reciprocity’). Theories of social preferences predict that in contrast to ‘strong reciprocators’, self-regarding people cooperate and punish only if there are sufficient future benefits. Here, we test this prediction in a two-stage design. First, participants are classified according to their disposition towards strong positive...

Data from: Genomic characterisation of the indigenous Irish Kerry cattle breed

Sam Browett, Gillian McHugo, Ian W. Richardson, David A. Magee, Stephen D. E. Park, Alan G. Fahey, John F. Kearney, Carolina N. Correia, Imtiaz A.S. Randhawa, David E. MacHugh & Imtiaz A. S. Randhawa
Kerry cattle are an endangered landrace heritage breed of cultural importance to Ireland. In the present study we have used genome-wide SNP array data to evaluate genomic diversity within the Kerry population and between Kerry cattle and other European breeds. Patterns of genetic differentiation and gene flow among breeds using phylogenetic trees with ancestry graphs highlighted historical gene flow from the British Shorthorn breed into the ancestral population of modern Kerry cattle. Principal component analysis...

Worried, weary and worn out: a mixed methods study of stress and wellbeing in final year medical students

Abbie Lane, McGrath Jack, Cleary Emer, Guerandel Allys & Malone Kevin M.
Objectives: Although there is much focus on burnout and psychological distress amongst doctors, studies about stress and wellbeing in medical students are limited but could inform early intervention and prevention strategies. Design: The primary aim of this mixed methods, cross-sectional survey was to compare objective and subjective levels of stress in Final Year Medical students (2017) and to explore their perspectives on the factors they considered relevant to their wellbeing. Setting: University College Dublin, the...

Data from: Fear of the dark? contrasting impacts of humans vs lynx on diel activity of roe deer across Europe

Nadège C. Bonnot, Ophélie Couriot, Anne Berger, Francesca Cagnacci, Simone Ciuti, Johannes De Groeve, Benedikt Gehr, Marco Heurich, Petter Kjellander, Max Kröschel, Nicolas Morellet, Leif Sönnichsen & A.J. Mark Hewison
Humans, as super predators, can have strong effects on wildlife behaviour, including profound modifications of diel activity patterns. Subsequent to the return of large carnivores to human-modified ecosystems, many prey species have adjusted their spatial behaviour to the contrasting landscapes of fear generated by both their natural predators and anthropogenic pressures. The effects of predation risk on temporal shifts in diel activity of prey, however, remain largely unexplored in human-dominated landscapes. We investigated the influence...

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