100 Works

Data from: A non-lethal sampling method to obtain, generate and assemble whole-blood transcriptomes from small, wild mammals

Zixia Huang, Aurore Gallot, Nga T. Lao, Sébastien J. Puechmaille, Nicole M. Foley, David Jebb, Michaël Bekaert & Emma C. Teeling
The acquisition of tissue samples from wild populations is a constant challenge in conservation biology, especially for endangered species and protected species where nonlethal sampling is the only option. Whole blood has been suggested as a nonlethal sample type that contains a high percentage of bodywide and genomewide transcripts and therefore can be used to assess the transcriptional status of an individual, and to infer a high percentage of the genome. However, only limited quantities...

Data from: Genome sequencing and comparative analysis of three Chlamydia pecorum strains associated with different pathogenic outcomes

Michelle Sait, Morag Livingstone, Ewan M. Clark, Nick Wheelhouse, Lucy Spalding, Bryan Markey, Simone Magnino, F. Alex Lainson, Garry S. A. Myers & David Longbottom
Background: Chlamydia pecorum is the causative agent of a number of acute diseases, but most often causes persistent, subclinical infection in ruminants, swine and birds. In this study, the genome sequences of three C. pecorum strains isolated from the faeces of a sheep with inapparent enteric infection (strain W73), from the synovial fluid of a sheep with polyarthritis (strain P787) and from a cervical swab taken from a cow with metritis (strain PV3056/3) were determined...

Data from: Diversity dynamics of mammals in relation to tectonic and climatic history: comparison of three Neogene records from North America

Catherine Badgley & John A. Finarelli
In modern ecosystems, regions of topographic heterogeneity, when compared with nearby topographically homogeneous regions, support high species densities of mammals and other groups. This biogeographic pattern could be explained by either greater diversification rates or greater accommodation of species in topographically complex regions. In this context, we assess the hypothesis that changes in landscape history have stimulated diversification in mammals. Landscape history includes tectonic and climatic processes that influence topographic complexity at regional scales. We...

Data from: Spatiotemporal scaling of plant species richness and functional diversity in a temperate semi-natural grassland

Hannah J. White, W. Ian Montgomery, Robin J. Pakeman & Jack J. Lennon
The accumulation of biodiversity in space and time has been modelled extensively using the species-area relationship and the species-time relationship, respectively. Recently, these models have been combined into time-area curves in order to investigate spatiotemporal scaling of species richness. This study expands on previous research by applying these spatiotemporal models to functional diversity. Understanding spatiotemporal dynamics of ecological traits is important due to their crucial role in ecosystem functioning and mediating species responses to environmental...

Data from: Establishment of a coastal fish in the Azores: recent colonisation or sudden expansion of an ancient relict population?

Sergio Stefanni, Rita Castilho, Maria Sala-Bozano, Joana I. Robalo, Sara M. Francisco, Ricardo S. Santos, Nuno Marques, Alberto Brito, Vitor C. Almada & Stefano Mariani
The processes and timescales associated with ocean-wide changes in the distribution of marine species have intrigued biologists since Darwin’s earliest insights into biogeography. The Azores, a mid-Atlantic volcanic archipelago located >1000 km off the European continental shelf, offers ideal opportunities to investigate phylogeographic colonisation scenarios. The benthopelagic sparid fish known as the common two-banded seabream (Diplodus vulgaris) is now relatively common along the coastline of the Azores archipelago, but was virtually absent before the 1990s....

Data from: Genetic population structure of U.S. Atlantic coastal striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

David T. Gauthier, Corinne A. Audemard, Jeanette E. L. Carlsson, Tanya L. Darden, Michael R. Denson, Kimberly S. Reece & Jens Carlsson
Genetic population structure of anadromous striped bass along the US Atlantic coast was analyzed using 14 neutral nuclear DNA microsatellites. Young-of-the-year and adult striped bass (n = 1114) were sampled from Hudson River, Delaware River, Chesapeake Bay, North Carolina, and South Carolina. Analyses indicated clear population structure with significant genetic differentiation between all regions. Global multilocus F ST was estimated at 0.028 (P < 0.001). Population structure followed an isolation-by-distance model and temporal sampling indicated...

Data from: Yield of temperate forage grassland species is either largely resistant or resilient to experimental summer drought

Daniel Hofer, Matthias Suter, Eamon Haughey, John A. Finn, Nyncke J. Hoekstra, Nina Buchmann & Andreas Lüscher
Due to climate change, an increasing frequency and severity of drought events are expected to impair grassland productivity, particularly of intensively managed temperate grasslands. To assess drought impacts, a common field experiment to manipulate precipitation was set up at three sites (two Swiss and one Irish) using monocultures and mixtures with two and four key forage species. Species differed in their functional traits: a shallow-rooted non-legume (Lolium perenne L.), a deep-rooted non-legume (Cichorium intybus L.),...

Data from: Functional traits of marine macrophytes predict primary production

Holger Jänes, Jonne Kotta, Merli Pärnoja, Tasman P. Crowe, Fabio Rindi & Helen Orav-Kotta
The relationship between community structure and the functioning of ecosystems is the subject of ongoing debate. Biological or functional trait-based approaches that capture life strategy, morphology and behavioural characteristics have received far less attention than taxonomic diversity in this context, despite their more intuitive link to ecosystem functioning. Macrophyte primary production underpins aquatic food webs, regulates benthic and pelagic ecosystems and is a key aspect of the global carbon cycle. This study spans a range...

Data from: Leptin regulation of hippocampal synaptic function in health and disease

Andrew J. Irving & Jenni Harvey
The endocrine hormone leptin plays a key role in regulating food intake and body weight via its actions in the hypothalamus. However, leptin receptors are highly expressed in many extra-hypothalamic brain regions and evidence is growing that leptin influences many central processes including cognition. Indeed, recent studies indicate that leptin is a potential cognitive enhancer as it markedly facilitates the cellular events underlying hippocampal-dependent learning and memory, including effects on glutamate receptor trafficking, neuronal morphology...

Machine annotation of sets of traditional Irish dance tunes

Bryan Duggan, Brendan O'Shea, Mikel Gainza & Padraig Cunningham

Gathering Datasets for Activity Identification

Lorcan Coyle, Juan Ye, Susan McKeever, Stephen Knox, Mathew Staelber, Simon Dobson & Paddy Nixon

ECUE: a spam filter that uses machine learning to track concept drift

Sarah Jane Delany, Padraig Cunningham & Barry Smyth

Virtual Personal Assistants in a Pervasive Computing World

John Bradley, Brian R. Duffy, Gregory O'Hare, Alan Martin & Bianca Schoen-Phelan

Empowering Agents within Virtual Environments

Alan Martin, Brian Duffy, Gregory O'Hare, Bianca Schoen-Phelan & John Bradley

Data from: Dispositional free riders do not free ride on punishment

Till O. Weber, Ori Weisel & Simon Gächter
Strong reciprocity explains prosocial cooperation by the presence of individuals who incur costs to help those who helped them (‘strong positive reciprocity’) and to punish those who wronged them (‘strong negative reciprocity’). Theories of social preferences predict that in contrast to ‘strong reciprocators’, self-regarding people cooperate and punish only if there are sufficient future benefits. Here, we test this prediction in a two-stage design. First, participants are classified according to their disposition towards strong positive...

Data from: The program STRUCTURE does not reliably recover the correct population structure when sampling is uneven: sub-sampling and new estimators alleviate the problem

Sébastien J. Puechmaille
Inferences of population structure and more precisely the identification of genetically homogeneous groups of individuals are essential to the fields of ecology, evolutionary biology, and conservation biology. Such population structure inferences are routinely investigated via the program STRUCTURE implementing a Bayesian algorithm to identify groups of individuals at Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium. While the method is performing relatively well under various population models with even sampling between subpopulations, the robustness of the method to uneven...

Data from: Identifying spawning sites and other critical habitat in lotic systems using eDNA “snapshots”: a case study using the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus L.

Fiona S.A. Bracken, Sean Rooney, Mary Kelly-Quinn, James J. King, Jens Carlsson & Fiona S. A. Bracken
Many aquatic species of conservation concern exist at low densities and are inherently difficult to detect or monitor using conventional methods. However, the introduction of environmental (e)DNA has recently transformed our ability to detect these species and enables effective deployment of limited conservation resources. Identifying areas for breeding, as well as the ecological distribution of a species are vital to the survival or recovery of a conservation species (i.e. critical habitat). In many species, spawning...

Data from: Genomic characterisation of the indigenous Irish Kerry cattle breed

Sam Browett, Gillian McHugo, Ian W. Richardson, David A. Magee, Stephen D. E. Park, Alan G. Fahey, John F. Kearney, Carolina N. Correia, Imtiaz A.S. Randhawa, David E. MacHugh & Imtiaz A. S. Randhawa
Kerry cattle are an endangered landrace heritage breed of cultural importance to Ireland. In the present study we have used genome-wide SNP array data to evaluate genomic diversity within the Kerry population and between Kerry cattle and other European breeds. Patterns of genetic differentiation and gene flow among breeds using phylogenetic trees with ancestry graphs highlighted historical gene flow from the British Shorthorn breed into the ancestral population of modern Kerry cattle. Principal component analysis...

Data from: Mammal madness: is the mammal tree of life not yet resolved?

Nicole M. Foley, Mark S. Springer & Emma C. Teeling
Most molecular phylogenetic studies place all placental mammals into four superordinal groups, Laurasiatheria (e.g. dogs, bats, whales), Euarchontoglires (e.g. humans, rodents, colugos), Xenarthra (e.g. armadillos, anteaters) and Afrotheria (e.g. elephants, sea cows, tenrecs), and estimate that these clades last shared a common ancestor 90–110 million years ago. This phylogeny has provided a framework for numerous functional and comparative studies. Despite the high level of congruence among most molecular studies, questions still remain regarding the position...

Data from: Can biosecurity and local network properties predict pathogen species richness in the salmonid industry?

Tadaishi Yatabe, Simon J. More, Fiona Geoghegan, Catherine McManus, Ashley E. Hill & Beatriz Martinez-Lopez
Salmonid farming in Ireland is mostly organic, which implies limited disease treatment options. This highlights the importance of biosecurity for preventing the introduction and spread of infectious agents. Similarly, the effect of local network properties on infection spread processes has rarely been evaluated. In this paper, we characterized the biosecurity of salmonid farms in Ireland using a survey, and then developed a score for benchmarking the disease risk of salmonid farms. The usefulness and validity...

Data from: Population connectivity and phylogeography of the Mediterranean endemic skate Raja polystigma and evidence of its hybridization with the parapatric sibling R. montagui

Alessia Cariani, ED Farrell, P Carbonara, G Garofalo, M Stagioni, F Tinti, F Fiorentino, N Frodella, A Veloná, R Cannas & MC Follesa
The genetic structure and population connectivity of the Mediterranean endemic speckled skate Raja polystigma were investigated in 10 population samples (N = 232) at 7 exon-primed nuclear microsatellites and at 3 mitochondrial DNA sequence markers. The phylogeographic and population genetic analyses revealed that R. polystigma in the western and central Mediterranean represents a near-panmictic population, with a subtle but significant mitochondrial divergence of the Adriatic deme. Nuclear genotypes revealed that 2.5% of the total individuals...

Data from: Forecasting the response to global warming in a heat-sensitive species

Francesca Brivio, Milena Zurmühl, Stefano Grignolio, Jost Von Hardenberg, Marco Apollonio & Simone Ciuti
Avoiding hyperthermia entails considerable metabolic costs for endotherms. Such costs increase in warm conditions, when endotherms may trade food intake for cooler areas to avoid heat stress and maximize their energy balance. The need to reduce heat stress may involve the adoption of tactics affecting space use and foraging behaviour, which are important to understand and predict the effects of climate change and inform conservation. We used resource selection models to examine the behavioural response...

Data from: Fear of the dark? contrasting impacts of humans vs lynx on diel activity of roe deer across Europe

Nadège C. Bonnot, Ophélie Couriot, Anne Berger, Francesca Cagnacci, Simone Ciuti, Johannes De Groeve, Benedikt Gehr, Marco Heurich, Petter Kjellander, Max Kröschel, Nicolas Morellet, Leif Sönnichsen & A.J. Mark Hewison
Humans, as super predators, can have strong effects on wildlife behaviour, including profound modifications of diel activity patterns. Subsequent to the return of large carnivores to human-modified ecosystems, many prey species have adjusted their spatial behaviour to the contrasting landscapes of fear generated by both their natural predators and anthropogenic pressures. The effects of predation risk on temporal shifts in diel activity of prey, however, remain largely unexplored in human-dominated landscapes. We investigated the influence...

Worried, weary and worn out: a mixed methods study of stress and wellbeing in final year medical students

Abbie Lane, McGrath Jack, Cleary Emer, Guerandel Allys & Malone Kevin M.
Objectives: Although there is much focus on burnout and psychological distress amongst doctors, studies about stress and wellbeing in medical students are limited but could inform early intervention and prevention strategies. Design: The primary aim of this mixed methods, cross-sectional survey was to compare objective and subjective levels of stress in Final Year Medical students (2017) and to explore their perspectives on the factors they considered relevant to their wellbeing. Setting: University College Dublin, the...

Integrative genomics of the mammalian alveolar macrophage response to intracellular mycobacteria: RNA-seq statistics and results

David MacHugh, Thomas Hall, Michael Mullen, Gillian McHugo, Kate Killick, Donagh Berry, Siobhán Ring, Carolina Correia, John Browne & Stephen Gordon
Background: Bovine TB (bTB), caused by infection with Mycobacterium bovis, is a major endemic disease affecting global cattle production. The key innate immune cell that first encounters the pathogen is the alveolar macrophage, previously shown to be substantially reprogrammed during intracellular infection by the pathogen. Here we use differential expression, and correlation- and interaction-based network approaches to analyse the host response to infection with M. bovis at the transcriptome level to identify core infection response...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    34
  • 2020
    14
  • 2019
    6
  • 2018
    9
  • 2017
    7
  • 2016
    11
  • 2015
    5
  • 2014
    4
  • 2013
    5
  • 2012
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    73
  • Text
    27

Affiliations

  • University College Dublin
    99
  • Technological University Dublin
    19
  • Queen's University Belfast
    6
  • University of Bristol
    6
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    4
  • University College Cork
    4
  • University of Tartu
    3
  • University of Limerick
    2
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • University of Aberdeen
    2