4 Works

Data from: Locomotory abilities and habitat of the Cretaceous bird Gansus yumenensis inferred from limb length proportions

Robert L. Nudds, Jessie Atterholt, Xia Wang, H. L. You, Gareth J. Dyke & H.-L. You
The relative length proportions of the three bony elements of the pelvic (femur, tibiotarsus and tarsometatarsus) and pectoral (humerus, ulna and manus) limbs of the early Cretaceous bird Gansus yumenensis, a well-represented basal ornithuromorph from China are investigated and compared to those of extant taxa. Ternary plots show that the pectoral limb length proportions of Gansus are most similar to Apodiformes (swifts and hummingbirds), which plot away from all other extant birds. In contrast, the...

Data from: Reconstruction of caribou evolutionary history in Western North America and its implications for conservation

Byron V. Weckworth, Marco Musiani, Allan D. McDevitt, Mark Hebblewhite & Stefano Mariani
The role of Beringia as a refugium and route for trans-continental exchange of fauna during glacial cycles of the past 2 million years are well documented; less apparent is its contribution as a significant reservoir of genetic diversity. Using mitochondrial DNA sequences and 14 microsatellite loci, we investigate the phylogeographic history of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) in western North America. Patterns of genetic diversity reveal two distinct groups of caribou. Caribou classified as a Northern group,...

Data from: Genetic drift and collective dispersal can result in chaotic genetic patchiness

Thomas Broquet, Frédérique Viard & Jonathan M. Yearsley
Chaotic genetic patchiness denotes unexpected patterns of genetic differentiation that are observed at a fine scale and are not stable in time. These patterns have been described in marine species with free-living larvae, but are unexpected because they occur at a scale below the dispersal range of pelagic larvae. At the scale where most larvae are immigrants, theory predicts spatially homogeneous, temporally stable genetic variation. Empirical studies have suggested that genetic drift interacts with complex...

Data from: Idiosyncratic species effects confound size-based predictions of responses to climate change

Marion Twomey, Eva Brodte, Ute Jacob, Ulrich Brose, Tasman P. Crowe & Mark C. Emmerson
Understanding and predicting the consequences of warming for complex ecosystems and indeed individual species remains a major ecological challenge. Here, we investigated the effect of increased seawater temperatures on the metabolic and consumption rates of five distinct marine species. The experimental species reflected different trophic positions within a typical benthic East Atlantic food web, and included a herbivorous gastropod, a scavenging decapod, a predatory echinoderm, a decapod and a benthic-feeding fish. We examined the metabolism–body...

Registration Year

  • 2012
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University College Dublin
    4
  • Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology
    1
  • University of Montana
    1
  • University of Pennsylvania
    1
  • University of Hamburg
    1
  • Queen's University Belfast
    1
  • University of Southampton
    1
  • University of Göttingen
    1
  • University of Manchester
    1
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    1