5 Works

Data from: First measurements of field metabolic rate in wild juvenile fishes show strong thermal sensitivity but variations between sympatric ecotypes

Ming-Tsung Chung, Kris‐Emil Mose Jørgensen, Clive N. Trueman, Halvor Knutsen, Per Erik Jorde & Peter Grønkjær
The relationship between physiology and temperature has a large influence on population-level responses to climate change. In natural settings, direct thermal effects on metabolism may be exaggerated or offset by behavioural responses influencing individual energy balance. Drawing on a newly developed proxy, we provide the first estimates of the thermal performance curve of field metabolism in a wild fish. We investigate the thermal sensitivity of field metabolic rate in two sympatric, genetically distinct ecotypes of...

Resource-driven colonization by cod in a high Arctic food web

Edda Johannesen, Nigel Yoccoz, Torkild Tveraa, Nancy Shackell, Kari Ellingsen, Andrey Dolgov & Kenneth Frank
Climate change is commonly associated with many species redistributions and the influence of other factors may be marginalized, especially in the rapidly warming Arctic. The Barents Sea, a high latitude large marine ecosystem in the Northeast Atlantic has experienced above average temperatures since the mid 2000’s with divergent bottom temperature trends at sub-regional scales. Concurrently, the Barents Sea stock of Atlantic cod Gadus morhua, one of the most important commercial fish stocks in the world,...

Data from: Marine protected areas rescue a sexually selected trait in European lobster

Tonje Knutsen Sørdalen, Kim Tallaksen Halvorsen, Leif Asbjørn Vøllestad, Even Moland & Esben Moland Olsen
Marine protected areas (MPAs) are increasingly implemented worldwide to maintain and restore depleted populations. However, despite our knowledge on the myriad of positive responses to protection, there are few empirical studies on the ability to conserve species’ mating patterns and secondary sexual traits. In male European lobsters (Homarus gammarus), the size of claws relative to body size correlates positively with male mating success and is presumably under sexual selection. At the same time, an intensive...

Data from: Ecological impact assessments of alien species in Norway

Hanno Sandvik, Olga Hilmo, Snorre Henriksen, Reidar Elven, Per Arvid Åsen, Hanne Hegre, Oddvar Pedersen, Per Anker Pedersen, Heidi Solstad, Vigdis Vandvik, Kristine B. Westergaard, Frode Ødegaard, Sandra Åström, Hallvard Elven, Anders Endrestøl, Øivind Gammelmo, Bjørn Arild Hatteland, Halvor Solheim, Björn Nordén, Leif Sundheim, Venche Talgø, Tone Falkenhaug, Bjørn Gulliksen, Anders Jelmert, Eivind Oug … & Lisbeth Gederaas
Due to globalisation, trade and transport, the spread of alien species is increasing dramatically. Some alien species become ecologically harmful by threatening native biota. This can lead to irreversible changes in local biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, and, ultimately, to biotic homogenisation. We risk-assessed all alien plants, animals, fungi and algae, within certain delimitations, that are known to reproduce in Norway. Mainland Norway and the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard plus Jan Mayen were treated as separate...

Timing is everything: survival of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) postsmolts during events of high salmon lice densities

Thomas Bøhn, Karl Øystein Gjelland, Rosa Serra-Llinares, Bengt Finstad, Raul Primicerio, Rune Nilsen, Ørjan Karlsen, Anne Sandvik, Ove Skilbrei, Kristine Marit Elvik, Øystein Skaala & Pål Bjørn
Atlantic salmon in aquaculture act as reservoir hosts and vectors of parasites like salmon lice and this parasite is shown to harm wild salmonid populations. In the present study, n=29817 tagged Atlantic salmon were studied in four release trials. Half of the released fish were given prophylactic treatment against lice, the other half represented sham control fish. We used a nested design comparing years with low and high lice density and seasonal dynamics in infestation...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    5

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    5

Affiliations

  • Institute of Marine Research
    5
  • The Arctic University of Norway
    3
  • Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
    3
  • University of Oslo
    2
  • University of Agder
    2
  • Aarhus University
    1
  • University of Southampton
    1
  • Marine Research Institute
    1
  • Bedford Institute of Oceanography
    1
  • Norwegian Institute for Water Research
    1