14 Works

Data from: Moving in the Anthropocene: global reductions in terrestrial mammalian movements

Marlee A. Tucker, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, William F. Fagan, John M. Fryxell, Bram Van Moorter, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Andrew M. Allen, Nina Attias, Tal Avgar, Hattie Bartlam-Brooks, Buuveibaatar Bayarbaatar, Jerrold L. Belant, Alessandra Bertassoni, Dean Beyer, Laura Bidner, Floris M. Van Beest, Stephen Blake, Niels Blaum, Chloe Bracis, Danielle Brown, P. J. Nico De Bruyn, Francesca Cagnacci, Justin M. Calabrese, Constança Camilo-Alves … & Thomas Mueller
Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint were on average one-half to one-third the extent of their movements in areas with a low human footprint. We attribute this reduction to behavioral...

Data from: Social and ecological drivers of reproductive seasonality in geladas

Elizabeth Tinsley Johnson, Noah Snyder-Mackler, Amy Lu, Thore J. Bergman & Jacinta C. Beehner
Many non-seasonally breeding mammals demonstrate some degree of synchrony in births, which is generally associated with ecological factors that mediate fecundity. However, disruptive social events, such as alpha male replacements, also have the potential to affect the timing of female reproduction. Here, we examined reproductive seasonality in a wild population of geladas (Theropithecus gelada) living at high altitudes in an afro-alpine ecosystem in Ethiopia. Using 9 years of demographic data (2006-2014) we determined that, while...

Data from: Using the wax moth larva Galleria mellonella infection model to detect emerging bacterial pathogens

Rafael J. Hernandez, Elze Hesse, Andrea J. Dowling, Nicola M. Coyle, Edward J. Feil, Will H. Gaze & Michiel Vos
Climate change, changing farming practices, social and demographic changes and rising levels of antibiotic resistance are likely to lead to future increases in opportunistic bacterial infections that are more difficult to treat. Uncovering the prevalence and identity of pathogenic bacteria in the environment is key to assessing transmission risks. We describe the first use of the Wax moth larva Galleria mellonella, a well-established model for the mammalian innate immune system, to selectively enrich and characterize...

Data from: Fires in protected areas reveal unforeseen costs of Colombian peace

Dolors Armenteras, Laura Schneider & Liliana María Dávalos
Armed conflict, and its end, can have powerful effects on natural resources, but the influence of war and peace on highly biodiverse tropical forests remains disputed. We found a sixfold increase in fires in protected areas across biodiversity hotspots following guerrilla demobilization in Colombia, and a 52% increase in the probability of per-pixel deforestation within parks for 2018. Peace requires urgent shifts to include real-time forest monitoring, expand programmes to pay for ecosystem services at...

Data from: Debugging diversity – a pan‐continental exploration of the potential of terrestrial blood‐feeding leeches as a vertebrate monitoring tool

Ida Bærholm Schnell, Kristine Bohmann, Sebastian E. Schultze, Stine R. Richter, Dáithí C. Murray, Mikkel-Holger S. Sinding, David Bass, John E. Cadle, Mason J. Campbell, Rainer Dulch, David P. Edwards, Thomas N. E. Gray, Teis Hansen, Anh N. Q. Hoa, Christina Lehmkuhl Noer, Sigrid Heise-Pavlov, Adam F. Sander Pedersen, Juliot C. Ramamonjisoa, Mark E. Siddall, Andrew Tilker, Carl Traeholt, Nicholas Wilkinson, Paul Woodcock, Douglas W. Yu, Mads Frost Bertelsen … & Ida Baerholm Schnell
The use of environmental DNA (eDNA) has become an applicable non-invasive tool with which to obtain information about biodiversity. A sub-discipline of eDNA is iDNA (invertebrate-derived DNA), where genetic material ingested by invertebrates is used to characterise the biodiversity of the species that served as hosts. While promising, these techniques are still in their infancy, as they have only been explored on limited numbers of samples from only a single or a few different locations....

Data from: A comprehensive analysis of autocorrelation and bias in home range estimation

Michael J. Noonan, Marlee A. Tucker, Christen H. Fleming, Tom S. Akre, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Jeanne Altmann, Pamela C. Antunes, Jerrold L. Belant, Dean Beyer, Niels Blaum, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, , Rogerio De Paula Cunha, Jasja Dekker, Jonathan Drescher-Lehman, Nina Farwig, Claudia Fichtel, Christina Fischer, Adam T. Ford, Jacob R. Goheen, René Janssen, Florian Jeltsch, Matthew Kauffman, Peter M. Kappeler … & Justin M. Calabrese
Home range estimation is routine practice in ecological research. While advances in animal tracking technology have increased our capacity to collect data to support home range analysis, these same advances have also resulted in increasingly autocorrelated data. Consequently, the question of which home range estimator to use on modern, highly autocorrelated tracking data remains open. This question is particularly relevant given that most estimators assume independently sampled data. Here, we provide a comprehensive evaluation of...

Data from: Strength of selection on Trpc2 gene predicts accessory olfactory bulb form in bat vomeronasal evolution

Laurel R. Yohe & Liliana M. Davalos
Vestigial characters are common across the tree of life, but the underlying evolutionary processes shaping phenotypic loss are poorly understood. The mammalian vomeronasal system, which detects social chemical cues important to fitness, is an impressive example of a sensory system lost multiple times. Three times more losses are inferred among bats than in other mammalian orders. We characterized the relationship between amino acid substitutions in a gene tightly linked to vomeronasal function (Trpc2) and the...

Data from: Correlation of native and exotic species richness: a global meta-analysis finds no invasion paradox across scales

Shijia Peng, Nicole L. Kinlock, Jessica Gurevitch, Shao-Lin Peng & Shaolin Peng
Support for the “biotic resistance hypothesis,” that species-rich communities are more successful at resisting invasion by exotic species than are species-poor communities, has long been debated. It has been argued that native-exotic richness relationships (NERR) are negative at small spatial scales and positive at large scales, but evidence for the role of spatial scale on NERR has been contradictory. However, no formal quantitative synthesis has previously examined whether NERR is scale-dependent across multiple studies, and...

Data from: A function-valued trait approach to estimating the genetic basis of size at age and its potential role in fisheries induced evolution

Jin Gao & Stephan B. Munch
Natural selection is inherently a multivariate phenomenon. The selection pressure on size (natural and artificial) and the age at which selection occurs is likely to induce evolutionary changes in growth rates across the entire life history. However, the covariance structure that will determine the path of evolution for size-at-age has been studied in only a few fish species. We therefore estimated the genetic covariance function for size throughout ontogeny using Atlantic silversides (Menidia menidia) as...

Data from: Estimating infection prevalence: best practices and their theoretical underpinnings

Ian F. Miller, India Schneider-Crease, Charles L. Nunn & Michael P. Muehlenbein
Accurately estimating infection prevalence is fundamental to the study of population health, disease dynamics, and infection risk factors. Prevalence is estimated as the proportion of infected individuals (“individual-based estimation”), but is also estimated as the proportion of samples from which the disease-causing organisms are recovered (“anonymous estimation”). The latter method is often used when researchers lack information on individual host identity, which can occur during noninvasive sampling of wild populations or when the individual that...

Data from: Questioning assumptions of trophic behavior in a broadly ranging marine predator guild

Oliver N. Shipley, Jill A. Olin, Mike Power, Robert M. Cerrato, Michael G. Frisk, Robert. M. Cerrato & Michael Power
We evaluated whether existing assumptions regarding the trophic ecology of a poorly-studied predator guild, northwest (NW) Atlantic skates (family: Rajidae), were supported across broad geographic scales. Four hypotheses were tested using carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) stable isotope values as metrics of foraging behavior: 1) species exhibit ontogenetic shifts in habitat and thus display a shift in 13C with differential use of the continental shelf; 2) species exhibit ontogenetic prey shifts (i.e., from smaller to...

Data from: Multifactorial processes underlie parallel opsin loss in neotropical bats

Alexa Sadier, Kalina T. J. Davies, Laurel R. Yohe, Kun Yun, Paul Donat, Brandon P. Hedrick, Elizabeth R. Dumont, Liliana M. Davalos, Stephen J. Rossiter & Karen E. Sears
The loss of previously adaptive traits is typically linked to relaxation in selection, yet the molecular steps leading to such repeated losses are rarely known. Molecular studies of loss have tended to focus on gene sequences alone, but overlooking other aspects of protein expression might underestimate phenotypic diversity. Insights based almost solely on opsin gene evolution, for instance, have made mammalian color vision a textbook example of phenotypic loss. We address this gap by investigating...

Data from: Estimation of energetic condition in wild baboons using fecal thyroid hormone determination

Laurence R. Gesquiere, Mya Pugh, Susan C. Alberts & A. Catherine Markham
Understanding how environmental and social factors affect reproduction through variation in energetic condition remains understudied in wild animals, in large part because accurately and repeatedly measuring energetic condition in the wild is a challenge. Thyroid hormones (THs), such as triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), have a key role in mitigating metabolic responses to energy intake and expenditure, and therefore are considered important biomarkers of an animal's energetic condition. Recent method development has shown that T3...

Data from: Fruiting phenology is linked to rainfall variability in a tropical rain forest

Amy E. Dunham, Onja H. Razafindratsima, Paul Rakotonirina, Patricia C. Wright. & Patricia C. Wright
As the influence of climate change on tropical forests becomes apparent, more studies are needed to understand how changes in climatic variables like rainfall are likely to affect tree phenology. Using a twelve-year dataset (2005–2016), we studied the impact of seasonal rainfall patterns on the fruiting phenology of 69 tree species in the rain forest of southeastern Madagascar. We found that average annual rainfall in this region has increased by >800mm (23%) during this period...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • Stony Brook University
    14
  • Duke University
    4
  • Princeton University
    3
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    2
  • University of Washington
    2
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    2
  • Michigan Department of Natural Resources
    2
  • Senckenberg Nature Research Society
    2
  • University of Wyoming
    2
  • University of Bath
    1