6 Works

Data from: Molecular phylogeny of Squaliformes and first occurrence of bioluminescence in sharks

Nicolas Straube, Chenhong Li, Julien M. Claes, Shannon Corrigan & Gavin J. P. Naylor
Background: Squaliform sharks represent approximately 27 % of extant shark diversity, comprising more than 130 species with a predominantly deep-dwelling lifestyle. Many Squaliform species are highly specialized, including some that are bioluminescent, a character that is reported exclusively from Squaliform sharks within Chondrichthyes. The interfamiliar relationships within the order are still not satisfactorily resolved. Herein we estimate the phylogenetic interrelationships of a generic level sampling of “squaloid” sharks and closely related taxa using aligned sequences...

Data from: Auxotrophy and intra-population complementary in the 'interactome' of a cultivated freshwater model community

Sarahi L. Garcia, Moritz Buck, Katherine D. McMahon, Hans-Peter Grossart, Alexander Eiler & Falk Warnecke
Microorganisms are usually studied either in highly complex natural communities or in isolation as monoclonal model populations that we manage to grow in the laboratory. Here, we uncover the biology of some of the most common and yet-uncultured bacteria in freshwater environments using a mixed culture from Lake Grosse Fuchskuhle. From a single shotgun metagenome of a freshwater mixed culture of low complexity, we recovered four high-quality metagenome-assembled genomes (MAGs) for metabolic reconstruction. This analysis...

Data from: Bacterial diversity amplifies nutrient-based plant-soil feedbacks

Simone Weidner, Robert Koller, Ellen Latz, George Kowalchuk, Michael Bonkowski, Stefan Scheu & Alexandre Jousset
Plants foster diverse assemblages of bacteria in the rhizosphere serving important functions which may result in enhanced plant growth. Microbial diversity is increasingly recognized to shape the functionality of microbial communities. This leads to the assumption that there is a positive relationship between rhizosphere diversity and plant growth. Here we investigate how bacterial diversity affects the mineralization of organic matter and plant nutrient acquisition. We hypothesized that altered bacterial diversity will affect nitrogen mineralisation, uptake...

Data from: Effects of management on aquatic tree-hole communities in temperate forests are mediated by detritus amount and water chemistry

Martin M. Gossner, Peggy Lade, Anja Rohland, Nora Sichardt, Tiemo Kahl, Jürgen Bauhus, Wolfgang W. Weisser & Jana S. Petermann
1. Arthropod communities in water-filled tree-holes may be sensitive to impacts of forest management, for example via changes in environmental conditions such as resource input. 2. We hypothesized that increasing forest management intensity negatively affects arthropod abundance and richness and shifts community composition and trophic structure of tree-hole communities. We predicted that this shift is caused by reduced habitat and resource availability at the forest stand scale as well as reduced tree-hole size, detritus amount...

Data from: Individual behaviour mediates effects of warming on movement across a fragmented landscape

Andrew D. Barnes, Ina-Kathrin Spey, Lena Rohde, Ulrich Brose & Anthony I. Dell
Global warming and habitat fragmentation impose dramatic and potentially interactive impacts on ecosystems. Warming induces shifts in species' distributions as they track temperature changes, but this can be hindered in fragmented landscapes. Corridors connecting habitat patches might ameliorate the combined effects of fragmentation and global warming. Using novel automated tracking methods, the movement of woodlice (Oniscus asellus) ranging in body size from 15·3 to 108·6 mg was quantified across a temperature range from 15 to...

Data from: Plasticity and epistasis strongly affect bacterial fitness after losing multiple metabolic genes

Glen D’Souza, Silvio Waschina, Christoph Kaleta, Christian Kost & Glen D'Souza
Many bacterial lineages lack seemingly essential metabolic genes. Previous work suggested selective benefits could drive the loss of biosynthetic functions from bacterial genomes when the corresponding metabolites are sufficiently available in the environment. However, the factors that govern this ‘genome streamlining’ remain poorly understood. Here we determine the effect of plasticity and epistasis on the fitness of Escherichia coli genotypes from whose genome biosynthetic genes for one, two, or three different amino acids have been...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Friedrich Schiller University Jena
    6
  • University of Cologne
    1
  • Hollings Marine Laboratory
    1
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    1
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    1
  • University of Göttingen
    1
  • University of Freiburg
    1
  • Université Catholique de Louvain
    1
  • Berlin Brandenburg Institute of Advanced Biodiversity Research
    1
  • Technical University Munich
    1