51 Works

Data from: The underappreciated role of life history in mediating the functional consequences of biodiversity change

Matthew E.S. Bracken, Susan L. Williams & Matthew E. S. Bracken
Biodiversity is changing on both global and local scales, motivating research to understand the consequences of these changes for how communities and ecosystems function. Here, we explore the role of life history strategies in mediating biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. In particular, we evaluate how the composition, biomass (% cover), and richness of perennial (persistence ≥ 1 year) and ephemeral (persistence < 1 year) species change along a gradient of increasing seaweed species richness on a...

Data from: Sequencing improves our ability to study threatened migratory species: genetic population assignment in California's Central Valley Chinook salmon

Mariah H. Meek, Melinda R. Baerwald, Molly R. Stephens, Alisha Goodbla, Michael R. Miller, Katharine M. H. Tomalty & Bernie May
Effective conservation and management of migratory species requires accurate identification of unique populations, even as they mix along their migratory corridors. While telemetry has historically been used to study migratory animal movement and habitat use patterns, genomic tools are emerging as a superior alternative in many ways, allowing large-scale application at reduced costs. Here, we demonstrate the usefulness of genomic resources for identifying single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that allow fast and accurate identification of the imperiled...

Data from: Trophic sensitivity of invasive predator and native prey interactions: integrating environmental context and climate change

Brian S. Cheng, Lisa M. Komoroske & Edwin D. Grosholz
Climate change is predicted to intensify the impacts of invasive species by enhancing their performance relative to their native counterparts. However, few studies have compared the performance of invasive predators and native prey, despite the fact that non-native predators are well known to disrupt native communities. The ‘trophic sensitivity hypothesis’ suggests that predators are less tolerant of increasing environmental stress than their prey, whereas the ‘tolerant invaders hypothesis’ suggests that invaders are more tolerant than...

Data from: Retracted: Individual and group performance suffers from social niche disruption

Kate L. Laskowski, Pierre-Olivier Montiglio & Jonathan N. Pruitt
THE ASSOCIATED ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED. Further use of this data is not recommended. See https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/708066 The social niche specialization hypothesis predicts that animal personalities emerge as a result of individuals occupying different social niches within a group. Here we track individual personality and performance, and collective performance among groups of social spiders where we manipulated the familiarity of the group members. We show that individual personalities, as measured by consistent individual differences in boldness...

Data from: Microhabitat partitioning in seagrass mesograzers is driven by consistent species choices across multiple predator and competitor contexts

Moritz D. Lürig, Rebecca J. Best & John J. Stachowicz
Explanations for the coexistence of multiple species from the same functional group or taxonomic clade frequently include fine-scale resource partitioning. However, despite the hypothesized importance of niche partitioning, we know relatively little about the underlying mechanisms. For example, differences in resource use may be fixed consequences of organism traits, or they may be achieved via context-dependent behaviors. In this study we investigated mechanisms of microhabitat partitioning using eight species of marine mesograzers inhabiting seagrass and...

Data from: Discovery of metabolic biomarkers for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy within a natural history study

Simina M. Boca, Maki Nishida, Michael Harris, Shruti Rao, Amrita K. Cheema, Kirandeep Gill, Haeri Seol, Lauren P. Morgenroth, Erik Henricson, Craig McDonald, Jean K. Mah, Paula R. Clemens, Eric P. Hoffman, Yetrib Hathout & Subha Madhavan
Serum metabolite profiling in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) may enable discovery of valuable molecular markers for disease progression and treatment response. Serum samples from 51 DMD patients from a natural history study and 22 age-matched healthy volunteers were profiled using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for discovery of novel circulating serum metabolites associated with DMD. Fourteen metabolites were found significantly altered (1% false discovery rate) in their levels between DMD patients and healthy...

Data from: A Bayesian approach for detecting the impact of mass-extinction events on molecular phylogenies when rates of lineage diversification may vary

Michael R. May, Sebastian Hoehna & Brian R. Moore
The paleontological record chronicles numerous episodes of mass extinction that severely culled the Tree of Life. Biologists have long sought to assess the extent to which these events may have impacted particular groups. We present a novel method for detecting the impact of mass-extinction events on molecular phylogenies, even in the presence of tree-wide diversification-rate variation and in the absence of additional information from the fossil record. Our approach is based on an episodic stochastic-branching...

Data from: Calling in sick: impacts of fever on intra-urban human mobility

T. Alex Perkins, Valerie A. Paz-Soldan, Steven T. Stoddard, Amy C. Morrison, Brett M. Forshey, Kanya C. Long, Eric S. Halsey, Tadeusz J. Kochel, John P. Elder, Uriel Kitron, Thomas W. Scott & Gonzalo M. Vazquez-Prokopec
Pathogens inflict a wide variety of disease manifestations on their hosts, yet the impacts of disease on the behaviour of infected hosts are rarely studied empirically and are seldom accounted for in mathematical models of transmission dynamics. We explored the potential impacts of one of the most common disease manifestations, fever, on a key determinant of pathogen transmission, host mobility, in residents of the Amazonian city of Iquitos, Peru. We did so by comparing two...

Data from: Meniscus ascent by thrips (Thysanoptera)

Víctor Manuel Ortega-Jiménez, Sarahi Arriaga-Ramirez & Robert Dudley
Meniscus climbing using a fixed body posture has been well documented for various aquatic and neustonic insects, but is not known from small flying insects that inadvertently become trapped on water surfaces. Here, we show that thrips (order Thysanoptera) can ascend a meniscus by arching their non-wetting bodies to translate head-first and upward along a water surface; if initially oriented backwards, they can turn by 180° to ascend head-first, and climb upward on a surrounding...

Data from: A large and phylogenetically diverse class of type 1 opsins lacking a canonical retinal binding site

Erin A. Becker, Andrew I. Yao, Phillip M. Seitzer, Tobias Kind, Ting Wang, Rich Eigenheer, Katie S. Y. Shao, Vladimir Yarov-Yarovoy & Marc T. Facciotti
Opsins are photosensitive proteins catalyzing light-dependent processes across the tree of life. For both microbial (type 1) and metazoan (type 2) opsins, photosensing depends upon covalent interaction between a retinal chromophore and a conserved lysine residue. Despite recent discoveries of potential opsin homologs lacking this residue, phylogenetic dispersal and functional significance of these abnormal sequences have not yet been investigated. We report discovery of a large group of putatively non-retinal binding opsins, present in a...

Data from: Community traits affect plant–plant interactions across climatic gradients

Stella M. Copeland & Susan P. Harrison
Plant abundances and demography often vary along gradients of environmental stress, and neighboring plants can amplify or diminish such variation. We asked to what degree the effects of neighboring plants on a focal species can be explained by the traits and abundances of species in the surrounding community. We studied a common understory herb, Trientalis latifolia, across climatic gradients created by topography in the Siskiyou Mountains, southwestern Oregon. We compared Trientalis fitness along these gradients...

PLoS One Dodder Data January 2013

Shahla Farzan
An increasing body of evidence now indicates that parasitic species can have ecosystem-level impacts on species diversity patterns, trophic energy flow, and food web stability. Plant parasitic dodders (Cuscuta spp.) are globally distributed holoparasites that form a direct physical connection to host vascular tissue. As a hypergeneralist plant parasite, field dodder (Cuscuta campestris) can connect the phloem and xylem of widely divergent species simultaneously. Using C. campestris as a live bridge between plants, this study...

Data from: Critically evaluating the theory and performance of Bayesian analyis of macroevolutionary mixtures

Brian R. Moore, Sebastian Hoehna, Michael R. May, Bruce Rannala & John P. Huelsenbeck
Bayesian analysis of macroevolutionary mixtures (BAMM) has recently taken the study of lineage diversification by storm. BAMM estimates the diversification-rate parameters (speciation and extinction) for every branch of a study phylogeny and infers the number and location of diversification-rate shifts across branches of a tree. Our evaluation of BAMM reveals two major theoretical errors: (i) the likelihood function (which estimates the model parameters from the data) is incorrect, and (ii) the compound Poisson process prior...

Data from: Probabilistic divergence time estimation without branch lengths: dating the origins of dinosaurs, avian flight and crown birds

Graeme T. Lloyd, David W. Bapst, Matt Friedman & Katie E. Davis
Branch lengths—measured in character changes—are an essential requirement of clock-based divergence estimation, regardless of whether the fossil calibrations used represent nodes or tips. However, a separate set of divergence time approaches are typically used to date palaeontological trees, which may lack such branch lengths. Among these methods, sophisticated probabilistic approaches have recently emerged, in contrast with simpler algorithms relying on minimum node ages. Here, using a novel phylogenetic hypothesis for Mesozoic dinosaurs, we apply two...

Data from: Macroevolution of perfume signalling in orchid bees

Marjorie G. Weber, Lukasz Mitko, Thomas Eltz & Santiago R. Ramírez
Theory predicts that both stabilising selection and diversifying selection jointly contribute to the evolution of sexual signalling traits by (1) maintaining the integrity of communication signals within species and (2) promoting the diversification of traits among lineages. However, for many important signalling traits, little is known about whether these dynamics translate into predictable macroevolutionary signatures. Here, we test for macroevolutionary patterns consistent with sexual signalling theory in the perfume signals of neotropical orchid bees, a...

Data from: Spatiotemporal patterns of duck nest density and predation risk: a multi-scale analysis of 18 years and more than 10 000 nests

Kevin Ringelman, John M. Eadie, Joshua T. Ackerman, Andy Sih, Daniel L. Loughman, Gregory S. Yarris, Shaun L. Oldenburger, M. Robert McLandress, Kevin M. Ringelman & Andrew Sih
Many avian species are behaviorally-plastic in selecting nest sites, and may shift to new locations or habitats following an unsuccessful breeding attempt. If there is predictable spatial variation in predation risk, the process of many individuals using prior experience to adaptively change nest sites may scale up to create shifting patterns of nest density at a population level. We used 18 years of waterfowl nesting data to assess whether there were areas of consistently high...

Data from: Landscape genetics of the nonnative red fox of California

Benjamin N. Sacks, Jennifer L. Brazeal, Jefferey C. Lewis & Jeffrey C. Lewis
Invasive mammalian carnivores contribute disproportionately to declines in global biodiversity. In California, nonnative red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) have significantly impacted endangered ground-nesting birds and native canids. These foxes derive primarily from captive-reared animals associated with the fur-farming industry. Over the past five decades, the cumulative area occupied by nonnative red fox increased to cover much of central and southern California. We used a landscape-genetic approach involving mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences and 13 microsatellites of 402...

Data from: Tradeoffs, spatial heterogeneity, and the maintenance of microbial diversity

Stephanie S. Porter & Kevin J. Rice
Specialization and concomitant tradeoffs are assumed to underlie the non-neutral coexistence of lineages. Tradeoffs across heterogeneous environments can promote diversity by preventing competitive exclusion. However, the importance of tradeoffs in maintaining diversity in natural microbial assemblages is unclear, as tradeoffs are frequently not detected in artificial evolution experiments. Stressful conditions associated with patches of heavy-metal enriched serpentine soils provide excellent opportunities for examining how heterogeneity may foster genetic diversity. Using a spatially-replicated design, we demonstrate...

Data from: Replicated divergence in cichlid radiations mirrors a major vertebrate innovation

Matthew D. McGee, Brant C. Faircloth, Samuel R. Borstein, Jimmy Zheng, Christopher Darrin Hulsey, Peter C. Wainwright & Michael E. Alfaro
Decoupling of the upper jaw bones—jaw kinesis—is a distinctive feature of the ray-finned fishes, but it is not clear how the innovation is related to the extraordinary diversity of feeding behaviours and feeding ecology in this group. We address this issue in a lineage of ray-finned fishes that is well known for its ecological and functional diversity—African rift lake cichlids. We sequenced ultraconserved elements to generate a phylogenomic tree of the Lake Tanganyika and Lake...

Data from: The genomic landscape of rapid repeated evolutionary adaptation to toxic pollution in wild fish

Noah M. Reid, Dina A. Proestou, Bryan W. Clark, Wesley C. Warren, John K. Colbourne, Joseph R. Shaw, Sibel I. Karchner, Mark E. Hahn, Diane Nacci, Marjorie F. Oleksiak, Douglas L. Crawford & Andrew Whitehead
Atlantic killifish populations have rapidly adapted to normally lethal levels of pollution in four urban estuaries. Through analysis of 384 whole killifish genome sequences and comparative transcriptomics in four pairs of sensitive and tolerant populations, we identify the aryl hydrocarbon receptor–based signaling pathway as a shared target of selection. This suggests evolutionary constraint on adaptive solutions to complex toxicant mixtures at each site. However, distinct molecular variants apparently contribute to adaptive pathway modification among tolerant...

Data from: Pollinator-mediated assemblage processes in California wildflowers

Ryan Briscoe Runquist, Dena Grossenbacher, Stephanie Porter, Kathleen Kay & Joel Smith
Community assembly is the result of multiple ecological and evolutionary forces that influence species coexistence. For flowering plants, pollinators are often essential for plant reproduction and establishment, and pollinator-mediated interactions may influence plant community composition. Here, we use null models and community phylogenetic analyses of co-occurrence patterns to determine the role of pollinator-mediated processes in structuring plant communities dominated by congeners. We surveyed three species-rich genera (Limnanthes, Mimulus, and Clarkia) with centers of diversity in...

Data from: Long-term, high frequency in situ measurements of intertidal mussel bed temperatures using biomimetic sensors

Brian Helmuth, Francis Choi, Allison Matzelle, Jessica L. Torossian, Scott L. Morella, K. A. S. Mislan, Lauren Yamane, Denise Strickland, P. Lauren Szathmary, Sarah Gilman, Alyson Tockstein, Thomas J. Hilbish, Michael T. Burrows, Anne Marie Power, Elizabeth Gosling, Nova Mieszkowska, Christopher D. G. Harley, Michael Nishizaki, Emily Carrington, Bruce Menge, Laura Petes, Melissa M. Foley, Angela Johnson, Megan Poole, Mae M. Noble … & Gerardo Zardi
At a proximal level, the physiological impacts of global climate change on ectothermic organisms are manifest as changes in body temperatures. Especially for plants and animals exposed to direct solar radiation, body temperatures can be substantially different from air temperatures. We deployed biomimetic sensors that approximate the thermal characteristics of intertidal mussels at 71 sites worldwide, from 1998-present. Loggers recorded temperatures at 10–30 min intervals nearly continuously at multiple intertidal elevations. Comparisons against direct measurements...

Data from: Community trees: identifying codiversification in the páramo dipteran community

Bryan Charles Carstens, Michael Gruenstaeudl & Noah M. Reid
Groups of codistributed species that responded in a concerted manner to environmental events are expected to share patterns of evolutionary diversification. However, the identification of such groups has largely been based on qualitative, post hoc analyses. We develop here two methods (PPS, K-F ANOVA) for the analysis of codistributed species that, given a group of species with a shared pattern of diversification, allow empiricists to identify those taxa that do not codiversify (i.e., "outlier" species)....

Data from: Climate structures genetic variation across a species' elevation range: a test of range limits hypotheses

Jason P. Sexton, Matthew B. Hufford, Ashley Bateman, David B. Lowry, Harald Meimberg, Sharon Y. Strauss, Kevin J. Rice & Ashley C.Bateman
Gene flow may influence the formation of species range limits, yet little is known about the patterns of gene flow with respect to environmental gradients or proximity to range limits. With rapid environmental change it is especially important to understand patterns of gene flow to inform conservation efforts. Here we investigate the species range of the selfing, annual plant, Mimulus laciniatus, in the California Sierra Nevada. We assessed genetic variation, gene flow, and population abundance...

Data from: Spider phylogenomics: untangling the spider tree of life

Jason Bond, Nicole L. Garrison, Juanita Rodriguez, Ingi Agnarsson, Jonathan A. Coddington, Charles E. Griswold, Christopher A. Hamilton, Marshal Hedin, Kevin Kocot, Joel M. Ledford & Jason E. Bond
Spiders (Order Araneae) are massively abundant generalist arthropod predators that are found in nearly every ecosystem on the planet and have persisted for over 380 million years. Spiders have long served as evolutionary models for studying complex mating and web spinning behaviors, key innovation and adaptive radiation hypotheses, and have been inspiration for important theories like sexual selection by female choice. Unfortunately, past major attempts to reconstruct spider phylogeny typically employing the “usual suspect” genes...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    51

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    51

Affiliations

  • University of California, Davis
    51
  • University of California System
    6
  • University of California, Berkeley
    5
  • McGill University
    3
  • San Diego State University
    3
  • University of Washington
    2
  • University of Pittsburgh
    2
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    2
  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    2
  • California Polytechnic State University
    1