51 Works

Data from: Community trees: identifying codiversification in the páramo dipteran community

Bryan Charles Carstens, Michael Gruenstaeudl & Noah M. Reid
Groups of codistributed species that responded in a concerted manner to environmental events are expected to share patterns of evolutionary diversification. However, the identification of such groups has largely been based on qualitative, post hoc analyses. We develop here two methods (PPS, K-F ANOVA) for the analysis of codistributed species that, given a group of species with a shared pattern of diversification, allow empiricists to identify those taxa that do not codiversify (i.e., "outlier" species)....

Data from: Impacts of worker density in colony-level aggression, expansion, and survival of the acacia-ant Crematogaster mimosae

Juan Carlos Ruiz Guajardo, Dena L. Grossenbacher, Richard K. Grosberg, Todd M. Palmer, Maureen L. Stanton & Juan Carlos Ruiz-Guajardo
Experimental studies assessing the impact of demographic changes on aggression and inter-group competitive outcomes in communities of social species are rare. This gap in our knowledge is important, not only because social species are foundational elements of many terrestrial ecosystems, but because interference competition among social groups often involves decision-like processes influenced by demographic and environmental contexts. In East Africa, the symbiotic ant Crematogaster mimosae is a co-dominant competitor that engages in high-mortality, intra- and...

Data from: Experimental tests of the function and flexibility of song consistency in a wild bird

Conor C. Taff & Corey R. Freeman-Gallant
Measures of bird song that capture aspects of motor performance, such as consistency, have become a major focus in understanding sexual selection on song. Despite accumulating evidence that consistency is related to reproductive success in many species, the relative importance of male–male interactions and female–male interactions is still unclear. We studied the function and flexibility of song consistency and song rate in common yellowthroat warblers (Geothlypis trichas). A previous study of this population found that...

Data from: Behavioural hypervolumes of spider communities predict community performance and disbandment

Jonathan N. Pruitt, Daniel I. Bolnick, Andrew Sih, Nicholas DiRienzo & Noa Pinter-Wollman
Trait-based ecology argues that an understanding of the traits of interactors can enhance the predictability of ecological outcomes. We examine here whether the multidimensional behavioural-trait diversity of communities influences community performance and stability in situ. We created experimental communities of web-building spiders, each with an identical species composition. Communities contained one individual of each of five different species. Prior to establishing these communities in the field, we examined three behavioural traits for each individual spider....

Data from: Historical baselines and the future of shell calcification for a foundation species in a changing ocean

Catherine A. Pfister, Kaustuv Roy, J. Timothy Wootton, Sophie J. McCoy, Robert T. Paine, Thomas H. Suchanek & Eric Sanford
Seawater pH and the availability of carbonate ions is decreasing due to anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, posing challenges for calcifying marine species. Marine mussels are of particular concern given their role as foundation species worldwide. Here, we document shell growth and calcification patterns in Mytilus californianus, the California mussel, over millennial and decadal scales. By comparing shell thickness across the largest modern shells, the largest mussels collected in the 1960s-1970s and shells from two Native...

Data from: Ecomorphological convergence in planktivorous surgeonfishes

Sarah T. Friedman, Samantha A. Price, Andrew S. Hoey & Peter C. Wainwright
Morphological convergence plays a central role in the study of evolution. Often induced by shared ecological specialization, homoplasy hints at underlying selective pressures and adaptive constraints that deterministically shape the diversification of life. Though midwater zooplanktivory has arisen in adult surgeonfishes (family Acanthuridae) at least four independent times, it represents a clearly specialized state, requiring the capacity to swiftly swim in midwater locating and sucking small prey items. While this diet has commonly been associated...

Data from: Adaptation to an invasive host is driving the loss of a native ecotype

Meredith L. Cenzer
Locally adapted populations are often used as model systems for the early stages of ecological speciation, but most of these young divergent populations will never become complete species. The maintenance of local adaptation relies on the strength of natural selection overwhelming the homogenizing effects of gene flow; however, this balance may be readily upset in changing environments. Here I show that soapberry bugs (Jadera haematoloma) have lost adaptations to their native host plant (Cardiospermum corindum)...

Data from: Habitat and social factors shape individual decisions and emergent group structure during baboon collective movement

Ariana Strandburg-Peshkin, Damien R. Farine, Margaret C. Crofoot & Iain D. Couzin
For group-living animals traveling through heterogeneous landscapes, collective movement can be influenced by both habitat structure and social interactions. Yet research in collective behavior has largely neglected habitat influences on movement. Here we integrate simultaneous, high-resolution, tracking of wild baboons within a troop with a 3-dimensional reconstruction of their habitat to identify key drivers of baboon movement. A previously unexplored social influence – baboons’ preference for locations that other troop members have recently traversed –...

Data from: Post-fire recovery in coastal sage scrub: seed rain and community trajectory

Erin Conlisk, Rebecca Swab, Alejandra Martínez-Berdeja & Matthew P. Daugherty
Disturbance is a primary mechanism structuring ecological communities. However, human activity has the potential to alter the frequency and intensity of natural disturbance regimes, with subsequent effects on ecosystem processes. In Southern California, human development has led to increased fire frequency close to urban areas that can form a positive feedback with invasive plant spread. Understanding how abiotic and biotic factors structure post-fire plant communities is a critical component of post-fire management and restoration. In...

Data from: Spider phylogenomics: untangling the spider tree of life

Jason Bond, Nicole L. Garrison, Juanita Rodriguez, Ingi Agnarsson, Jonathan A. Coddington, Charles E. Griswold, Christopher A. Hamilton, Marshal Hedin, Kevin Kocot, Joel M. Ledford & Jason E. Bond
Spiders (Order Araneae) are massively abundant generalist arthropod predators that are found in nearly every ecosystem on the planet and have persisted for over 380 million years. Spiders have long served as evolutionary models for studying complex mating and web spinning behaviors, key innovation and adaptive radiation hypotheses, and have been inspiration for important theories like sexual selection by female choice. Unfortunately, past major attempts to reconstruct spider phylogeny typically employing the “usual suspect” genes...

Data from: Climate structures genetic variation across a species' elevation range: a test of range limits hypotheses

Jason P. Sexton, Matthew B. Hufford, Ashley Bateman, David B. Lowry, Harald Meimberg, Sharon Y. Strauss, Kevin J. Rice & Ashley C.Bateman
Gene flow may influence the formation of species range limits, yet little is known about the patterns of gene flow with respect to environmental gradients or proximity to range limits. With rapid environmental change it is especially important to understand patterns of gene flow to inform conservation efforts. Here we investigate the species range of the selfing, annual plant, Mimulus laciniatus, in the California Sierra Nevada. We assessed genetic variation, gene flow, and population abundance...

Data from: Long-term, high frequency in situ measurements of intertidal mussel bed temperatures using biomimetic sensors

Brian Helmuth, Francis Choi, Allison Matzelle, Jessica L. Torossian, Scott L. Morella, K. A. S. Mislan, Lauren Yamane, Denise Strickland, P. Lauren Szathmary, Sarah Gilman, Alyson Tockstein, Thomas J. Hilbish, Michael T. Burrows, Anne Marie Power, Elizabeth Gosling, Nova Mieszkowska, Christopher D. G. Harley, Michael Nishizaki, Emily Carrington, Bruce Menge, Laura Petes, Melissa M. Foley, Angela Johnson, Megan Poole, Mae M. Noble … & Gerardo Zardi
At a proximal level, the physiological impacts of global climate change on ectothermic organisms are manifest as changes in body temperatures. Especially for plants and animals exposed to direct solar radiation, body temperatures can be substantially different from air temperatures. We deployed biomimetic sensors that approximate the thermal characteristics of intertidal mussels at 71 sites worldwide, from 1998-present. Loggers recorded temperatures at 10–30 min intervals nearly continuously at multiple intertidal elevations. Comparisons against direct measurements...

Data from: Pollinator-mediated assemblage processes in California wildflowers

Ryan Briscoe Runquist, Dena Grossenbacher, Stephanie Porter, Kathleen Kay & Joel Smith
Community assembly is the result of multiple ecological and evolutionary forces that influence species coexistence. For flowering plants, pollinators are often essential for plant reproduction and establishment, and pollinator-mediated interactions may influence plant community composition. Here, we use null models and community phylogenetic analyses of co-occurrence patterns to determine the role of pollinator-mediated processes in structuring plant communities dominated by congeners. We surveyed three species-rich genera (Limnanthes, Mimulus, and Clarkia) with centers of diversity in...

Data from: Wolbachia in the Drosophila yakuba complex: pervasive frequency variation and weak cytoplasmic incompatibility, but no apparent effect on reproductive isolation

Brandon S. Cooper, Paul S. Ginsberg, Michael Turelli & Daniel R. Matute
Three hybridizing species-the clade ((Drosophila yakuba, D. santomea), D. teissieri) -comprise the yakuba complex in the D. melanogaster subgroup. Their ranges overlap on Bioko and São Tomé, islands off west Africa. All three species are infected with Wolbachia, maternally inherited, endosymbiotic bacteria, best known for manipulating host reproduction to favor infected females. Previous analyses reported no cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) in these species. However, we discovered that Wolbachia from each species cause intra- and interspecific CI....

Data from: Survival by genotype: patterns at Mc1r are not black and white at the White Sands ecotone

Simone Des Roches, Rahel Sollmann, Kendall Calhoun, A. P. Rothstein & Erica B. Rosenblum
Measuring links among genotype, phenotype and survival in the wild has long been a focus of studies of adaptation. We conducted a 4-year capture–recapture study to measure survival by genotype and phenotype in the Southwestern Fence Lizard (Sceloporus cowlesi) at the White Sands ecotone (transition area between white sands and dark soil habitats). We report several unanticipated findings. First, in contrast with previous work showing that cryptic blanched coloration in S. cowlesi from the heart...

Data from: Development and characterization of 15 polymorphic di-nucleotide microsatellite markers for tule elk using HiSeq3000

Benjamin N. Sacks, Zachary T. Lounsberry, Tatyana Kalani, Erin P. Meredith & Cristen Langner
The tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) experienced a severe bottleneck in the 1800s, resulting in low genetic diversity. There is a need for high-resolution genetic assays that can be used to differentiate individual elk, including close relatives, with high confidence. An efficient assay requires multiple markers both polymorphic and that can be amplified in concert with other markers in multiplex reactions. To develop such markers, we employed 150-bp paired-end whole genome shotgun sequencing on an...

Data from: A test of the invasive pathogen hypothesis of bumble bee decline in North America

Sydney A. Cameron, Haw C. Lim, Jeffrey D. Lozier, Michelle Audrey Duennes & Robbin Thorp
Emergent fungal diseases are critical factors in global biodiversity declines. The fungal pathogen Nosema bombi was recently found to be widespread in declining species of North American bumble bees (Bombus), with circumstantial evidence suggesting an exotic introduction from Europe. This interpretation has been hampered by a lack of knowledge of global genetic variation, geographic origin, and changing prevalence patterns of N. bombi in declining North American populations. Thus, the temporal and spatial emergence of N....

Data from: Geosmithia associated with bark beetles and woodborers in the western USA: taxonomic diversity and vector specificity

Miroslav Kolařík, Steven J. Seybold, Ned Tisserat, Wilhelm De Beer, David M. Rizzo, Jiri Hulcr & Martin Kostovčík
Fungi in the genus Geosmithia (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) are frequent associates of bark beetles and woodborers that colonize hardwood and coniferous trees. One species, Geosmithia morbida, is an economically damaging invasive species. The authors surveyed the Geosmithia species of California and Colorado, USA, to (i) provide baseline data on taxonomy of Geosmithia and beetle vector specificity across the western USA; (ii) investigate the subcortical beetle fauna for alternative vectors of the invasive G. morbida; and (iii)...

Data from: Chaotic genetic patchiness without sweepstakes reproduction in the shore crab Hemigrapsus oregonensis

Brendan H. Cornwell, Jennifer L. Fisher, Steven G. Morgan, Joseph E. Neigel, BH Cornwell, JE Neigel, JL Fisher & SG Morgan
Fine-scale spatial and temporal variation in the genetic composition of benthic recruits, known as chaotic genetic patchiness, is often observed in marine and estuarine species with planktonic larvae. Several explanations have been proposed for chaotic genetic patchiness, including sweepstakes reproductive success, variability in larval source and natural selection. In a survey of the green shore crab Hemigrapsus oregonensis in Bodega Bay, California, allele frequencies at a mitochondrial single nucleotide polymorphism were found to differ significantly...

Data from: Altered expression of pectoral myosin heavy chain isoforms corresponds to migration status in the white-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii)

Brandy P. Velten, Kenneth C. Welch & Marilyn Ramenofsky
Birds undergo numerous changes as they progress through life-history stages, yet relatively few studies have examined how birds adapt to both the dynamic energetic and mechanical demands associated with such transitions. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression, often linked with muscle fibre type, is strongly correlated with a muscle's mechanical power-generating capability, thus we examined several morphological properties, including MyHC expression of the pectoralis, in a long-distance migrant, the white-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii) throughout the...

Data from: Anopheles gambiae: metabolomic profiles in sugar-fed, blood-fed and Plasmodium falciparum-infected midgut

Cody Champion, Phanidhar Kukutla, Elizabeth K. K. Glennon, Bo Wang, Shirley Luckhart, Jiannong Xu & Cody J. Champion
The mosquito midgut is a physiological organ essential for the nutrient acquisition as well as an interface that encounters various mosquito borne pathogens. Metabolomic characterization would reveal biochemical fingerprints that are generated by various cellular processes. The metabolite profiles of the mosquito midgut will provide an overview of the biochemical events in both physiological states and the dynamic responses to pathogen infections. In this study, the midgut metabolic profiles of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes following feeding...

Data from: Correlational selection on personality and social plasticity: morphology and social context determine behavioural effects on mating success

Pierre-Olivier Montiglio, Tina W. Wey, Ann T. Chang, Sean Fogarty & Andrew Sih
Despite a central line of research aimed at quantifying relationships between mating success and sexually dimorphic traits (e.g., ornaments), individual variation in sexually selected traits often explains only a modest portion of the variation in mating success. Another line of research suggests that a significant portion of the variation in mating success observed in animal populations could be explained by correlational selection, where the fitness advantage of a given trait depends on other components of...

Data from: The contribution of developmental experience vs. condition to life history, trait variation, and individual differences

Nicholas DiRienzo & Pierre-Olivier Montiglio
Developmental experience, for example food abundance during juvenile stages, is known to affect life history and behaviour. However, the life history and behavioural consequences of developmental experience have rarely been studied in concert. As a result it is still unclear whether developmental experience affects behaviour through changes in life history, or independently of it. The effect of developmental experience on life history and behaviour may also be masked or affected by individual condition during adulthood....

Data from: Phylogenetics support an ancient common origin of two scientific icons: Devils Hole and Devils Hole pupfish

İsmail K. Sağlam, Jason Baumsteiger, Matt J. Smith, Javier Linares-Casenave, Andrew L. Nichols, Sean M. O'Rourke & Michael R. Miller
The Devils Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis; DHP) is an icon of conservation biology. Isolated in a 50 m2 pool (Devils Hole), DHP is one of the rarest vertebrate species known and an evolutionary anomaly, having survived in complete isolation for thousands of years. However, recent findings suggest DHP might be younger than commonly thought, potentially introduced to Devils Hole by humans in the past thousand years. As a result, the significance of DHP from an...

Data from: Genetic heterogeneity underlying variation in a locally adaptive clinal trait in Pinus sylvestris revealed by a Bayesian multipopulation analysis

Sonja T. Kujala, Timo Knürr, Katri Kärkkäinen, David B. Neale, Mikko J. Sillanpää & Outi Savolainen
Local adaptation is a common feature of plant and animal populations. Adaptive phenotypic traits are genetically differentiated along environmental gradients, but the genetic basis of such adaptation is still poorly known. Genetic association studies of local adaptation combine data over populations. Correcting for population structure in these studies can be problematic since both selection and neutral demographic events can create similar allele frequency differences between populations. Correcting for demography with traditional methods may lead to...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    51

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    51

Affiliations

  • University of California, Davis
    51
  • University of California System
    6
  • University of California, Berkeley
    5
  • McGill University
    3
  • San Diego State University
    3
  • University of Washington
    2
  • University of Pittsburgh
    2
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    2
  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    2
  • California Polytechnic State University
    1