62 Works

Data from: Sympatric, temporally isolated populations of the pine white butterfly Neophasia menapia, are morphologically and genetically differentiated

Katherine L. Bell, Christopher A. Hamm, Arthur M. Shapiro & Chris C. Nice
Temporal isolation remains an understudied, and potentially under-appreciated, mechanism of reproductive isolation. Phenological differences have been discovered in populations of the pine white butterfly (Neophasia menapia), a typically univoltine species found throughout western North America. At two locations in the Coast Range of California there are two periods of adult emergence per year, one in early summer (July) and one in late summer/autumn (September/October). Differences in flight time are accompanied by differences in wing shape...

Data from: Influence of damming on anuran species richness in riparian areas: a test of the serial discontinuity concept

Jacquelyn C. Guzy, Evan A. Eskew, Brian J. Halstead & Steven J. Price
1. Almost all large rivers worldwide are fragmented by dams, and their impacts have been modelled using the serial discontinuity concept (SDC), a series of predictions regarding responses of key biotic and abiotic variables. 2. We evaluated the effects of damming on anuran communities along a 245-km river corridor by conducting repeated, time-constrained anuran calling surveys at 42 locations along the Broad and Pacolet Rivers in South Carolina, USA. 3. Using a hierarchical Bayesian analysis,...

Data from: Latitudinal variation in plant chemical defences drives latitudinal patterns of leaf herbivory

Xoaquón Moreira, Bastien Castagneyrol, Luis Abdala-Roberts, Jorge C. Berny-Mier Y Terán, Bart G. H. Timmermans, Hans Henrik Kehlet Bruun, Felisa Covelo, Gaétan Glauser, Sergio Rasmann, Ayco J. M. Tack & Hans Henrik Bruun
A long-standing paradigm in ecology holds that herbivore pressure and thus plant defences increase towards lower latitudes. However, recent work has challenged this prediction where studies have found no relationship or opposite trends where herbivory or plant defences increase at higher latitudes. Here we tested for latitudinal variation in herbivory, chemical defences (phenolic compounds), and nutritional traits (phosphorus and nitrogen) in leaves of a long-lived tree species, the English oak Quercus robur. We further investigated...

Data from: Founder events, isolation, and inbreeding: Intercontinental genetic structure of the domestic ferret

Kyle D. Gustafson, Michelle G. Hawkins, Tracy L. Drazenovich, Robert Church, Susan A. Brown & Holly B. Ernest
Domestication and breeding for human-desired morphological traits can reduce population genetic diversity via founder events and artificial selection, resulting in inbreeding depression and genetic disorders. The ferret (Mustela putorius furo) was domesticated from European polecats (M. putorius), transported to multiple continents, and has been artificially selected for several traits. The ferret is now a common pet, a laboratory model organism, and feral ferrets can impact native biodiversity. We hypothesized global ferret trade resulted in distinct...

Data from: Different clades and traits yield similar grassland functional responses

Elisabeth J. Forrestel, Michael J. Donoghue, Erika J. Edwards, Walter Jetz, Justin C. O. Du Toit & Melinda D. Smith
Plant functional traits are viewed as key to predicting important ecosystem and community properties across resource gradients within and among biogeographic regions. Vegetation dynamics and ecosystem processes, such as aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP), are increasingly being modeled as a function of the quantitative traits of species, which are used as proxies for photosynthetic rates, and nutrient and water-use efficiency. These approaches rely on an assumption that a certain trait value consistently confers a specific...

Data from: Usage of unscheduled hospital care by homeless individuals in Dublin, Ireland: a cross-sectional study

Clíona Ní Cheallaigh, Sarah Cullivan, Jess Sears, Ann Marie Lawlee, Joseph Browne, Jennifer Kieran, Ricardo Segurado, Austin O'Carroll, Fiona O'Reilly, Donnacha Creagh, Colm Bergin, Rose Anne Kenny & Declan Byrne
Objectives: Homeless people lack a secure, stable place to live, and experience higher rates of serious illness than the housed population. Studies, mainly from the US, have reported increased use of unscheduled health care by homeless individuals. We compared the use of unscheduled ED and inpatient care between housed and homeless hospital patients in a high-income European setting. Setting: A large university teaching hospital serving the south inner city in Dublin, Ireland. Patient data is...

Data from: Circadian rhythms vary over the growing season and correlate with fitness components

Matthew J. Rubin, Marcus T. Brock, Amanda M. Davis, Zachary M. German, Mary Knapp, Stephen M. Welch, Stacey L. Harmer, Julin N. Maloof, Seth J. Davis & Cynthia Weinig
Circadian clocks have evolved independently in all three domains of life, suggesting that internal mechanisms of time-keeping are adaptive in contemporary populations. However, the performance consequences of either discrete or quantitative clock variation have rarely been tested in field settings. Clock sensitivity of diverse segregating lines to the environment remains uncharacterized as do the statistical genetic parameters that determine evolutionary potential. In field studies with Arabidopsis thaliana, we found that major perturbations to circadian cycle...

Data from: Macroecological patterns of sexual size dimorphism in turtles of the world

Mickey Agha, Joshua R. Ennen, A. Justin Nowakowski, Jeffrey E. Lovich, Sarah C. Sweat & Brian D. Todd
Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) is a well-documented phenomenon in both plants and animals; however, the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that drive and maintain SSD patterns across geographic space at regional and global scales are understudied, especially for reptiles. Our goal was to examine geographic variation of turtle SSD and to explore ecological and environmental correlates using phylogenetic comparative methods. We use published body size data on 135 species from nine turtle families to examine how...

Data from: Why does the rate of signal production in ectotherms vary with temperature?

Terry J. Ord & Judy A. Stamps
The rate of signal production by social ectotherms is often temperature dependent. This has been typically attributed to an underlying thermal constraint on physiology, but there are other reasons why signal rates might be correlated to temperature. We tested 3 hypotheses. The maximal performance hypothesis: temperature limits motor activity at cold and hot temperatures, which predicts a hump-shape function between signal rate and temperature. The metabolic rate hypothesis: the available energy released by metabolism increases...

Data for analysis of snowmelt timing as a determinant of inflow mixing in Lake Tahoe

Derek Roberts, Shohei Watanabe & S. Geoffrey Schladow
This dataset includes data files pertinent to the manuscript, "Snowmelting timing as a determinant of inflow mixing," accepted for publication in Water Resources Research in January 2018. Included data were used for an analysis of relative stream-lake conditions as they pertain to winter climate conditions and the subsequent mixing of snowmelt inflows into the lake. Included with each of the six files listed below is a [FILENAME]_Reference.txt file with details on data collection, curation, and...

A microbial survey of the International Space Station (ISS)

Jonathan Eisen, David Coil & Jenna Lang
Background Modern advances in sequencing technology have enabled the census of microbial members of many natural ecosystems. Recently, attention is increasingly being paid to the microbial residents of human-made, built ecosystems, both private (homes) and public (subways, office buildings, and hospitals). Here, we report results of the characterization of the microbial ecology of a singular built environment, the International Space Station (ISS). This ISS sampling involved the collection and microbial analysis (via 16S rDNA PCR)...

Soil Water Content at MMWD

Peter Hartsough
These data were collected using Decagon (Meter) GS1 sensors at two different depths, 30cm and 60cm. Data were collected hourly and these are mean values at the three different sites.

Data from: Tracking restoration of population diversity via the portfolio effect

Lauren Yamane, Louis W. Botsford & David P. Kilduff
1. Declines in diversity among populations managed together have diminished aggregate stability through a decreased portfolio effect. Although the portfolio effect has been quantified in a variety of ways, management recommendations for the recovery of lost diversity rarely specify the stability benefits possible through such improvements. 2. We introduce a metric, the Diversity Deficit (DD), that relates past losses and potential gains in aggregate stability to the changes in population diversity (i.e., covariability among population...

Data from: When environmental factors become stressors: interactive effects of vermetid gastropods and sedimentation on corals

Julie Zill, Michael A. Gil, Craig W. Osenberg & Julie A. Zill
Environmental stressors often interact, but most studies of multiple stressors have focused on combinations of abiotic stressors. Here we examined the potential interaction between a biotic stressor, the vermetid snail Ceraesignum maximum, and an abiotic stressor, high sedimentation, on the growth of reef-building corals. In a field experiment, we subjected juvenile massive Porites corals to four treatments: (i) neither stressor, (ii) sedimentation, (iii) vermetids or (iv) both stressors. Unexpectedly, we found no effect of either...

Data from: Precipitation drives global variation in natural selection

Adam Siepielski, Michael B. Morrissey, Mathieu Buoro, Stephanie M. Carlson, Christina M. Caruso, Sonya M. Clegg, Tim Coulson, Joseph DiBattista, Kiyoko M. Gotanda, Clinton D. Francis, Joe Hereford, Joel G. Kingsolver, Kate E. Augustine, Loeske E. B. Kruuk, Ryan A. Martin, Ben C. Sheldon, Nina Sletvold, Erik I. Svensson, Michael J. Wade & Andrew D. C. MacColl
Climate change has the potential to affect the ecology and evolution of every species on Earth. Although the ecological consequences of climate change are increasingly well documented, the effects of climate on the key evolutionary process driving adaptation—natural selection—are largely unknown. We report that aspects of precipitation and potential evapotranspiration, along with the North Atlantic Oscillation, predicted variation in selection across plant and animal populations throughout many terrestrial biomes, whereas temperature explained little variation. By...

Data from: An experimental test of local adaptation among cytotypes within a polyploid complex

Patrick J. McIntyre & Sharon Strauss
The geographic distributions of polyploids suggest they can have distinct and sometimes broader niches compared to diploids. However, relatively few field experiments have investigated whether range differences are associated with local adaptation or reflect other processes, such as dispersal limitation. In three years of transplants across the elevational ranges of five cytotypes in the Claytonia perfoliata complex, we found evidence for local adaptation. In at least one study year germination was higher within the natural...

Data from: Facultative pupal mating in Heliconius erato: implications for mate choice, female preference, and speciation

Timothy J. Thurman, Emily Brodie, Elizabeth Evans & William Owen McMillan
Mating systems have broad impacts on how sexual selection and mate choice operate within a species, but studies of mating behavior in the laboratory may not reflect how these processes occur in the wild. Here, we examined the mating behavior of the neotropical butterfly Heliconius erato in the field by releasing larvae and virgin females and observing how they mated. H. erato is considered a pupal-mating species (i.e., males mate with females as they emerge...

Data from: Implications of fidelity and philopatry for the population structure of female black-tailed deer

Samhita Bose, Tavis D. Forrester, Jennifer L. Brazeal, Benjamin N. Sacks, David S. Casady & Heiko U. Wittmer
Site fidelity and philopatry are behavioral adaptations found in many species and their fitness benefits are well documented. The combined population level consequences of site fidelity and philopatry, however, have received little attention despite their importance for understanding spatial patterns in connectivity and population dynamics. We used an integrative approach to explore consequences of fidelity and philopatry on the fine-scale genetic structure of black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus). We assessed fidelity to seasonal home ranges...

Data from: Enriching the ant tree of life: enhanced UCE bait set for genome-scale phylogenetics of ants and other Hymenoptera

Michael G. Branstetter, John T. Longino, Philip S. Ward & Brant C. Faircloth
1. Targeted enrichment of conserved genomic regions (e.g., ultraconserved elements or UCEs) has emerged as a promising tool for inferring evolutionary history in many organismal groups. Because the UCE approach is still relatively new, much remains to be learned about how best to identify UCE loci and design baits to enrich them. 2. We test an updated UCE identification and bait design workflow for the insect order Hymenoptera, with a particular focus on ants. The...

Data from: Plastic transcriptomes stabilize immunity to pathogen diversity: the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid networks within the Arabidopsis/Botrytis pathosystem

Wei Zhang, Jason A. Corwin, Daniel Copeland, Julie Feusier, Robert Eshbaugh, Fang Chen, Susanna Atwell & Daniel J. Kliebenstein
To respond to pathogen attack, selection and associated evolution has led to the creation of plant immune system that are a highly effective and inducible defense system. Central to this system are the plant defense hormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) and crosstalk between the two, which may play an important role in defense responses to specific pathogens or even genotypes. Here, we used the Arabidopsis-B. cinerea pathosystem to test how the host's...

Data from: Altered physical and social conditions produce rapidly reversible mating systems in water striders

Andrew Sih, Pierre-Olivier Montiglio, Tina W. Wey & Sean Fogarty
Mating systems can vary within-species but the environmental drivers and behavioral mechanisms underlying this variation are seldom investigated experimentally. We experimentally assessed how individual behavioral plasticity in response to changes in pool and group size resulted in fundamental shifts in mating systems in water striders. We observed the same animals in larger and smaller pools, mimicking variation in pool size in natural streams, and observed a rapid, reversible change in the entire mating system. In...

Data from: Top predators determine how biodiversity is partitioned across time and space

Benjamin G. Van Allen, Nick L. Rasmussen, Christopher J. Dibble, Patrick A. Clay, Volker H.W. Rudolf & Volker H. W. Rudolf
Natural ecosystems are shaped along two fundamental axes, space and time, but how biodiversity is partitioned along both axes is not well understood. Here, we show that the relationship between temporal and spatial biodiversity patterns can vary predictably according to habitat characteristics. By quantifying seasonal and annual changes in larval dragonfly communities across a natural predation gradient we demonstrate that variation in the identity of top predator species is associated with systematic differences in spatio-temporal...

Data from: Decoupled diversification dynamics of feeding morphology following a major functional innovation in marine butterflyfishes

Nicolai Konow, Samantha Price, Rickard Abom, David Bellwood, Peter Wainwright & Richard Abom
The diversity of fishes on coral reefs is influenced by the evolution of feeding innovations. For instance, the evolution of an intramandibular jaw joint has aided shifts to corallivory in Chaetodon butterflyfishes following their Miocene colonization of coral reefs. Today, over half of all Chaetodon species consume coral, easily the largest concentration of corallivores in any reef fish family. In contrast with Chaetodon, other chaetodontids, including the long-jawed bannerfishes, remain less intimately associated with coral...

Data from: Alongshore variation in barnacle populations is determined by surfzone hydrodynamics

Alan L. Shanks, Steven G. Morgan, Jamie MacMahan, Ad J.H.M. Reniers & Ad J. H. M. Reniers
Larvae in the coastal ocean are transported toward shore by a variety of mechanisms. Crossing the surf zone is the last step in a shoreward migration and surf zones may act as semipermeable barriers altering delivery of larvae to the shore. We related variation in the structure of intertidal barnacle populations to surfzone width (surfzone hydrodynamics proxy), wave height, alongshore wind stress (upwelling proxy), solar radiation, and latitude at 40 rocky intertidal sites from San...

Data from: Commonness, rarity and oligarchies of woody plants in the tropical dry forests of Mexico

John N. Williams, Irma Trejo & Mark W. Schwartz
We assessed woody plant communities in two widely separated forests in the tropical dry forest (TDF) biome of Mexico for evidence of similar patterns of species commonness and rarity. We used belt transects laid out along contour lines (i.e., constant elevation) and stratified across elevation gradients at sites in Jalisco and Oaxaca to sample woody plant species diversity, abundance, relative frequency and basal area. We assembled a combined species list and compared species found in...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    62

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    62

Affiliations

  • University of California, Davis
    62
  • University of Wyoming
    5
  • United States Geological Survey
    4
  • Michigan State University
    4
  • University of Georgia
    3
  • University of California, Berkeley
    3
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    3
  • Colorado State University
    3
  • Victoria University of Wellington
    2
  • University of Montana
    2