6 Works

Data from: Species richness and phylogenetic diversity of seed plants across vegetation zones of Mount Kenya, East Africa

Yadong Zhou, Sichong Chen, Guangwan Hu, Geoffrey Mwachala, Xue Yan, Qing-Feng Wang & Qingfeng Wang
Mount Kenya is of ecological importance in tropical east Africa due to the dramatic gradient in vegetation types that can be observed from low to high elevation zones. However, species richness and phylogenetic diversity of this mountain have not been well studied. Here, we surveyed distribution patterns for a total of 1,335 seed plants of this mountain and calculated species richness and phylogenetic diversity across seven vegetation zones. We also measured phylogenetic structure using the...

Data from: Acoustic stability in hyrax snorts: vocal tightrope-walkers or wrathful verbal assailants?

Yishai A. Weissman, Vlad Demartsev, Amiyaal Ilany, Adi Barocas, Einat Bar-Ziv, Inbar Shnitser, Eli Geffen, Lee Koren & Inbar Shnitzer
The source-filter theory proposes that information on caller properties is communicated through acoustic qualities, as physical state and performance ability are reflected in the voice. Vocal stability, manifested through harshness is especially intriguing, and has rarely been explored although harsh sounds are prevalent in nature. Male rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis) produce loud complex calls that we term songs. Only the calls of older, socially dominant males, include a harsh sound termed snort. As snorts are...

Data from: Energy exchanges at contact events guide sensorimotor integration across intermodal delays

Ali Farshchian, Alessandra Sciutti, Assaf Pressman, Ilana Nisky & Ferdinando A Mussa-Ivaldi
The brain must consider the arm's inertia to predict the arm's movements elicited by commands impressed upon the muscles. Here, we present evidence suggesting that the integration of sensory information leading to the representation of the arm's inertia does not take place continuously in time but only at discrete transient events, in which kinetic energy is exchanged between the arm and the environment. We used a visuomotor delay to induce cross-modal variations in state feedback...

Data from: The role of climate, water and biotic interactions in shaping biodiversity patterns in arid environments across spatial scales

Orly Razgour, Mike Persey, Uzi Shamir & Carmi Korine
Aim: Desert ecosystems, with their harsh environmental conditions, hold the key to understanding the responses of biodiversity to climate change. As desert community structure is influenced by processes acting at different spatial scales, studies combining multiple scales are essential for understanding the conservation requirements of desert biota. We investigated the role of environmental variables and biotic interactions in shaping broad and fine-scale patterns of diversity and distribution of bats in arid environments to understand how...

Data from: Crop pests and predators exhibit inconsistent responses to surrounding landscape composition

Daniel S. Karp, Rebecca Chaplin-Kramer, Timothy D. Meehan, Emily A. Martin, Fabrice DeClerck, Heather Grab, Claudio Gratton, Lauren Hunt, Ashley E. Larsen, Alejandra Martínez-Salinas, Megan E. O’Rourke, Adrien Rusch, Katja Poveda, Mattias Jonsson, Jay A. Rosenheim, Nancy A. Schellhorn, Teja Tscharntke, Stephen D. Wratten, Wei Zhang, Aaron L. Iverson, Lynn S. Adler, Matthias Albrecht, Audrey Alignier, Gina M. Angelella, Muhammad Zubair Anjum … & Yi Zou
The idea that noncrop habitat enhances pest control and represents a win–win opportunity to conserve biodiversity and bolster yields has emerged as an agroecological paradigm. However, while noncrop habitat in landscapes surrounding farms sometimes benefits pest predators, natural enemy responses remain heterogeneous across studies and effects on pests are inconclusive. The observed heterogeneity in species responses to noncrop habitat may be biological in origin or could result from variation in how habitat and biocontrol are...

Data from: Female mosquitoes disperse further when they develop under predation risk

Yehonatan Alcalay, Ido Tsurim & Ofer Ovadia
Predation is one of the strongest selective forces in nature. Organisms characterized by a complex life cycle, undergoing an ontogenetic niche shift, can reduce predation risk on natal stages by metamorphosing earlier. Yet, this anti-predatory response may incur numerous life-history-related costs. Interestingly, the consequence of larval predation risk on adult dispersal, a key trait dictating the persistence of spatially-structured populations, is largely understudied. Here, we explored the effect of larval predation risk on the life-history...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
    6
  • Tel Aviv University
    2
  • Northwestern University
    1
  • University of Padua
    1
  • Universidade Federal de Goiás
    1
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    1
  • University of Buenos Aires
    1
  • University of Adelaide
    1
  • Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education
    1
  • Jiangxi Agricultural University
    1